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Can a 3D TV convert non 3D content to 3D?


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Old 25-04-2012, 17:23
anthpieface
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Thanks everybody for your replies.

I wasn't even aware that there were "shutter" or "passive" glasses, I thought that they were all the same

Also it says that the Internet Connection is via a WiFi dongle- what does mean? Anybody?

Thanks.
Hi just to correct my mistake passive glasses DO NOT flicker. However with my TV I have the choice of plugging in a lan cable or by buying a WIFI dongle, these enable you to connect to the internet or a home network. If you buy a smart TV you may be able to have extras such as Youtube, netflix or other types of on demand services. But it all goes down to what you want and can afford.
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Old 25-04-2012, 19:48
The Wizard
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Is 3D not just a novelty that will soon wear off?

When I tried viewing Sky 3D at my inlaws I found it not only gave me a stomping headache after about 10 minutes of watching but the picture was fuzzy and I spent most of the time analysing the picture rather than enjoying the film. Plus the fact the glasses were so expensive that we had to share them between us meaning half the people couldn't watch the movie because without glasses it's unwatchable to anyone else. But that was ok because after 10 minutes i'd had enough anyway as my head and eye sockets were throbbing with chronic eye strain.

I would suggest that before forking out money on one, first watch a full movie on one if you can or see if they'll let you try it out and take it back if your not happy. I think the only way to see if your tv is gonna be suitable is to try it at home for a couple of days. You can't tell by 5 minutes looking at a shop demo.
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Old 25-04-2012, 20:29
anthpieface
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Is 3D not just a novelty that will soon wear off?

When I tried viewing Sky 3D at my inlaws I found it not only gave me a stomping headache after about 10 minutes of watching but the picture was fuzzy and I spent most of the time analysing the picture rather than enjoying the film. Plus the fact the glasses were so expensive that we had to share them between us meaning half the people couldn't watch the movie because without glasses it's unwatchable to anyone else. But that was ok because after 10 minutes i'd had enough anyway as my head and eye sockets were throbbing with chronic eye strain.

I would suggest that before forking out money on one, first watch a full movie on one if you can or see if they'll let you try it out and take it back if your not happy. I think the only way to see if your tv is gonna be suitable is to try it at home for a couple of days. You can't tell by 5 minutes looking at a shop demo.
Hi Wizard
the 3DTV you watched was an active one like the one I have, The passive system uses cheaper and lighter glasses . without the flicker. However some critics of the passive system say the 3D effect is not as good and the pic is not full HD. I have watched a freinds passive TV and found it a more enjoyable experience. Im not saying the TV I brought is not any good, the picture is amazing however I rarely watch 3D because in hurts my eyes.

the link below looks at passive and active 3D

http://3dradar.techradar.com/3d-tech...est-24-05-2011
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Old 25-04-2012, 21:38
porkpie
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Thanks everybody for your replies.

I wasn't even aware that there were "shutter" or "passive" glasses, I thought that they were all the same

Also it says that the Internet Connection is via a WiFi dongle- what does mean? Anybody?

Thanks.
The tv will have a USB socket into which you will need to fit a dongle -but shop around.
The official Panasonic dongle is 70 but I did a bit of research and found a Netgear one on Amazon for 22.

If you have a network bridge that you used previously you could connect that to the ethernet socket on the tv just to test out what the set offers then you can decide if you really need a dongle
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Old 25-04-2012, 22:07
The Wizard
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The tv will have a USB socket into which you will need to fit a dongle -but shop around.
The official Panasonic dongle is 70 but I did a bit of research and found a Netgear one on Amazon for 22.

If you have a network bridge that you used previously you could connect that to the ethernet socket on the tv just to test out what the set offers then you can decide if you really need a dongle
Just had the same issue with my dad's tv. I could have used a spare router to bridge it but I don't think his O2 router allows you to play about with the settings to put it into bridge mode.

In the end we found the fastest and most economical solution was to buy a set of HomePlugs. Comet are currently selling Devolo for 49.99 which is as good as hard wiring but i'm sure there's cheaper makes available. Worth checking out. The advantage is they will work with any system and are faster than wireless and cheaper than buying a dongle.

Most tv's are only compatible with their own dongles which means if you change tv or the adapter packs up you'll have to fork out for a new one. An 85mbs homeplug is adequate to handle iplayer on HD programmes. They do 200mbs ones for about 20 more but as my router can only handle 100mbs max then it's pointless.
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Old 26-04-2012, 02:35
Richardcoulter
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Hi Wizard
the 3DTV you watched was an active one like the one I have, The passive system uses cheaper and lighter glasses . without the flicker. However some critics of the passive system say the 3D effect is not as good and the pic is not full HD. I have watched a freinds passive TV and found it a more enjoyable experience. Im not saying the TV I brought is not any good, the picture is amazing however I rarely watch 3D because in hurts my eyes.

the link below looks at passive and active 3D

http://3dradar.techradar.com/3d-tech...est-24-05-2011
Thank you.

The tv will have a USB socket into which you will need to fit a dongle -but shop around.
The official Panasonic dongle is 70 but I did a bit of research and found a Netgear one on Amazon for 22.

If you have a network bridge that you used previously you could connect that to the ethernet socket on the tv just to test out what the set offers then you can decide if you really need a dongle
If i've understood it correctly, the dongle is included with the TV

http://www.sainsburys.co.uk/sol/shop...=HP1&ID=180412

Will it just pick up the signal from my wifi and feed it into the TV?

As somebody who knows little about these things, it looks to be a good deal. Free delivery, free stand, free glasses, Freeview HD, 3D, LED and Nectar points too lol.
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Old 26-04-2012, 23:08
porkpie
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Just had the same issue with my dad's tv. I could have used a spare router to bridge it but I don't think his O2 router allows you to play about with the settings to put it into bridge mode.

.
Surely the bridge should just connect wirelessly to the router and then connect the bridge to the tv.
My router is more than 7 years old and I've never heard of needing to change to bridge mode.
PS3 , phones , tv ,disc players , computers all connect without needing to change anything

.



If i've understood it correctly, the dongle is included with the TV

http://www.sainsburys.co.uk/sol/shop...=HP1&ID=180412

Will it just pick up the signal from my wifi and feed it into the TV?

As somebody who knows little about these things, it looks to be a good deal. Free delivery, free stand, free glasses, Freeview HD, 3D, LED and Nectar points too lol.
It does seem to come with the dongle.
You'll connect it to the tv , then in setup mode it will find your router , you'll enter any required password and thats it.

Then when you use the Smart tv features of the set it should work seamlessly with the dongle connecting to the router each time you power up the set as you will have saved all the settings
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Old 27-04-2012, 14:24
Richardcoulter
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Thanks for your advice
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