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Doctor Who 50th Anniversary to be in 3D


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Old 13-02-2013, 14:35
Collins1965
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A 1 hour 3D special does not make up for a total lack of series 8 imo.
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Old 13-02-2013, 14:36
mossy2103
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They get it in the neck either way. Launch themselves full throttle at the latest and greatest and it is "wasting licence fee on something not everyone can see" or "unfair competition with the private sector" etc. Leave it late and it is "the BBC should keep up to date!" "I pay my licence fee why isn't everything a direct brain hologram yet?" etc.
And to be fair to the BBC, they are still only trialling 3D on a limited basis, recognising perhaps that it is not yet a mature consumer product and that it still even now remains a niche product (a mere 8% I believe have 3D TVs, and of that figure we are not told exactly how many actively watch 3D content or bought the model in order to sample 3D content
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Old 13-02-2013, 14:45
nebogipfel
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And to be fair to the BBC, they are still only trialling 3D on a limited basis, recognising perhaps that it is not yet a mature consumer product and that it still even now remains a niche product (a mere 8% I believe have 3D TVs, and of that figure we are not told exactly how many actively watch 3D content or bought the model in order to sample 3D content
Yep. I think they're doing it the right way. I know the BBC already know that the current 3D isn't the future, but I don't blame them for giving it a go.

In our household we have 3D because we needed a new telly regardless and the best ones in our price range in 37 inches all had 3D. Which I expect is a common thing. We would never have thrown out a working tv just to get 3D.
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Old 13-02-2013, 14:58
mossy2103
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Yep. I think they're doing it the right way. I know the BBC already know that the current 3D isn't the future, but I don't blame them for giving it a go.
Well, as part of their public service commitments they are charged with developing and trialling new technology (or words to that effect).

In our household we have 3D because we needed a new telly regardless and the best ones in our price range in 37 inches all had 3D. Which I expect is a common thing. We would never have thrown out a working tv just to get 3D.
I also have my suspicions that this may be the case for a number of people.
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Old 13-02-2013, 15:19
Lulz77
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HD production had to wait for the studios and production suites in Cardiff to be upgraded to HD. The Tardis interior had to be rebuilt for HD as well.

This all takes time and money of course.
But werent the specials the first episodes in 3D? Does that mean they rebuilt the TARDIS for just 5 episodes before the new TARDIS came along?
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Old 13-02-2013, 15:48
CD93
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But werent the specials the first episodes in 3D? Does that mean they rebuilt the TARDIS for just 5 episodes before the new TARDIS came along?
( 2005 TARDIS didn't feature in the specials - bar the odd 'wide' clip in End of Time then the regeneration. )
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Old 13-02-2013, 16:01
billykubrick
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Oops thanks for correctly my massively inaccurate post

Does anyone know if Doctor Who was one of the first series to start being broadcast in colour?
Well I am probably older than you!
Wimbledon was the first BBC programme to be transmitted in colour in 1967.

Wikipedia says:

Some British television programmes, particularly those made by or for ITC Entertainment, were shot on color film before the introduction of color television to the UK, for the purpose of sales to U.S. networks. The first British show to be made in color was the drama series The Adventures of Sir Lancelot (1956–57), which was initially made in black and white but later shot in color for sale to the NBC network in the United States. Other British color television programmes include Stingray (1964–1965), which was the first British TV show to be filmed entirely in color, Thunderbirds (1965–1966) and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967–1968). However, most UK series predominantly made using videoptape, such as Doctor Who (1963–89; 2005–present) did not begin color production until later, with the first color Doctor Who episodes not airing until 1970.

That would be of course the first of the Jon Pertwee episodes.
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Old 13-02-2013, 16:10
nebogipfel
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Sir Lancelot starred William Russell (Ian Chesterton)! I expect he was even more dashing and admirable in colour than black and white. Especially with his huge sword glinting in the sunlight. Just imagine that in 3D.
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Old 13-02-2013, 20:31
gingerfreak
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Ha ha ha!
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Old 13-02-2013, 22:07
jimbo
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To date, all 3D has been simulcast on BBC HD, and the 2D/SD/HD has been on BBC One/HD.

As it stands, they'll gave to take over BBC Two HD (which is replacing BBC HD) for an hour. Not ideal, but needs must.
Given that BBC HD is supposed to be closing at the end of March, they will not have a channel to put this on unless they keep BBC HD and start BBC2 HD - ie moving BBC HD to a new satellite frequency.

Or, are we to wait another year for BBC2 to go HD? Surely not!
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Old 13-02-2013, 22:37
nebogipfel
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Given that BBC HD is supposed to be closing at the end of March, they will not have a channel to put this on unless they keep BBC HD and start BBC2 HD - ie moving BBC HD to a new satellite frequency.

Or, are we to wait another year for BBC2 to go HD? Surely not!
Or just hijack BBC 2HD for an hour and suggest BBC 2 viewers switch to the SD channel for that hour? No big deal, surely?
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Old 13-02-2013, 22:54
jimbo
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i would hope not. If BBC2 HD is to launch, that is how it should stay. If anyone knows what is planned please can you let us know?

What has been announced this week, add that to what has been announced about BBC HD - that it is closing and BBC2 HD starting - something does not add up here. Please can someone clarify.

Thanks.
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Old 13-02-2013, 23:21
kyllerbuzcut
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So why exactly can't bbc1hd show it?
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Old 13-02-2013, 23:29
GDK
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So why exactly can't bbc1hd show it?
Because BBC1 HD would be occupied with the 2D HD broadcast. When the BBC did 3D before they used the BBC HD channel for the 3D simulcast.
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Old 14-02-2013, 00:08
jimbo
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Because BBC1 HD would be occupied with the 2D HD broadcast. When the BBC did 3D before they used the BBC HD channel for the 3D simulcast.
Exactly. That is why I want to know where they are going to broadcast the 3D version with BbC1 HD showing the HD 2D version. BBC2 HD will carry whatever is on BBC2 at that time. Thanks.
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Old 14-02-2013, 07:43
mossy2103
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Well it looks like the existing fifth HD slot on DTT still has no takers, so it is possible (only possible mind) that the slot will remain vacant and only utilised by the BBC for specific programming via a Red Button service (similar to the Red Button Olympic coverage).
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Old 14-02-2013, 07:48
kyllerbuzcut
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Does it HAVE to be a separate broadcast? Won't the 3d broadcast just look like normal on a normal screen? I obviously don't get how it works, as you can all probably tell is it because you would see a blurry screen on a normal TV, from the 3d broadcast, due to the left eye image/right eye image? I thought it didn't work like that anymore.
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Old 14-02-2013, 08:37
delroy14
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Does it HAVE to be a separate broadcast? Won't the 3d broadcast just look like normal on a normal screen? I obviously don't get how it works, as you can all probably tell is it because you would see a blurry screen on a normal TV, from the 3d broadcast, due to the left eye image/right eye image? I thought it didn't work like that anymore.
yes it does if you dont have a 3d tv you will get 2 almost identical pictures side by side, a 3d tv takes these 2 pics and then either (depending on tv) shows one then the other very fast the glasses do the opposite, or shows the 2 together with opposed polarity (very dr who lol)
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Old 14-02-2013, 09:12
nebogipfel
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i would hope not. If BBC2 HD is to launch, that is how it should stay. If anyone knows what is planned please can you let us know?

What has been announced this week, add that to what has been announced about BBC HD - that it is closing and BBC2 HD starting - something does not add up here. Please can someone clarify.

Thanks.
I don't really see what the problem would be. The BBC just put an announcement on the BBC2HD channel saying "As a one off and only for the next hour this channel will not show BBC2 programmes. We are showing the 3D version of the Doctor Who special. If you would like to watch the BBC2 programme instead please retune to our BBC2SD channel for the next hour."

I doubt it would result in rioting in the streets. Unless one single hours worth of Dad's Army and old Horizon repeats really must be viewed in HD and nothing but HD.
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Old 14-02-2013, 11:35
mossy2103
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I don't really see what the problem would be. The BBC just put an announcement on the BBC2HD channel saying "As a one off and only for the next hour this channel will not show BBC2 programmes. We are showing the 3D version of the Doctor Who special. If you would like to watch the BBC2 programme instead please retune to our BBC2SD channel for the next hour."

I doubt it would result in rioting in the streets.
There will be much wailing and gnashing of teeth ..... the Daily Mail will be incandescent with rage and will call for the BBC to be closed down (ok, nothing new there).

But seriously, didn't the BBC do a similar thing with another 3D programme last year?
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Old 14-02-2013, 12:52
kyllerbuzcut
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Maybe it will be do able then. Can't I still have a riot in the street though?
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Old 14-02-2013, 12:56
nebogipfel
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There will be much wailing and gnashing of teeth ..... the Daily Mail will be incandescent with rage and will call for the BBC to be closed down (ok, nothing new there).

But seriously, didn't the BBC do a similar thing with another 3D programme last year?
Maybe. Don't know. After March , however, the BBC won't have their "spare" BBC HD channel to do that with because it will have been repurposed as BBC2HD.

But BBC One HD uses the technique every single day. Whenever a regional show comes on, you need to switch to the SD version and then back to HD after.

Inside Out, for example, on HD is some randomly selected variant from somewhere other than where you live. You switch to SD to get the local version and flip back again after.

Or you write an angry letter to your MP about it or something
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Old 14-02-2013, 13:20
GDK
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Does it HAVE to be a separate broadcast? Won't the 3d broadcast just look like normal on a normal screen? I obviously don't get how it works, as you can all probably tell is it because you would see a blurry screen on a normal TV, from the 3d broadcast, due to the left eye image/right eye image? I thought it didn't work like that anymore.
Unfortunately, Yes. At least the way the BBC does it. When I switched my 2D only TV to look at Mr Stink in 3D over Christmas what I got was two horizontally squashed images side-by-side.

Unlike previous introductions of some new TV features like colour and NICAM (stereo) sound there appears to have been no attempt to make the 3D version backwards compatible. Probably because 3D occupies significantly greater bandwidth than 2D anyway because of the extra information packed into the signal for the second eye's view.
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Old 14-02-2013, 13:24
mossy2103
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But BBC One HD uses the technique every single day. Whenever a regional show comes on, you need to switch to the SD version and then back to HD after.

Inside Out, for example, on HD is some randomly selected variant from somewhere other than where you live. You switch to SD to get the local version and flip back again after.
The difference there is that generally the regional programming won't be in HD anyway, so the viewer misses nothing by switching to the SD variant

Not that this worries me - I shall be watching DW on BBC one HD at that time.
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Old 14-02-2013, 13:29
GDK
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Maybe. Don't know. After March , however, the BBC won't have their "spare" BBC HD channel to do that with because it will have been repurposed as BBC2HD.

But BBC One HD uses the technique every single day. Whenever a regional show comes on, you need to switch to the SD version and then back to HD after.

Inside Out, for example, on HD is some randomly selected variant from somewhere other than where you live. You switch to SD to get the local version and flip back again after.

Or you write an angry letter to your MP about it or something
I don't think it's a big deal. BBC2 is temporarily "re-purposed" and shows BBC1 programmes instead of its own every time there's a big event like a General Election or the Olympics.

Surely the "Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special" counts as a big event.
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