Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 
 

Worst Non-Fiction Books You've Read?


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-02-2013, 21:09
Residents Fan
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 4,366

The worst books on science history, art, politics, etc.
you've had the misfortune to read?


Hollywood versus America, by Michael Medved.
Granted, I didn't agree with Medved's politics, but
I thought it was badly written and full of
internal contradictions- one section argued that violent
Hollywood movies were causing violence in the
US- then a few pages later Medved stated
real-world violence in the US was declining!
Residents Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 10-02-2013, 21:51
InsideSoap
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Summer Bay
Posts: 5,795
Jeremy Kyle - I'm Only Being Honest. I cannot stand this odious vile man but I read this out the library a few years ago. From up on his high horse he spouts out rubbish about how to improve Britain whilst telling us bits and pieces about his own life. One of the worst books I have ever read.
InsideSoap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 21:53
stud u like
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: The Sunny Side Of The Street
Posts: 37,594
A rather smelly book about Crowley. It stank the house out and went in the bin.
stud u like is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2013, 01:38
wombat18
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Scotland
Posts: 728
I can only think of autobiographies but I've read a good few dodgy ones.

Once, during a fit of madness, I bought Katie Price's first autobiography. I don't know why because I don't even like her and never have. I think it was on sale. Unsurprisingly it was absolutely awful.

I've also read a few memoirs which turned out to be drivel.
wombat18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2013, 21:28
Residents Fan
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 4,366
A rather smelly book about Crowley. It stank the house out and went in the bin.

Is that Crowley as in "Controversial Occultist
Aleister Crowley?"

I remember being disappointed by "The Modern
Weird Tale" by S.T. Joshi. While the sections
on Ramsey Campbell and Shirley Jackson were superb, a lot of the book was fully of crude sniping and poor arguments. For instance, while I would normally
agree with Joshi that William Peter Blatty is a poor writer, Joshi spent several pages attacking not Blatty's fiction, but rather Blatty's religious beliefs. This is the sort of poor criticism one normally learns to avoid in college ( readers bought Joshi's book for its assessment of horror writers' literary merit, not for a discussion of its religious viewpoint).

Also, Joshi spent a huge amount of venom on Stephen King. While I don't think all King's work is perfect and should be above criticism, you really got the sense that Joshi has an extraordinarily intense dislike of King's work:

King’s writing, considered abstractly, is a mixture of cheap sentiment, naïve moral polarizations between valiant heroes and wooden villains, hackneyed, implausible, and ill-explained supernatural phenomena, a plain, bland, easy-to-read style with just the right number of scatological and sexual profanities to titillate his middle-class audience, and a subscribing to the conventional morality of common people.
Residents Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2013, 12:58
Loz_Fraggle
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,410
Danny Dyer's autobiography, it made my eyes bleed.
Loz_Fraggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2013, 16:08
goldberry1
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northern England
Posts: 2,025
I recently had a book out of the library (some of us actually still do this) which seemed quite interesting by the cover and the index. It was a man who hiked all over the place in this country and abroad. It turns out he was an academic on some sort of spiritual quest or pilgrimage, and I couldn't make head nor tail about what he was going on about. Even the few black and white pictures were odd - close up views of a couple of boulders and nothing to say where it was. It was so uninteresting I can't even remember the name or the author. Just goes to show that you can't always 'judge a book by its cover.'
goldberry1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2013, 18:02
phylo_roadking
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: in yo' mamma
Posts: 16,500
"Grey Wolf" by Gerard Williams and Simon Dunstan.

This gives excrement a bad name.
phylo_roadking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2013, 18:22
Viridiana
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,299
I bought at a charity shop a a book called "Strange Days" by one of jim Morrison's girlfriends.
I should have known better to buy a book of someone that called herself Patricia Keneally-Morrison, but nothing prepared me for what I've read, what a nutter. A total fantasist.
It should have been under fiction.
Viridiana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-02-2013, 20:23
Johnbee
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,091
It is a great pity that one can not get a good book about Russia or China in Britain. One I read a couple of years ago about Chairman Mao was simply a total rubbishing job, and one about Kruschev who is an interesting man, by Willam Taubman, seemed to be written as a primer for schoolchildren whose title ought to b 'Why all Rusians are evil and bad'. It does not even mention Krushchev hammering his shoe at the UN after the Gary Powers incident. I suppose the publisher was scared that we might like K. for that.
Actually the most unreadable non fiction book ever written is The Seven Pillars Of Wisdom. Don't try it, you'll die.
Johnbee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-02-2013, 21:27
Residents Fan
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 4,366
It is a great pity that one can not get a good book about Russia or China in Britain. One I read a couple of years ago about Chairman Mao was simply a total rubbishing job, and one about Kruschev who is an interesting man, by Willam Taubman, seemed to be written as a primer for schoolchildren whose title ought to b 'Why all Rusians are evil and bad'. It does not even mention Krushchev hammering his shoe at the UN after the Gary Powers incident. I suppose the publisher was scared that we might like K. for that.
Didn't the Taubman book get lotsa good reviews and
win a Pulitzer Prize? Seems like people thought
it was a good history book.

Back to S.T. Joshi... I've really gone off his work after
I came across this appalling 1993 interview with him
on the old alt.horror.cthulhu group. Joshi describes
Clark Ashton Smith and Robert E. Howard as
" two-bit hack writers who never amounted
to anything and never will" and then says this:

(Robert M.) Price: Howard held the gun to his own head.

[Audience laughs.]

Joshi: Yeah, yeah. I only wish Howard had held the gun to his head a little _earlier_.


https://groups.google.com/forum/?fro...I/8vGrLfdGU-0J
Residents Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-02-2013, 15:24
Mrs Mackintosh
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,743
I was flicking through Justin Lee Collins autobiography in Waterstones one day (this was before he was disgraced as a controlling monster). It was such rubbish. There was a whole chapter about him buying a Chicago Town Pizza. What a waste of a tree.
Mrs Mackintosh is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 19:40.