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Old 04-04-2013, 19:22
beefymonster
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The ones I really liked but are not about any more was the tripods trilogy by John Christopher.(I think)
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Old 04-04-2013, 19:48
spookyLX
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The ones I really liked but are not about any more was the tripods trilogy by John Christopher.(I think)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Tripods-...ds=the+tripods
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Old 05-04-2013, 00:31
beefymonster
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Thanks. it says on the cover there was a tv show on it by bbc but i don't remember it. Was probably crap the cover looks very very dated, I may buy these
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:18
bugloss
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Thanks. it says on the cover there was a tv show on it by bbc but i don't remember it. Was probably crap the cover looks very very dated, I may buy these
it was really good IMH Teenage O, But They Didn't Do The Third Book!
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Old 05-04-2013, 17:53
Nick_G
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So many happy reading Memories in this Thread

read most of them but there was one particular book I loved called Rebecca's world Journey to the Forbidden Planet by Terry Nation .

I remember it being read to us at school, and I fell in love with it . Have always wanted a copy but discovered it was out of print so I kept an eye on ebay for an affordable copy ( they had copies for scary prices ) and I eventually got a copy I have not read it yet as I don't want to take it out of the protective bag it came in and risk it getting damaged
^Same with me (see my previous post).

I suspect that it has the Terry Nation/Doctor Who connection that makes it command silly prices. Of course I wasn't aware of this connection at the time!
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Old 05-04-2013, 20:01
spookyLX
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Thanks. it says on the cover there was a tv show on it by bbc but i don't remember it. Was probably crap the cover looks very very dated, I may buy these
Tv show was quite good for it's time well worth watching
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Old 05-04-2013, 20:10
izanami
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I remember having a book of nonsense poetry when I was little.

I have no idea what it was called but I had it forever and it was falling apart due to the amount I read it. I read all my books a lot but this particular one I read a LOT.
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Old 06-04-2013, 01:44
beefymonster
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it was really good IMH Teenage O, But They Didn't Do The Third Book!
They really should make a film of these books as with CGI advances and the brilliant concept of the book it would be really good
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Old 12-04-2013, 22:58
chloeb
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I remember reading Mandy. As you say, it was written by Julie Andrews, but she used her married name of Julie Edwards for it.
Yes, I didnt realise it was her until I was a 'grown up' : )

I had/have a very vivid imagination & it appealed to my nature, the thought of a secret place where I could go & be alone
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Old 12-04-2013, 23:20
Kat1966
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Like many others some of my favourite childhood books were Enid Blyton's Mallory Towers and the St Clare series, I also loved the Chalet School books and will be having a look at that website ~ thanks for the info on that

I loved Ballet Shoes, but I also seem to remember a series of books by Noel Streatfeild called Gemma and Sisters, it was about a girl who was (I think either a child actress or model), it's been at least 35 years since I read them so I'm a bit vague on some details, she goes to live with relatives and they start singing in a unusual style (described as "swirling"), they become popular and the books are about their adventures. I think there were 3 or 4 in the series. I was brought the first one on holiday in Wales and read it until it fell to pieces.

Also loved the Cherry Ames series and did think of being a nurse until it was pointed out to me that I didn't like the sight of blood(!), the Nancy Drew series of stories, Mrs Pepperpot, Milly Molly Mandy, Pippi Longstocking as well as the usual children's classics. Blimey, in those days I nearly always had my nose in a book if I was at home.
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Old 12-04-2013, 23:24
Kat1966
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I've just looked on Amazon and unbelievably they have copies of the Gemma and Sisters novels available!! I'm sooooo tempted to buy them
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Old 13-04-2013, 00:18
Fibromite59
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Like many others some of my favourite childhood books were Enid Blyton's Mallory Towers and the St Clare series, I also loved the Chalet School books and will be having a look at that website ~ thanks for the info on that

I loved Ballet Shoes, but I also seem to remember a series of books by Noel Streatfeild called Gemma and Sisters, it was about a girl who was (I think either a child actress or model), it's been at least 35 years since I read them so I'm a bit vague on some details, she goes to live with relatives and they start singing in a unusual style (described as "swirling"), they become popular and the books are about their adventures. I think there were 3 or 4 in the series. I was brought the first one on holiday in Wales and read it until it fell to pieces.

Also loved the Cherry Ames series and did think of being a nurse until it was pointed out to me that I didn't like the sight of blood(!), the Nancy Drew series of stories, Mrs Pepperpot, Milly Molly Mandy, Pippi Longstocking as well as the usual children's classics. Blimey, in those days I nearly always had my nose in a book if I was at home.
Yes, I also used to read the Gemma series by Noel Streatfeild (I loved all her books). Gemma Bow was a child actress and went to stay with her cousins who were talented too. There were four books, Gemma, Gemma and Sisters, Gemma Alone and Goodbye Gemma. At some point some of the titles were changed to things like Gemma In Love and Gemma The Star. Like you, I also had my nose in a book as a child.

I hope you enjoy the FOCS website. If you join it, you will get so much enjoyment from it.
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Old 14-04-2013, 17:30
Shomofo
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Just finished reading the Sadlers's Wells books again after this thread. Also found out there are 2 at the end that I've never read. I have this on order now.
After that I think it will be Chalet School time!
I do so love old kids book as they are just so sweet and innocent and definitely a snapshot of time gone past.
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Old 14-04-2013, 18:05
Fibromite59
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Just finished reading the Sadlers's Wells books again after this thread. Also found out there are 2 at the end that I've never read. I have this on order now.
After that I think it will be Chalet School time!
I do so love old kids book as they are just so sweet and innocent and definitely a snapshot of time gone past.
You would be amazed at the adults who still love reading childrens books. There are all sorts of societies out there for various children's authors. Do have a look at both Friends Of The Chalet School and Also Girls Gone By Publishers where you can get modern reprints in lovely editions of these old books.

I think it is comfort reading to read of times when things were more innocent and children were actually allowed to be children for a longer time.
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Old 19-04-2013, 22:46
Loula-Belle
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My favourite book as a child was called "The little girl who lived down the road" by Niki Daly. It was a peculiar book with beautiful illustrations. My mum hated it it because I insisted she read it to me all the time.
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Old 20-04-2013, 08:20
cunningham1471
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I've just looked on Amazon and unbelievably they have copies of the Gemma and Sisters novels available!! I'm sooooo tempted to buy them
You should.

Hopefully a few people that have contributed to this thread and thank you to everyone who has, will try and revisit these forgotten books even if they are grown up now.

Just a thought for you and other people. Often local libraries have old books in storage. i was going through the Greenwich council library online service. I was doing a search and found old books based on a theme I didn't know existed.
I reserved them, had to pay a fee of about a quid per book for some poor sod to go hunting the books out in the storage rooms. I got an autobiography printed in 1984 that hadn't been loaned out since 1988.
Had I not done that search it would have stayed stuck in a box or on a shelf forgotten. So it may be worth asking in your local library if they have a copy of a lost/forgotten book in their storage/vaults.
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Old 20-04-2013, 08:32
cunningham1471
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You would be amazed at the adults who still love reading childrens books. There are all sorts of societies out there for various children's authors. Do have a look at both Friends Of The Chalet School and Also Girls Gone By Publishers where you can get modern reprints in lovely editions of these old books.

I think it is comfort reading to read of times when things were more innocent and children were actually allowed to be children for a longer time.
I agree. i think that there is also an appeal in the way they are written too which at times can be basic or let's say uncomplicated. Some modern children's books can be too heavy in depth, over descriptive etc as well as containing themes that whilst they may be relevent to a child that age, isn't really needed in a story.
Too much reality and real life issues have been brought into some modern children's books that isn't necessary.
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Old 24-04-2013, 23:49
Grumpy pants
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I loved all the Enid Blyton books. The flower fairies collection were a faviourite too.
can anyone remember a book about a boy who was flat and he could slide under the door? I remember reading it at school but can't remember what it was called or who wrote it.
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Old 25-04-2013, 20:15
cunningham1471
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I loved all the Enid Blyton books. The flower fairies collection were a faviourite too.
can anyone remember a book about a boy who was flat and he could slide under the door? I remember reading it at school but can't remember what it was called or who wrote it.
I had a Google and I come up with this.

Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown (1964)

http://www.flatstanley.com/

*warning*
There is an annoying add for an app that you can't shift unless you click on it and then close the window that opens and then go back to that page.

Apparently it was a series of books and in this article from 2011, there were plans to turn it into a film, but I'm guessing that it won't happen if it hasn't yet.

http://veryaware.com/2011/08/flat-st...he-big-screen/
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Old 09-05-2013, 21:17
Fibromite59
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I have a book I was given as a Sunday school prize in the 1950s. It was called Patch & was about a dog. It was printed by BLackie & had really big print. It was the first book I learnt to read on my own age 4 & I have never stopped reading books since. I can still say the first few sentences of by heart all these years later.
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Old 10-05-2013, 00:01
Chatty Jeff
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I had a Google and I come up with this.

Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown (1964)

http://www.flatstanley.com/

*warning*
There is an annoying add for an app that you can't shift unless you click on it and then close the window that opens and then go back to that page.

Apparently it was a series of books and in this article from 2011, there were plans to turn it into a film, but I'm guessing that it won't happen if it hasn't yet.

http://veryaware.com/2011/08/flat-st...he-big-screen/
i bloody loved flat stanley as a kid, when my son was old enough to read i told his mum about it and that id love to read it to him. shed never heard of it and even thought i was making it up but, in true JR Hartley style, managed to track down a copy for me (in truth i think she just ordered it from waterstones, but was still an awesome thing to do)
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:43
cunningham1471
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You would be amazed at the adults who still love reading childrens books. There are all sorts of societies out there for various children's authors. Do have a look at both Friends Of The Chalet School and Also Girls Gone By Publishers where you can get modern reprints in lovely editions of these old books.

I think it is comfort reading to read of times when things were more innocent and children were actually allowed to be children for a longer time.
I find I'm reading children or young adult books's more than adult literature these days.
The older books have an innocence and can also be more un to read because of the escapism and the newer books have improved to a very high standard of writing and storytelling.
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Old 12-05-2013, 11:52
coolmum123
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I learned to read with 'the village with three corners' series with roger red hat, billy blue hat, jennifer yellow hat. (amazingly when my son started school about 10 years ago they had those hooks as part of their reading scheme!!!!)

Swallows and amazons Arthur ransome
Private keep out by gwen grant hilarious book
Malory towers
St Clare's
Them there were these other hooks where you could make decisions at the end of chapters so that you were in control of the story and the same book could have loads of different endings depending on the decisions you made. Can't remember what they were called but they were awesome!

Last edited by coolmum123 : 12-05-2013 at 11:53. Reason: Spelling hooks should be books!!!
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Old 12-05-2013, 12:42
Sue_C
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I was an avid reader as a child and devoured everything I could lay my hands on including Enid Blyton, My Naughty Little Sister, Chalet School, etc.

Three books stick in my memory from when I first learnt to read. My first book from the school library was Moldy Warp the Mole by Alison Uttley. It was brand new, had a beautiful dark grey cover and lovely illustrations. I could read it all by myself and felt so grown up.

At home we had some very old books in quite good condition. There were a couple that I particularly liked, both originally printed in the 1870s I think. Little Queenie by Emma Marshall has an inscription dated 1900 and Carrots Just A Little Boy by Mrs Molesworth has a print date of 1908. Both books have been ruined by my writing in them and colouring in the illustrations.

Later on I discovered an algebra book from around the same date and I used to spend happy Sunday afternoons trying to solve the problems. I was a strange child!
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Old 12-05-2013, 21:25
cunningham1471
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I learned to read with 'the village with three corners' series with roger red hat, billy blue hat, jennifer yellow hat. (amazingly when my son started school about 10 years ago they had those hooks as part of their reading scheme!!!!)

Swallows and amazons Arthur ransome
Private keep out by gwen grant hilarious book
Malory towers
St Clare's
Them there were these other hooks where you could make decisions at the end of chapters so that you were in control of the story and the same book could have loads of different endings depending on the decisions you made. Can't remember what they were called but they were awesome!
They were called "Fighting Fantasy" books The names of authors I seem to remember were Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone.

They still make those kind of books under the title "Choose your own adventure." They are about 4-7 a time but they do also do them as box sets of books for about 12-18
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