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Old 08-05-2012, 09:24
Nelsonator15
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If you fail a module in your uni course (1st year), will you still be able to move on to Year 2? It's something that's played on my mind for a little while because I don't feel too confident about the exam for one of my modules tomorrow afternoon, and I didn't do very well on the previous test and assignment. I'm pretty sure I can pass my other modules (I already got an A+ in one of them) but I'm just wondering if failing a single module is enough to stop you continuing?

Any help would be appreciated.
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:29
JordanT91
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If you fail a module in your uni course (1st year), will you still be able to move on to Year 2? It's something that's played on my mind for a little while because I don't feel too confident about the exam for one of my modules tomorrow afternoon, and I didn't do very well on the previous test and assignment. I'm pretty sure I can pass my other modules (I already got an A+ in one of them) but I'm just wondering if failing a single module is enough to stop you continuing?

Any help would be appreciated.
I think it is. A few people failed a module in my first year. They had to retake the assessment. Because most of them failed it again, they had to repeat the year. Most of those who did fail just left.
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:34
soulboy77
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It really depends on the course, if the module is core or not and the credits you need. In short you need to ask the Uni as we can't really give you a definitive answer here.
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:35
Nigel Goodwin
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I think it really depends on the course, and on the Uni - but as long as you get really good marks on the rest of your year you can probably make up enough to stay on the course.

My daughter's doing a four year Masters degree, and at the end of the second year all those who weren't maintaining a high enough standard were dropped back to the three year Bsc course. I suspect failing a module would mean you couldn't possibly score high enough to stay on the Masters?.
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:54
elliecat
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It depends on University and the degree programme and whether the module is a core module. Where I work they have to achieve an overall average of 40% over their 120 credits, they also need to pass all their core modules. They can fail an optional module and still go into the 2nd year if they have passed all their core modules.

You need to check with your institution though as they all do things differently even different departments do things differently.
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:56
Mumof3
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Good luck for your exam tomorrow. To give yourself the best chance of passing, try and focus on tomorrow's challenge, rather than getting distracted by the 'what ifs', and certainly, log off digital spy for the next 24hrs, as it's not going to help you reach your immediate goal of passing.
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Old 08-05-2012, 10:22
Nelsonator15
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It depends on University and the degree programme and whether the module is a core module. Where I work they have to achieve an overall average of 40% over their 120 credits, they also need to pass all their core modules. They can fail an optional module and still go into the 2nd year if they have passed all their core modules.

You need to check with your institution though as they all do things differently even different departments do things differently.
Yeah that's how my uni is actually, now that I think of it, and it is indeed a core module (not to mention a compulsory module next year). So far my average grade is a D- (thanks mainly to an assignment the likes of which we'd never covered in lectures/seminars but that's beside the point ) but the exam counts for 60% so if I can at least get a D on that I should be safe. It's a shame that I'm having to aim so low for this module, but I'm partly responsible so I'll work to improve on it in future.

Anyway:

Good luck for your exam tomorrow. To give yourself the best chance of passing, try and focus on tomorrow's challenge, rather than getting distracted by the 'what ifs', and certainly, log off digital spy for the next 24hrs, as it's not going to help you reach your immediate goal of passing.
Yes I certainly shall! Thanks for the advice guys.

ETA: Knowing my luck I'll probably learn more from reading my lecturer's eBook over the summer holidays after the exam than I ever did from the lectures themselves lol.
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Old 08-05-2012, 10:33
BK.
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Depends on your course/uni. Ask your course supervisor, it differs.

At my old uni, you had to pass ALL modules. If you failed one module but still managed to pass the year it was tough titty, you had to resit the module. At my current uni, as long as you pass the year they're not bothered if you fail a module.

Ask them.
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Old 08-05-2012, 12:02
Little Nell
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You'll have been given a copy of the assessment regulations, probably online, so have a look. Everything's completely transparent these days so it'll be easy enough to find out.
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Old 08-05-2012, 12:05
21stCenturyBoy
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At my University, you get to fail up to 30 Credits before you fail outright and have to retake a year.

Normally, it's just re-taking the specific module again (or even just the assignment that caused you to fail the module- so if you passed the essay but not the exam you'd just resit the exam, same practice if you failed the essay)
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Old 08-05-2012, 12:10
Gogfumble
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At my uni you had to pass them all to be able to progress. But had chance to retake the assessments (but only get a D passing grade) in the Summer holidays. If it was an exam based assessment you had to go back and sit the exam. If it was coursework based, they sent the new assingment out to you to complete and then send back.
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Old 08-05-2012, 12:57
cnbcwatcher
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If you fail a module in your uni course (1st year), will you still be able to move on to Year 2? It's something that's played on my mind for a little while because I don't feel too confident about the exam for one of my modules tomorrow afternoon, and I didn't do very well on the previous test and assignment. I'm pretty sure I can pass my other modules (I already got an A+ in one of them) but I'm just wondering if failing a single module is enough to stop you continuing?

Any help would be appreciated.
In my university it is. I failed a few modules in first and second year and I either had to repeat the exams in August or if I failed those repeat the whole year.
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Old 08-05-2012, 13:04
KidPoker
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It depends on how the year is graded. Check the weighing of marks in your first year. It is available in the initial handout they first give you, or available online. I'm surprised you actually are not aware of this and it is May already...

Some courses literally waste your time in first year and you need a bare minimum to even pass the first year, which may not even count towards your degree classification. Other courses are more strict. and include a percentage of year 1 when classifying degrees.

It completely depends, but this is information you should absolutely know. I know at my university you had to pass all modules in year one to get into year 2, yet year one did not even count towards my degree.
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Old 08-05-2012, 13:22
Voynich
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You'll usually be offered a resit in the summer. Don't think about that just now. Do you have personal tutor? I think you should arrange an appointment with them to discuss it after the exams. They're there to help (and paid too! ). They want you to pass and move on to next year.
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Old 08-05-2012, 13:37
elliecat
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just speak to someone in your department, your personal tutor or the Administrator and they will tell you what your departments procedure is, they will also let you know about options to retake etc. Also don't go into the exam thinking I only need to get x, go in and try your best. People on here can give you advice and tell you what their University does but it may not be the same procedures for yours. All too often I get students saying "well x said this or that" when x belongs to a different department with different progression requirements.
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Old 08-05-2012, 14:34
salo
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To be honest it depends on the lecturers making the exam paper as well as the uni. Some lecturers have a tendency to be lenient if they know you have a reasonable grasp but just do badly in the exam whereas some universities have a tendency to fail the person if they are borderline. Where I did my undergrad they admitted they (specifically my degree) had a high failure rate for 1st year in some core modules (with an easier repeat exam) to ensure that the people who continued into 2nd year were committed to the course rather than just there to get any degree.

It may be that your exam questions suit you better than previous assignments did and you can manage to pass without any problems. If you so need to resit the exam, make sure you get in touch with the module coordinator and possibly also some of the lecturers. They will appreciate that you ask for help (though they may not make it obvious), they will have a much better opinion of you if you ask and should be able to help (their opinion is important as they mark your work!).

Good luck
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Old 08-05-2012, 14:50
elliecat
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To be honest it depends on the lecturers making the exam paper as well as the uni. Some lecturers have a tendency to be lenient if they know you have a reasonable grasp but just do badly in the exam whereas some universities have a tendency to fail the person if they are borderline. Where I did my undergrad they admitted they (specifically my degree) had a high failure rate for 1st year in some core modules (with an easier repeat exam) to ensure that the people who continued into 2nd year were committed to the course rather than just there to get any degree.

It may be that your exam questions suit you better than previous assignments did and you can manage to pass without any problems. If you so need to resit the exam, make sure you get in touch with the module coordinator and possibly also some of the lecturers. T]hey will appreciate that you ask for help (though they may not make it obvious), they will have a much better opinion of you if you ask and should be able to help (their opinion is important as they mark your work!).

Good luck
Your bottom bit is rubbish. Exams are marked anonymously so lecturers can't favour some students over others when marking. Students may not realise that the marker doesn't know whose paper it is until the exams have been marked and sent back to the administrators to deal with who then open up the sealed name bits to see whose paper it is. If they are not stuck down when we initially recieve them to sort through before they go to be marked we stick them down. They also get second marked to make sure that it has been marked fairly and for years 2 and 3 they go to external markers. I am in the process of sorting through exam papers and in all my time working here I have never heard of a lecturer marking someone up because they bothered to ask questions. If a someone is borderline then everything gets looked at not just coursework marks, attendance does as well.

It is not in the institutions or the departments best interest to just pass anyone or make papers easier to get a higher pass rate as that leads to problems further on in other modules when students don't understand as the courses and exam papers were dumbed down to manipulate marks.
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Old 08-05-2012, 15:26
salo
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Your bottom bit is rubbish. Exams are marked anonymously so lecturers can't favour some students over others when marking.

I am in the process of sorting through exam papers and in all my time working here I have never heard of a lecturer marking someone up because they bothered to ask questions. If a someone is borderline then everything gets looked at not just coursework marks, attendance does as well.
I maybe didn't explain it well. (but it's not rubbish about about marking more favourably - it may not be common place (or nice) but having worked in universities for over 10 years I know it can happen). I'm not talking about making a difference between giving someone pass when they deserve a fail but just a difference of 1 or 2 marks (not 1-2%) so instead of borderline fail it is borderline pass - it does happen- why else would they be taking attendance into account?

In terms of asking lecturers questions, I meant they will be willing to spend time going over work with you so you can understand it - obviously there are standards to reach but I've always found that they are more willing to help when you ask questions when you have issues rather than waiting until the last minute so I would recommend going to see the lecturers if/after failing an exam rather than waiting until time of repeat exam.
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