Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 

Do you need a passport to fly within the UK?


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 20-05-2013, 16:16
marieukxx
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Cornwall
Posts: 2,152

My dad is off to Scotland soon and realised his passport has just gone out of date. He's flying with Easyjet. Does he need to get it renewed to fly?
marieukxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 20-05-2013, 16:20
cutekitty7686
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: wales
Posts: 845
http://easyjet.custhelp.com/app/answ...20I%20passport

should have answer
cutekitty7686 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 16:21
RandomSally
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,499
He will likely need some form of photo id. Best to check the Easyjet site or call them I think.
RandomSally is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 16:22
marieukxx
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Cornwall
Posts: 2,152
Thanks
marieukxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 16:33
VOICEINTHENIGHT
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,003
My dad is off to Scotland soon and realised his passport has just gone out of date. He's flying with Easyjet. Does he need to get it renewed to fly?
Can one Fly within, a few months ago I tried to find a way of flying from the north west to Devon. My Mother was very ill and I wanted to make a 'flying visit' but there was no way of flying from Blackpool or Manchester to Exeter Everyone I tried said the same thing 'No sorry we don't fly that route' My mum is dead now so I don't need to fly within Britain but I would be interested to know why it is so difficult to travel by flight within the UK. I nearly flew via Dublin at one stage, then we decided to go by train (It cost me a flipping fortune)
VOICEINTHENIGHT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 16:38
jsmith99
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 14,030
It depends what they mean by a "valid" passport. I notice that, further down the page, they refer to "valid, in date" passports. I've never understood why out of date passports shouldn't be accepted for non-government ID purposes, but I suppose then there'd be arguments about when you draw the line.

It also says that photographic driving licences are sufficient for UK domestic flights.
jsmith99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 16:54
Chizzleface
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 7,650
Yeah, it's usually Government-issued photo ID, or whatever the airline approves for internal flights. I used to fly to Scotland all the time with my driving license, saved me having to take my passport.
Chizzleface is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 16:54
Ambassador
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wooler, Northumberlandiana
Posts: 21,659
Can one Fly within, a few months ago I tried to find a way of flying from the north west to Devon. My Mother was very ill and I wanted to make a 'flying visit' but there was no way of flying from Blackpool or Manchester to Exeter Everyone I tried said the same thing 'No sorry we don't fly that route' My mum is dead now so I don't need to fly within Britain but I would be interested to know why it is so difficult to travel by flight within the UK. I nearly flew via Dublin at one stage, then we decided to go by train (It cost me a flipping fortune)
Small island, high airport handling charges, high taxes...would make most routes without a feeder connection (Newcastle-London) or industry based there a waste of time

But on your point, doesn't help now but FlyBe do x3 Exeter-Manchester
Ambassador is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 16:55
Chizzleface
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 7,650
It depends what they mean by a "valid" passport. I notice that, further down the page, they refer to "valid, in date" passports. I've never understood why out of date passports shouldn't be accepted for non-government ID purposes, but I suppose then there'd be arguments about when you draw the line.

It also says that photographic driving licences are sufficient for UK domestic flights.
Some airlines do accept a recently-out of date passport as ID for internal flights, but there's a time limit if I remember rightly.
Chizzleface is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 17:03
ianx
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bordertown
Posts: 7,376
It depends what they mean by a "valid" passport. I notice that, further down the page, they refer to "valid, in date" passports. I've never understood why out of date passports shouldn't be accepted for non-government ID purposes, but I suppose then there'd be arguments about when you draw the line.
I've flown on an internal UK flight with Easyjet using an expired UK passport as ID. I had no problem, but I was told when I checked beforehand that it was at the discretion of the person on the check-in desk and they couldn't guarantee it would be accepted.
ianx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 19:25
1fab
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 10,821
It's strange. Why doesn't this apply to train journeys as well?
1fab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 20:33
smudges dad
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Fort William and Aberdeen
Posts: 16,297
It's strange. Why doesn't this apply to train journeys as well?
Passport checks at every station - think remote Scottish stations or busy London commuter stations.
smudges dad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 20:56
1fab
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 10,821
Passport checks at every station - think remote Scottish stations or busy London commuter stations.
I know. I just wonder why it's considered necessary for domestic flights, when it isn't for trains.
1fab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 21:57
Jaydogg_Home
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 156
Photo ID, I.E Driving License, anything with your photo and PASS on it.
Jaydogg_Home is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 22:32
bart4858
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5,755
I know. I just wonder why it's considered necessary for domestic flights, when it isn't for trains.
Air travel needs extra security, with proper passenger manifests for each trip.
bart4858 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 22:52
tothegrand
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 4,143
Think you should need a passport, surely the lesson has been learnt about lax security on domestic flights.
tothegrand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 23:01
mackara
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Norn Iron
Posts: 3,851
depends on the airline, Ryanair never ask me for a passport but Easyjet insist on one.
mackara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2013, 23:37
ff999
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Middlesex
Posts: 4,452
I just flew to Aberdeen and back this weekend on BA and wasn't asked for any id.
I know of people who have been refused on both Ryanair and easyJet for lack of a passport on domestic flights. Was a couple of years ago though.
ff999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2013, 07:17
grumpyscot
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 6,781
Passport checks at every station - think remote Scottish stations or busy London commuter stations.
Two remote stations in Scotland - Carrour, where the nearest road is 8 miles from the station. And Arisaig, the most westerly station in the UK. Neither have on-site staff, as do none of the non-main stations in Scotland. I don't think E&W are any different - certainly Wales isn't.

Now, if Scotland gets independence (I shudder at the thought) then you'll need passports to go to and from Scotland, as it won't get membership of the EU so won't be able to invoke the Schengen agreement.
grumpyscot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2013, 07:39
smudges dad
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Fort William and Aberdeen
Posts: 16,297
Two remote stations in Scotland - Carrour, where the nearest road is 8 miles from the station. And Arisaig, the most westerly station in the UK. Neither have on-site staff, as do none of the non-main stations in Scotland. I don't think E&W are any different - certainly Wales isn't.

Now, if Scotland gets independence (I shudder at the thought) then you'll need passports to go to and from Scotland, as it won't get membership of the EU so won't be able to invoke the Schengen agreement.
I was thinking of Locheilside where you have to put your hand out to stop the train. It used to have a jetty so people could row across the loch and catch the train. It's only a couple of hundred metres from where I live.
smudges dad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2013, 07:52
michaelalanr
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hawarden, Flintshire
Posts: 757
depends on the airline, Ryanair never ask me for a passport but Easyjet insist on one.
Its the other way around. I fly to Northern Ireland from Liverpool all the time with Easy Jet and Fly on my Driving License. When i fly with Ryan Air i have to use my passport.

http://www.ryanair.com/en/terms-and-...ldocumentation

THE ONLY FORMS OF TRAVEL DOCUMENTS ACCEPTED ON RYANAIR FLIGHTS ARE:

A valid passport
A valid National Identity Card issued by the government of a European Economic Area (EEA) country. (Only the following EEA countries currentlyissue National Identity Cards acceptable for carriage on Ryanair flights: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden (not accepted on non Schengen flights), Switzerland)
A valid German Government issued ‘Kinderausweis’ travel document
A valid Greek National Police identity card
A valid Spanish Family Book (for use by children under 14 years travelling with their parents/legal guardians on Spanish domestic flights only)
A valid Italian ‘Certificato Di Nascita’ with photo (for use by children under 16 years) which has been endorsed as ‘VALIDO PER L'ESPATRIO’ for travel on international flights, no endorsement is required when travelling on Italian domestic flights.. It is the passenger's personal responsibility to ensure that this document meets the requirements of immigration and other governmental authorities at the destination airport.
A valid Italian AT/BT card (for Italian domestic flights only).
A valid UN Refugee Convention Travel Document – (issued in accordance with Article 28(1) of the 1951 UN Convention, by a Government in place of a valid passport.)
A valid Convention Travel Document – (issued in accordance with Article 27 of the 1954 UN Convention for Stateless Persons, by a contracting state in place of a valid passport)
A valid Collective Passport issued by an EU/EEA country
http://corporate.easyjet.com/media/l...-01-04-en.aspx

easyJet now accepts pension books as a valid form of ID on domestic flights.
This means that the below forms of photographic ID are accepted at check-in:
UK domestic flights:
A valid passport - an expired passport can be used up to a maximum of two years after expiry Valid photographic EU or Swiss national identity card Valid photographic driving licence Valid armed forces identity card Valid police warrant card/badge Valid airport employees security identity pass A child on parent' s passport is an acceptable form of ID CitizenCard Valid photographic firearm certificate Valid Government-issued identity card SMART card Electoral identity card Pension Book
Passengers must present one of the above forms of valid photographic identification on all UK domestic flights. No other forms of photographic identification are accepted. If you do not have one of the above means of identification, easyJet cannot accept you for travel.
Mike
michaelalanr is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2013, 08:56
davidmcn
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 8,550
I've never understood why out of date passports shouldn't be accepted for non-government ID purposes
Probably the greater risk of them falling into the hands of someone else, and/or being tampered with (in a way which might fool check-in staff but not immigration officers).

I know. I just wonder why it's considered necessary for domestic flights, when it isn't for trains.
Air travel needs extra security, with proper passenger manifests for each trip.
Nothing to do with security, all about revenue control I.e. preventing people from reselling cheap tickets. Some domestic ferries need photo ID too. And I've had to produce credit card with advance rail tickets - same idea.

Think you should need a passport, surely the lesson has been learnt about lax security on domestic flights.
Think the lessons are mostly about allowing knives and bombs get on board.
davidmcn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2013, 11:03
cat666
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,919
I flew from Luton-Inverness last year with just a photo card driving license on EasyJet. Had no issues getting to Scotland, but on the way back I was subject to a more stringent than usual check before boarding. No real reason behind it so I assume it was just a random check.
cat666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2013, 11:23
bart4858
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5,755
Nothing to do with security, all about revenue control I.e. preventing people from reselling cheap tickets. Some domestic ferries need photo ID too. And I've had to produce credit card with advance rail tickets - same idea.
You can buy advance tickets at a station and pay cash. Anyway I don't remember a requirement to have to carry the payment card with you when travelling.

And it's still not photo-id. With aircraft it's necessary to know the exact identity of everyone who's flying. But anyone can get on a train even without a ticket!
bart4858 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2013, 12:07
davidmcn
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 8,550
You can buy advance tickets at a station and pay cash. Anyway I don't remember a requirement to have to carry the payment card with you when travelling.
Depends on the TOC and type of ticket, I think this was a Cross Country e-ticket.

And it's still not photo-id. With aircraft it's necessary to know the exact identity of everyone who's flying.
Only to the extent of a list of passenger names - as pointed out, the likes of BA don't check that the person with the boarding card is the one named on it.
davidmcn is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:42.