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The HARRY POTTER Books


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Old 16-04-2013, 20:44
Addisonian
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Well each to their own,as they say.I read them
all aloud to grandchildren and found them to be
tedious,badly written,badly plotted and with one
dimensional characters.
But they sold squillions,so what do I know?
Oh come on! Wasn't there anything you enjoyed about them?
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Old 16-04-2013, 21:27
lordOfTime
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One-dimensional?
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Old 16-04-2013, 21:32
Phoenix Lazarus
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Well each to their own,as they say.I read them
all aloud to grandchildren and found them to be
tedious,badly written,badly plotted and with one
dimensional characters
.
What about Snape, Dumbledore-and even Peter Pettigrew/Wormtail?
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Old 24-04-2013, 19:38
lordOfTime
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Ginny Weasley who was affected by being possessed by Tom Riddle's Diary, and Neville Longbottom who was so very nearly the the kind of hero Harry was and of course who's parents were tortured to insanity by Voldemort.
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Old 21-08-2013, 13:46
Beady Eye 2013
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Think I may read these again before the year is out. Amazing books and I think it is odd when people analyse every last sentence she wrote, just sit back, read and ignore.
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Old 22-08-2013, 00:11
loracan
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I read the first four to both my children (at different times) they are an absolute dream for reading aloud.
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Old 22-08-2013, 05:59
David Waine
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Well each to their own,as they say.I read them
all aloud to grandchildren and found them to be
tedious,badly written,badly plotted and with one
dimensional characters.
But they sold squillions,so what do I know?
There is a sad British tradition of knocking anyone who is successful. It is something that our cousins across the Atlantic do not suffer from. They celebrate success, but it rather embarrasses us. I distinctly remember how ashamed of being British I felt during our run of gold medals in last year's Olympics. Well actually, no I don't. I am as proud of our athletes as anyone. I am equally proud to be part of the nation that spawned J.K. Rowling who, virtually single-handedly, got an entire generation of youngsters reading again.

I have read them all several times each, so I know them pretty well. Tedious? No, they are not. There is far too much action in all of them, coupled with moments of genuine pathos, for them to be tedious.

Badly written? They vary, but their strengths outweigh their weakness by miles. 'Order of the Phoenix' is the weakest book in my opinion, being about half as long again as it has any real need to be. I think she was a victim of her own success in that she had to keep a huge and impatient audience supplied with new Harry Potter books as quickly as possible. This led to the later books (which are also the longest, of course) being written as fast as she physically could. Working under that sort of pressure, it is some achievement that they are as good as they are - and at their best, they are very good indeed. Overall, there isn't anything wrong with any of them that a good re-edit couldn't put right, but I don't suppose that will ever happen. Why should she?

Badly plotted? Can you justify that? Rowling is unusual in that she allows her characters to age between books. Alexandre Dumas did a similar thing with his 'Three Musketeers' novels, but not on this sort of scale. The first two books are very much for children. 'Prisoner of Azkaban' forms a sort of crossing point. After that, they get progressively darker and gloomier, culminating in 'Deathly Hallows', which is well on the way to becoming a horror story' (in the classic sense, that is, which sees Voldemort as a sort of modern day Dracula figure). All this without losing sight of the series' core concepts. Bad plotting? I don't think so.

One-dimensional characters? Really? A hero with a genuine dark side. Harry isn't above using an unforgivable curse on occasion - and he has a very short fuse, a legacy of the horrors of his infancy. There again, he is capable of intense love and self-sacrifice. What is one-dimensional about that? How about Hermione's and Ron's love - hate relationship? What about Snape? The last book is almost into its final pages before we discover whose side he is really on.

All in all, I think you answered your own question.
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Old 22-08-2013, 10:12
KatieLuLu2
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Think I may read these again before the year is out. Amazing books and I think it is odd when people analyse every last sentence she wrote, just sit back, read and ignore.
I agree with you that people over analyze every sentence. As far as I'm concerned the characters are not one dimensional, I could see the different facets of their personalities and the characters were "human" and not some perfect, god-like creature
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Old 22-08-2013, 11:34
Beady Eye 2013
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I read the first four to both my children (at different times) they are an absolute dream for reading aloud.
I am sure they would have preferred Stephan Fry

I agree with you that people over analyze every sentence. As far as I'm concerned the characters are not one dimensional, I could see the different facets of their personalities and the characters were "human" and not some perfect, god-like creature
I think we are correct!

There is a sad British tradition of knocking anyone who is successful. It is something that our cousins across the Atlantic do not suffer from. They celebrate success, but it rather embarrasses us. I distinctly remember how ashamed of being British I felt during our run of gold medals in last year's Olympics. Well actually, no I don't. I am as proud of our athletes as anyone. I am equally proud to be part of the nation that spawned J.K. Rowling who, virtually single-handedly, got an entire generation of youngsters reading again.

I have read them all several times each, so I know them pretty well. Tedious? No, they are not. There is far too much action in all of them, coupled with moments of genuine pathos, for them to be tedious.

Badly written? They vary, but their strengths outweigh their weakness by miles. 'Order of the Phoenix' is the weakest book in my opinion, being about half as long again as it has any real need to be. I think she was a victim of her own success in that she had to keep a huge and impatient audience supplied with new Harry Potter books as quickly as possible. This led to the later books (which are also the longest, of course) being written as fast as she physically could. Working under that sort of pressure, it is some achievement that they are as good as they are - and at their best, they are very good indeed. Overall, there isn't anything wrong with any of them that a good re-edit couldn't put right, but I don't suppose that will ever happen. Why should she?

Badly plotted? Can you justify that? Rowling is unusual in that she allows her characters to age between books. Alexandre Dumas did a similar thing with his 'Three Musketeers' novels, but not on this sort of scale. The first two books are very much for children. 'Prisoner of Azkaban' forms a sort of crossing point. After that, they get progressively darker and gloomier, culminating in 'Deathly Hallows', which is well on the way to becoming a horror story' (in the classic sense, that is, which sees Voldemort as a sort of modern day Dracula figure). All this without losing sight of the series' core concepts. Bad plotting? I don't think so.

One-dimensional characters? Really? A hero with a genuine dark side. Harry isn't above using an unforgivable curse on occasion - and he has a very short fuse, a legacy of the horrors of his infancy. There again, he is capable of intense love and self-sacrifice. What is one-dimensional about that? How about Hermione's and Ron's love - hate relationship? What about Snape? The last book is almost into its final pages before we discover whose side he is really on.

All in all, I think you answered your own question.
A well thought out and beautifully written response. Loved reading this post
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