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Old 06-02-2013, 23:20
Saltydog1955
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,910
That aint true, Caesarians were in fact named after Caesar.. which is how he was born. My mother also had one in 1964
Circumstances alter cases.
Maybe you were a bigger baby than I was, or your mother had a smaller pelvic opening. If my daughter had been bigger, I expect I would have had one too, just as my mother would.

Thats what I can't understand about this thread how you can have such strong tummy muscles that you can't give birth natural. I don't half envy this woman having strong tummy muscles as she won't have any back trouble.
Because if you try to manipulate and turn the child from the outside by hand, her stomach muscles might well be too strong to enable the midwife to do it. And as I've said over and over, but no one seems to be getting it is that if IT is having a breech baby, it's standard in the NHS to have a caesarian. If she's going private, she can have exactly what she asks - and will be paying for.

So they would have been invented by 1955 then
See above.

When a caesarian might be needed.

A caesarean section is usually carried out when a normal vaginal birth could put you or your unborn baby at risk, for example because:
your labour doesn't progress naturally
you go into premature labour
you have placenta praevia (where the placenta is low lying in the womb and covering part of the womb entrance)
you have a viral infection, such as a first attack of genital herpes
your baby is in the breech (feet first) position
Find out more about when a caesarean section is necessary.
Pregnant women are not immediately entitled to a caesarean section if they do not have any physical or mental need for it. If you ask for the operation, you'll be asked why you're requesting it and you'll be given information about the risks and benefits. You should be allowed to have a caesarean if, after discussion and support, you still want to have the operation.
A caesarean section is major surgery and many women opt for a vaginal birth after learning more about what the surgery involves.

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Caesare...roduction.aspx
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