Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 
 

How much money would you give for a wedding present?


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 22-04-2013, 06:01
Fairyprincess0
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,902
What's wrong with just getting them a fondue set, apart from that no one wants a fondue set....
Fairyprincess0 is online now   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 22-04-2013, 10:20
Jambo_c
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,523
I'd give different people different amounts, but I'd only give what I could afford.
I'd always rather give people money and we asked for money when we got married. Wedding gifts were traditionally for people to set up home but most people are already living together and have household items. Money is appreciated a lot more. You're always going to get people who object but I don't see why. When we got married one person didn't give us money (she's known for being awkward), she bought us a few bits and bobs including a picture frame. She probably spent about 20 but everything she bought was horrible, it was exactly to her tastes but not ours. I don't even know where any of it is now, it's probably under the bed in the spare room. Surely that's a complete waste? I'd have appreciated a single pound coin more than that.
Jambo_c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 10:35
SnrDev
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 2,339
The amount doesn't matter, what matters is how much you can afford to give. In this case the 300 is money that this pair can't reasonably afford so it's verging on ridiculous to give away an amount that's such a large part of the household budget.

I'd have thought 100 is a good amount in your position. It's enough not be seen as a bit cheapskate but not enough to seriously dent your own finances.
SnrDev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 10:37
Glasgow Girl
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In the depths of beyond
Posts: 446
When my brother got married I gave him 100 as basically I didn't know what to buy him for a wedding present as he had his wife had been living together for some time. I had said that, if he wanted, I would give him money and he said that was very generous of me as he knew that we didn't have a lot of money going spare. He used it on his honeymoon and told me afterwards that he had bought a couple of things which he and his wife had wanted but wouldn't have been able to afford otherwise. He still has them and he says that it reminds him both of me and of his honeymoon.
Glasgow Girl is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 10:41
wench
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 6,142
It should simply be what your partner can afford, if she thinks she can afford 300 then let her be generous.

Also just wanted to point out, I personally think a wedding (hopefully once in a lifetime event) is far more important than a 5 yr olds birthday, after all birthdays come every year.
wench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 11:05
striing
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 7,000
What's wrong with just getting them a fondue set, apart from that no one wants a fondue set....
I once wanted a fondue set, having used one at a friend's house. It was 1985.

In response to the question, I would never give money as a wedding present. I'd give a present. Something untraceable from a local shop so no one would ever know the monetary value. And I'd choose what to buy based on it being something nice and how much money I had at the time. (We've got a vast array of fantastic shops round here before anyone thinks I mean the local newsagents.)
striing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 11:29
Xela M
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,860
It should simply be what your partner can afford, if she thinks she can afford 300 then let her be generous.

Also just wanted to point out, I personally think a wedding (hopefully once in a lifetime event) is far more important than a 5 yr olds birthday, after all birthdays come every year.
You must not have kids. How can your own child's birthday be less important than some relative's wedding
Xela M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 11:42
elliecat
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6,259
We are getting married next year, we are getting money of my parents, his Mum and probably my two brother's and sister. They have all said that as we already live together and don't need anything for the house, money would be more useful that way we can put it towards what we want (in our case a deposit for a bigger house).

As for how much, you give what you can afford and if your other half wishes to give her brother 300 that's up to her she has obviously thought about and decided that is what she can realistically afford/save.
elliecat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 12:00
wench
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 6,142
You must not have kids. How can your own child's birthday be less important than some relative's wedding
You are correct, I have no children.

But I still think a once in a lifetime event is more important than a birthday that occurs every year.

If its about money and whether you spend money for a child's present or a sibling's wedding then I say get a cheap pressie for the child and spend more on the wedding.
wench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 14:21
eluf38
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,277
Give what you can afford. At our wedding we had a cheque for 200 from someone who wasn't even able to attend the wedding - but he earns 100,000+ annually, so it was small change to him. My parents' middle class friends and senior members of the family gave about 50, but most of our twenty-something friends and siblings gave 20 - 40, and that includes siblings and first cousins. Younger people, especially those with families, do have different priorities to older people who have no children at home or have paid off their mortgage, and you shouldn't feel pressured to give more to 'keep up appearances'.
I would have hated to think that people had put themselves into debt for our sakes. If your partner wants to help with the wedding, couldn't she offer her time / services in some way? I was really grateful to a friend who helped by altering the bridemaid's dresses, and was really touched when my sister in law's partner offered to sew a tear in our ring-bearing cushion. (He's in the army and did a much neater job than I could!)
Likewise, when my sister got married we didn't give them a huge present - but I bought her a bridal handbag to carry her tissues, and likewise she found one in a charity shop which matched my dress exactly for my wedding.
Instead of a lump sum, perhaps her help and support could be more valuable?
eluf38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 14:34
mellybumps
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 352
I would give about 50, especially if you have upcoming costs (MOT and daughter's birthday). My cousin and her fiance asked for cash last year - which TBH I think is pretty rude anyway - and I gave them 30. My other half said I was being tight but we don't have much money at all, we struggle most months, and once we'd bought outfits etc the whole day cost us quite a bit. To me 300 is completely excessive apart from maybe as a gift from the bride or groom's parents or someone who has money to burn!
mellybumps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 15:02
Xela M
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,860
If it were my brother getting married I'd probably give in the region of 300, but I wouldn't get into debt just for a wedding.
Xela M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2013, 15:14
tellywatcher73
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,920
When my nephew got married I gave a gift of 100 which seemed reasonable with all the other costs involved with going to the wedding.
tellywatcher73 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 22:41.