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US Pace and UK Pace???


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Old 01-05-2012, 23:43
Cadiva
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I asked about this on another thread , but I still can't see what it means. So , for instance in the US they show a series once a week and in the UK twice a week? Why does it matter if you cannot see it in the US
It's nothing to do with the frequency of the broadcasts but the timing. Many US shows don't air on UK television for months after their original broadcast date. It's only since HBO and Sky Atlantic started showing things a few days after the original air date that meant two threads may not be needed.

But how many people who come on here watch the US version? About 3? Just put " no spoilers" in the title thread. I'm particularly talking about the Danish/Swedish dramas. It just seems a strange and unnecessary addition to the title
In the Cult section I would say most of us, also for a lot of US shows, most of us

I don't think that's very fair on the OP to be honest. Not everyone is up on the latest acronyms and things like that. I think there was a thread in GD not last week or something like that that was called something along the lines of "Really obvious things you've only just become aware of".

It may seem completely commonplace to many people but it doesn't mean it's commonplace to everyone
But pace isn't an acronym, it's a word and it's a fairly obvious one imho.

I watch everything US pace, I cannot stand having to wait for what can be months for some shows to air on UK TV. Plus a lot of US shows don't even air on UK TV at all.
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Old 02-05-2012, 00:52
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Your are all very naughty boys .
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Old 02-05-2012, 09:58
Lazlo Wolf
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Okay, so what do 'UK' and 'US' mean then?
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Old 02-05-2012, 10:40
dillkid
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Okay, so what do 'UK' and 'US' mean then?
UK=United Kingdom, US=United States... If you watch something on E4 about 5 months behind it's UK pace. If you download it online the day after it airs on say, CBS, it's US pace.
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Old 02-05-2012, 11:11
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Okay, so what do 'UK' and 'US' mean then?
I assume you're trying to be "witty" ?
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Old 02-05-2012, 19:43
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Yep all the while depriving the people who make the shows of any reward for their hard work. Do you also steal DVDs from HMV?

I can't believe anyone cannot figure out what US pace means, the education system in this country is a joke .
That's a bit uncalled for, I have CSE English.
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Old 03-05-2012, 12:12
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That's a bit uncalled for, I have CSE English.
I think it's more an Indictment against CSE English than against you.
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Old 03-05-2012, 13:22
bobcar
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Pace is just, well what it means.

1.
A rate of movement, especially in stepping, walking, etc.: to walk at a brisk pace of five miles an hour.
2.
A rate of activity, progress, growth, performance, etc.; tempo.
Yes "pace" is obviously the wrong word and it was clearly coined by someone with little knowledge of science or even English.

A more accurate word would be "offset" so "US offset" or "UK offset". The one problem I have with offset is offset from what? We ideally need a word to give an absolute position in time probably someone else can come up with a better word.

Having said the above people do understand what is meant by US Pace etc even though the term is completely incorrect so I'm not actually suggesting we change it but that we have to live with it.
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Old 03-05-2012, 13:49
Cadiva
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Yes "pace" is obviously the wrong word and it was clearly coined by someone with little knowledge of science or even English.

Having said the above people do understand what is meant by US Pace etc even though the term is completely incorrect so I'm not actually suggesting we change it but that we have to live with it.
Pace is being used in a completely accurate manner ie - he kept pace with the people in front of him - meaning he kept up to time.
A UK pace thread is keeping up with the UK schedule, a US pace thread is keeping up with the US schedule.
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Old 03-05-2012, 14:19
bobcar
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Pace is being used in a completely accurate manner ie - he kept pace with the people in front of him - meaning he kept up to time.
A UK pace thread is keeping up with the UK schedule, a US pace thread is keeping up with the US schedule.
No UK pace is usually the same as US pace i.e. one show a week (not always as in BBT). If you were a scientist, mathematician or engineer this would be clear to you though you can see it just from the English.

Pace refers to the rate of movement not the position. For a typical show on Sky the US will be at a pace of 1 show per week as will the UK however the UK will have an offset of say 3 days compared to the US thus you could talk about the UK or US offset.

Using your words "he kept pace with the people in front of him" the UK is keeping pace it just happens to be a couple of days behind.

EDIT: To use your runner analogy:

Runners A and B are in the London marathon, because of the queues runner A is 1 mile ahead of runner B by the time runner B goes through the start. If the distance of 1 mile is maintained throughout the race (more accurately the time difference rather than distance difference) then runner B is keeping pace with runner A they just have a different offset and absolute position, this is the situation with the US and the UK for much of Sky's new programming. (Of course both offset and pace can vary though for new material pace usually doesn't, ideally we would use a would that includes both - probably just UK and US "showings" would be best).
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Old 03-05-2012, 14:30
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Yep all the while depriving the people who make the shows of any reward for their hard work. Do you also steal DVDs from HMV?
If you are in the UK and you visit a website that streams US television and you watch said television you are not breaking the law. The person who put it online broke the law (and the website itself is breaking the law). If you "illegally" download television shows you are not breaking the law (the person who made it available to download is breaking the law). Buying them illegally is obviously illegal.

Legality aside we in the UK who do watch US television shows after they've aired in the US are not depriving anyone. The show was produced for the US audience, the shows get the money from advertisors, who get there money from americans. The companies only make a little extra on the side by selling the show to other countries networks (but sometimes don't syfy us--> syfy uk!). So as i said if we watch a US show the subsequent day after its US airing were not depriving anyone as the show got its audience and the advertisers already got there message out.

But illegal streaming is benefical for US shows and networks as it builds up an international fan base who buy merchendise which again earns them some money.

But with the UK not getting US shows months after their airing or even not at all there then must be a way to see the shows we love. Because if they don't air for months (or not at all) then there is no DVD release meaning the only way is to stream/download.

I don't mind saying that I do stream online US shows and the number of people here in the UK who do is increasing but like me they also buy the DVDs and other merchendise so the companies arn't losing money. So the way i see it everyones happy at the end of the day.
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Old 03-05-2012, 14:53
dsrichard
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It is trivial and legal to watch US shows at US pace without downloading any copyright-infringing material.

You just install the security software Hotspot Shield which gives you a temporary US IP address and watch directly from the US channels' web sites.

Nothing illegal. Nothing bad. No need for moral high ground from people who don't understand how to do this trivial security process.
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Old 03-05-2012, 15:52
bazellis
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It is trivial and legal to watch US shows at US pace without downloading any copyright-infringing material.

You just install the security software Hotspot Shield which gives you a temporary US IP address and watch directly from the US channels' web sites.

Nothing illegal. Nothing bad. No need for moral high ground from people who don't understand how to do this trivial security process.
Do you have a link to a more detailed explanation of how to do this?
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Old 03-05-2012, 17:41
Cadiva
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Using your words "he kept pace with the people in front of him" the UK is keeping pace it just happens to be a couple of days behind.
There doesn't need to be any scientific analogy though, the word works perfectly well within its actual meaning in English.

b. The rate of speed at which an activity or movement proceeds
or
3. To set or regulate the rate of speed for

It can't be "keeping pace" if it's two days behind. To keep pace you have to be running at the same time, hence why the use of pace works perfectly well within this context.

If you are watching the show as it airs in the US you are keeping pace with the US showing. If you watch it one day, one week or six months later as it shows on UK TV, then you're keeping pace with the UK showing.
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Old 03-05-2012, 18:56
bobcar
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There doesn't need to be any scientific analogy though, the word works perfectly well within its actual meaning in English.

b. The rate of speed at which an activity or movement proceeds
or
3. To set or regulate the rate of speed for

It can't be "keeping pace" if it's two days behind. To keep pace you have to be running at the same time, hence why the use of pace works perfectly well within this context.

If you are watching the show as it airs in the US you are keeping pace with the US showing. If you watch it one day, one week or six months later as it shows on UK TV, then you're keeping pace with the UK showing.
You are not understanding what "rate" means in the definitions, that's why I made the science point as anyone from those disciplines would understand immediately.

"Rate" in that context means the rate at which something changes or is used, in the case of running distance/time for scheduling number-of-shows/time. So for running 6 mph pace is 6 mph pace whether you've done 1 mile or 20. In the case of TV scheduling the pace is for example 1 show per week (1-show/1-week) irrespective of whether you are ahead or behind.

If you watch in the UK say 2 days behind you are "keeping pace" with the US, you are at a different point but the pace is the same and you are "keeping up".

As I said I'm not suggesting changing the terms "US pace" and "UK pace" as most people understood what was meant I was just pointing out that "pace" is not being correctly used and only raised the issue because of this thread - I noticed the error as soon as I saw the thread titles but saw no point in commenting.
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Old 03-05-2012, 21:09
srhDS
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The US v UK thing is irrelevant. The "offset" is a red herring in this discussion.

This definition is what matters.
"3. To set or regulate the rate of speed for"

The Pace we are talking about is the pace of discussion in a forum thread and it is set (or regulated) by the Pace of the tv show being discussed. If the show airs every two weeks in the states then the US paced thread will also be paced at two weeks. The same show could air weekly in the UK but the US paced thread doesn't care about that. Shows often have a different Pace in the UK and the US but as their respective threads on the forum are paced to their own show this doesn't really matter.
Pace is as good a word to discribe the relationship between a show and its thread as any other word. The thread keeps pace with the show, simple.
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Old 03-05-2012, 22:49
Cadiva
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The thread keeps pace with the show, simple.
Thank you, that's exactly the point I was making.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:10
bazellis
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A simple thread gone mad
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:34
bobcar
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Thank you, that's exactly the point I was making.
Except that neither you not srhDS for whatever reason understand what pace or speed means. They are rates not positions.

Apart from encouraging you to learn a little physics which would make the difference between a rate and a position clear there's really not much more I can say, I've given it my best shot and I'll just have to accept that some people are unwilling to learn.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:36
bobcar
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Pace is as good a word to discribe the relationship between a show and its thread as any other word. The thread keeps pace with the show, simple.
Yes but for most Sky shows on first viewing the UK showing keeps pace with the US showing, it's just a little behind but it still keeps pace. If you can understand this you should be able to understand why pace is the wrong word to use, it's no big deal and I only mentioned it because of this thread but it is the incorrect term.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:52
srhDS
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Yes but for most Sky shows on first viewing the UK showing keeps pace with the US showing, it's just a little behind but it still keeps pace. If you can understand this you should be able to understand why pace is the wrong word to use, it's no big deal and I only mentioned it because of this thread but it is the incorrect term.
But the Paces of the shows on different channels is not what we are talking about. the term UK Pace applies to a thread discussing a tv show. The Pace of the discussion matches the Pace of the show. This is to avoid someone watching at US Pace out pacing the discussion in a UK paced thread and introducing spoilers.
Yes UK shows on Sky tend to keep Pace with US airings but this is a separate discussion. Generally a US show airs over a longer timeframe with breaks and UK airings tend to start later and have a quicker pace. But the term Pace as being discussed in this thread is not referring to varying show schedules. We are talking about a discussion on a show.

The rate / speed / pace (whatever word you choose) of the discussion is based on the rate / speed / pace of the show.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:00
daniel9624
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Hilarious thread, thanks OP, just been wetting myself!
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:09
bobcar
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The rate / speed / pace (whatever word you choose) of the discussion is based on the rate / speed / pace of the show.
That's the point, they aren't. They are based upon the "position" in terms of which episodes have been shown not on the pace of the show which is often the same for both sides of the Atlantic with one show per week being the pace. You discuss episode 19 after episode 19 has been shown not after it reaches 1 show per week which is pretty much the pace for both sides.

As I said before and now for the last time anyone with a science based background would immediately see that pace is the wrong would as it is a rate rather than a position, that doesn't mean though that you have to be good at science to get this point just that it makes it easier.

I wish I'd never said anything now, I was never tempted in the actual threads I just thought "pace is the wrong word but so what I know what they mean" but because this thread was about "what does that mean?" I foolishly did point out it was the wrong word. If I was starting threads I would say "US showing" and "UK showing" but it is no big deal.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:23
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This is a joke, right?
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Old 04-05-2012, 14:26
srhDS
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This is a joke, right?
This thread needs more ghosts.
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