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Old 22-01-2013, 20:34
IzzyS
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Scotland
Posts: 8,764
From what I understood, it was the writer who said Savile used a mask, not the "victim" and the whole ritual seemed to me more a staged act to scare her. A sadistic thing. Not that I believe in the story.

About "ritual abuse", I used to be of the same opinion of you. I'm not sure Wikipedia is the best source of info and so of the cases in the article remain "inconclusive". There seemed to be a "moral panic" about day care institutions in the 80's and early 90's that undermined the whole idea, especially in the US.

Then I watched this German documentary.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUzQ7aqFyiU

(It is in five parts. Terrible stuff)

And I'm not sure if I don't believe it anymore. The problem with "ritual abuse" is that the idea was hijacked by christians fundamentalists and conspiracy theorists, who thinks the world is controlled by Illuminati/Masons/Satan Worshippers/Jews colluded with the Catholic Church, etc. If there is "ritual abuse" these people are not helping.
Regarding Wikipedia, the way I look at it is its information is as good as the sources provided. Really Wikipedia is just a place (a massive notice board of sorts or obviously an electronic encyclopedia) for posting things - its up to the person who makes the entry to provide sources or a bibliography to back up whats written. I've heard people say not to take everything you read there as fact but that applies to any website - anyone could type anything really, the proof is in the legitimacy of such sources (or as its referred to on the site 'References').

I've heard one or two people hint that they think everything on Wikipedia is nonsense or overly exaggerated, which makes me wonder if they read inaccurate information on another website, would they be more likely to believe it but if they read truthful information via Wikipedia, they'd take it with a grain of salt? it seems a little daft.

I guess the question of which site (if any) is specifically the best source of information on a given subject is slightly different though but I just wanted to throw that out there (sorry for going perhaps a bit off topic there).

The black and green Kaftans was part of the textiles auction of his bits when he died.

Page 5 Black Kaftan Item 215 sold for 170

Page 6 Green Kaftan with accompanying photograph of JS on Top of the Pops item 261 sold for 120

You may have to C&P the link into your browser.

http://www.dnfa.com/search.asp?view=keyword&auction=13560&keyword=||&lotno=&noperpage=20&cat=&pg=80&orderby=&noofresults=171&catname=Textiles
So they were - I hadn't seen the auction lots before. This item creeps me out a bit:- http://www.dnfa.com/search.asp?view=...eid=445466-664
the photo
and this:- http://www.dnfa.com/search.asp?view=...eid=445466-813
[Broadmoor Special Hospital] A View From black tracksuit top, embroidered with the Broadmoor Hospital logo

Made for the Control & Restraint training programme.
*cringe*

I also noticed this:- http://www.dnfa.com/search.asp?view=...3560&lotno=467 &uniqueid=445466-773

A black and yellow woollen scarf, with 'MENSA' and a logo knitted at the ends, approx. 195cm long (excluding the fringes)

Sir Jimmy had a high IQ and became a member of MENSA in 1977. He completed the IQ test at Broadmoor, locking himself into a room to complete it.

Provenance: From the estate of Sir Jimmy Savile. OBE, KCSG, LLD (1926-2011)

ADDITION TO THIS LOT:
Together with a MENSA tie
Thats a bit more information about the link to MENSA, since someone asked about that recently I think.
IzzyS is offline