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Should I "upgrade"(?) my router?


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Old 01-03-2013, 14:01
Happy_Chappy
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I've had a Thomson TG585 v7 router for many years - it was the router originally supplied when I first joined Plusnet and I've not had any problems with it at all. I've just changed my Plusnet package as my old one has been discontinued and the advertised speed was higher (an "up to" so I know it's not guaranteed). I don't really know anything about routers, but I thought it was worth asking if my new package (since I'm signing up for another 12 months) came with a new router in case this would be better (more up to date, compatible with higher speeds? is that even relevant? no idea!). Anyway, they've offered me a Technicolor TG582n for 5.99 - I figure it's worth getting now anyway because I could always just keep it in case my Thomson dies, but I was wondering if anyone could explain whether using the new Technicolor router would actually be better? What's the difference? Is it an "upgrade" or just a newer model, no better than the Thomson?

or maybe should I just not tempt fate and keep the Thomson going since it's always worked well!

Thanks
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Old 01-03-2013, 15:15
chrisjr
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I'd be tempted to install the new router. From what I can see the old one is only WiFi G standard the new one is WiFi N standard. So that would improve the WiFi speed if nothing else. No idea if the WiFi coverage would be any better or worse though.
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Old 01-03-2013, 16:12
goggled
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Some say the 582N is good, others not. Claims against are like weak wifi or problems with port forwarding. As every house is different, I take moans about signal strength with white condiment.
See the varied opinions on the PN community forum.

Personally I have no problems with it with sync 8000+ with 47 dB att and 3dB margin ( ADSL2+)
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Old 01-03-2013, 16:39
Happy_Chappy
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Thanks for the replies. I guess I'll give it a go then. A speedier connection would be good, but I do use wifi on the opposite side of house so if the signal is weaker this may be a problem - will see how it goes. I assume switching back is possible/not difficult?

The "N" being better than "G" bit I understand, but I'm afraid "sync 8000+ with 47 dB att and 3dB margin ( ADSL2+)" is beyond me! Sorry
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:30
phil solo
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These are connection stats, which should be available on the Status page of your router. I don't know the TG585v7 model but if you log in to your router's home page by browsing to http://192.168.1.254 there should be a panel, link or tab displaying this information.

"sync 8000+" means the Line Rate at which the router connects to the exchange is above 8Mbps (not the data transfer rate, which can be considerably slower if there is congestion or line problems)

"47 dB att" is the Line Attenuation value. which indicates the signall loss or deterioration over the length of the line. A high value suggests a longer distance between you and the exchange (or possibly a faulty or poor quality line)

"3dB margin" is the value for Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) which is the ration of signal power to background noise on the line. The higher the value the better, as the stronger the signal power the more robust the connection. A long line, or a damaged line will, along with a high Attenuation value, have a correspondingly low SNR value (margin), and the router firmware and software will have to "work harder" to maintain a speedy and stable connection.

What goggled is saying is that even with a relatively high Attenuation Rate and low Margin, he/she regularly gets a broadband connection rate above 8Mbps with little trouble from their TG582n router.

My understanding is that, aside from the higher Wi-Fi speeds, the 802.11n standard offers better range and improved signal strength but it all rather depends somewhat on the efficiency of the router antenna, firmware, and the type of construction materials used in your house, so whilst in theory the TG582n should provide a better wi-fi signal to the far side of your home, this is not guaranteed to be the case for your own circumstances.

Trivia Note: Thomson was renamed Technicolor in 2010
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Old 02-03-2013, 21:23
Happy_Chappy
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These are connection stats, which should be available on the Status page of your router. I don't know the TG585v7 model but if you log in to your router's home page by browsing to http://192.168.1.254 there should be a panel, link or tab displaying this information.

"sync 8000+" means the Line Rate at which the router connects to the exchange is above 8Mbps (not the data transfer rate, which can be considerably slower if there is congestion or line problems)

"47 dB att" is the Line Attenuation value. which indicates the signall loss or deterioration over the length of the line. A high value suggests a longer distance between you and the exchange (or possibly a faulty or poor quality line)

"3dB margin" is the value for Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) which is the ration of signal power to background noise on the line. The higher the value the better, as the stronger the signal power the more robust the connection. A long line, or a damaged line will, along with a high Attenuation value, have a correspondingly low SNR value (margin), and the router firmware and software will have to "work harder" to maintain a speedy and stable connection.

What goggled is saying is that even with a relatively high Attenuation Rate and low Margin, he/she regularly gets a broadband connection rate above 8Mbps with little trouble from their TG582n router.

My understanding is that, aside from the higher Wi-Fi speeds, the 802.11n standard offers better range and improved signal strength but it all rather depends somewhat on the efficiency of the router antenna, firmware, and the type of construction materials used in your house, so whilst in theory the TG582n should provide a better wi-fi signal to the far side of your home, this is not guaranteed to be the case for your own circumstances.

Trivia Note: Thomson was renamed Technicolor in 2010
Thanks for taking the time to explain that for me.

My current router says:

Bandwidth (Up/Down) [kbps/kbps]: 443 / 7,783
Line Attenuation (Up/Down) [dB]: 21.5 / 40.0
SN Margin (Up/Down) [dB]: 21.5 / 3.5

So I guess that means I have a 40 dB att and 3.5dB margin?

Is the bandwidth different to the line rate? or is my line rate 7.8Mbps? I think I get actual transfer speed (?) of about 6.5Mbps

Sorry if I'm being tedious! Am interested to learn these things
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