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Old 23-07-2013, 20:26
Azura's Star
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I have asked this before.. why does having a baby mean the end of her career? Are young doctors not supposed to have babies?
Personally, her age is not the problem.

Shallow as it may be, I would just find it incredibly difficult to take her completely seriously as a medical professional when I knew that she was Mrs PA, and I had seen the two of them in "Hiya" magazine showing us around their glamorous home.

But that's just me - there is absolutely no reason whatsoever why a baby would mean the end of her or any woman's career.
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Old 23-07-2013, 20:29
Azura's Star
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[quote=Essex Angel*;67328091]
I know, and I do feel a bit guilty but I can't help it.

My daughter is a few years younger than Emily, but she sure as hell knows her own mind already.
I just know that if I had watched my daughter work her butt off to pass her exams, and was on the way to qualifying as a doctor, I would be so disappointed FOR HER if she suddenly announced that she was pregnant by a 40 year old reality tv "star" and family friend that she wasn't even living with.[/QUOTE]

I'd have to live with someone for a while to make sure his habits wouldn't irritate me.
Yup.
And don't forget it's not just him she'll be living with.
It'll be him, his kids, the nannies, Gloria etc etc.

I know they have probably spent alot of time together and been on holiday a few times, but it's going to be a whole lot different when it's all day, every day.
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Old 23-07-2013, 20:38
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Yup.
And don't forget it's not just him she'll be living with.
It'll be him, his kids, the nannies, Gloria etc etc.
And PA's brothers, CANs, and some cameras.
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Old 23-07-2013, 20:39
chipbuttie1
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On twitter? If they are that internet savvy she needs to think about her anal Vodka stories & fighting over other womens boyfriends.
Calm down dear you'll get indigestion, ask PA for an alka seltza.
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Old 23-07-2013, 20:43
artlesschaos
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Sorry BEL, have to disagree with you there , if she had the right support , then it could be very attainable , no reason she couldn't take the child with her.
I was an army wife and our children travelled the globe with us wherever my husband was posted , my daughter and son-in-law have taken their 2 sons with them when they worked abroad.
It can be done without being detrimental to the children
I think there is a big difference between living with children on army bases to dragging a demanding, helpless child around the world's trouble spots, which is what I assumed she meant.

As well as the baby.
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Old 23-07-2013, 20:50
barneyboy
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I have asked this before.. why does having a baby mean the end of her career? Are young doctors not supposed to have babies?
I never said it didnt, and I wish her well. I think you missunderstood me.

Ill try and put it another way...It wouldve been better to get some work experience in first. If she was with an unemployed dad or not on telly she wouldve been on the pill.
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Old 23-07-2013, 20:51
Blondie X
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I have asked this before.. why does having a baby mean the end of her career? Are young doctors not supposed to have babies?
No, it doesn't have to mean the end of her career but training to be a doctor is bloody hard work and having a baby to look after as well as work 12 hour shifts means a very difficult juggling act. Even with a nanny and family support, qualifying as a doctor whilst being a parent will be a big challenge.

In my honest opinion, it would have been so much better to wait 5 years until she was properly qualified and working within her specialist field. At the end of the day, they're adults and they make their own choices but, sometime we look at our own experiences on life and know how things can be
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Old 23-07-2013, 21:00
Fizgig
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Calm down dear you'll get indigestion, ask PA for an alka seltza.
Doubt he has any left, big job last time he used them.
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Old 23-07-2013, 21:02
NotaTypo
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It would be very weedy of me not to join in as I have slated Emily, purely on what I've seen of her on PA's Reality Show, which IMO is someone a bit dreary, not much personality & I truly believe she tries to portray herself as timid, shy etc but deep down she absolutely loves the fame & attention she's getting from being the girlfriend of PA.

Also, just my opinion but I think she is very silly to tie herself down with a child at such a young age, especially at the start of a new career & one that has taken years of work to qualify in, obviously she can return to work when she feels the time is right but I was always under the impression she wanted to work abroad, not very practical or realistic with a young child.
Pete already has housekeeper and a nanny for the other 2. Shouldn't be too big a deal to add another to their workload.
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Old 23-07-2013, 21:04
Scotty 567
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No, it doesn't have to mean the end of her career but training to be a doctor is bloody hard work and having a baby to look after as well as work 12 hour shifts means a very difficult juggling act. Even with a nanny and family support, qualifying as a doctor whilst being a parent will be a big challenge.

In my honest opinion, it would have been so much better to wait 5 years until she was properly qualified and working within her specialist field. At the end of the day, they're adults and they make their own choices but, sometime we look at our own experiences on life and know how things can be
I do understand all of that, of course. It was just that some posters were saying that she had blown her medical career and had wasted her studies, that is what I was querying.
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Old 23-07-2013, 21:24
Betty Britain
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If someone has studied to be a doctor, why should it then be judged that the man is the one at fault if she then gets pregnant.

She knows what happens, so if she then gets pregnant and is happy about it, what is there for anyone else to comment about, apart from being happy at her decision.
I fully agree ..it takes two to tango.. And she is responsible for her birth control as well as him...
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Old 23-07-2013, 22:00
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I am flabbergasted by the comments on here! as an occasional lurker on this thread but too unknowledgeable about PA to post, I actually can't believe some of the comments about someone's career on here!

Having a degree is a badge that states that you have the basic knowledge to do a job, be it a doctor or any other profession. This badge last a lifetime, and can be shown off at any opportunity. Many students take a couple of years out from their studies to do something different for a few years, and many end up doing jobs to earn money while they try to get a foot on the bottom rung of the career ladder, which these days is actually more of a jungle gym.

If women like Emily actually thought about their career in great detail they would find that the best time to start a family is after you retire, when you have the mortgage paid off, a sizable disposable income and enough time to devote to your children without the distraction of work. But we all know that this is a silly idea as women should be trying to complete their families before the age of 35.

I can see why she would take a couple of years out to take stock of her career and have a break to have children, she will be financially well provided for and will not have to make the difficult compromises that Mums like myself do. I love my job, and built a career before having a baby at 33 years old - but now I have to work full time, and I work in the evenings and weekends, I have to pay nursery fees which cost me a fortune and eat up a large amount of my pay. TBH if I had had a child at the start of my career I would have been more likely to be allowed to have flexible working, a job share or part time working. Its easier to recruit for these posts at lower grades and levels of seniority. If I had my time again I think that I would have had a child much younger...

Finally what is wrong at taking a career break now... how many students take gap years to go travelling for a few years and delay starting work? How many doctors qualify as mature students? Ultimately it's her choice to do what she likes, so why should we judge women and dictate when they should have children... there is rarely a perfect time... and I believe that it is a woman's right to choose their own work - life balance without unfair criticism...

it just makes me wonder what ever happened to feminism... I thought it allowed women to be able to make their own choices, but some people seem to imply that if you are smart enough to have a degree you are somehow dumb to start a family at a young age - which I couldn't disagree with more!
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Old 23-07-2013, 22:16
artlesschaos
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I am flabbergasted by the comments on here! as an occasional lurker on this thread but too unknowledgeable about PA to post, I actually can't believe some of the comments about someone's career on here!

Having a degree is a badge that states that you have the basic knowledge to do a job, be it a doctor or any other profession. This badge last a lifetime, and can be shown off at any opportunity. Many students take a couple of years out from their studies to do something different for a few years, and many end up doing jobs to earn money while they try to get a foot on the bottom rung of the career ladder, which these days is actually more of a jungle gym.

If women like Emily actually thought about their career in great detail they would find that the best time to start a family is after you retire, when you have the mortgage paid off, a sizable disposable income and enough time to devote to your children without the distraction of work. But we all know that this is a silly idea as women should be trying to complete their families before the age of 35.

I can see why she would take a couple of years out to take stock of her career and have a break to have children, she will be financially well provided for and will not have to make the difficult compromises that Mums like myself do. I love my job, and built a career before having a baby at 33 years old - but now I have to work full time, and I work in the evenings and weekends, I have to pay nursery fees which cost me a fortune and eat up a large amount of my pay. TBH if I had had a child at the start of my career I would have been more likely to be allowed to have flexible working, a job share or part time working. Its easier to recruit for these posts at lower grades and levels of seniority. If I had my time again I think that I would have had a child much younger...

Finally what is wrong at taking a career break now... how many students take gap years to go travelling for a few years and delay starting work? How many doctors qualify as mature students? Ultimately it's her choice to do what she likes, so why should we judge women and dictate when they should have children... there is rarely a perfect time... and I believe that it is a woman's right to choose their own work - life balance without unfair criticism...

it just makes me wonder what ever happened to feminism... I thought it allowed women to be able to make their own choices, but some people seem to imply that if you are smart enough to have a degree you are somehow dumb to start a family at a young age - which I couldn't disagree with more!
If you have just spent a fortune of the taxpayers money training, then the baby can surely wait a couple of years? As you say, she is not going to have the same worries financially as most working mothers do, so waiting a couple of years to get her demanding career started would not have been a hardship - she is not in her late thirties, she is a very young woman.

Feminism does not mean that women have the right to do what they want, when they want - just that they should have equal rights to men. Women spending a few years training then buggering off to have kids before it finishes are going to make it easier for places to choose a male trainee over a female.
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Old 23-07-2013, 22:22
Scotty 567
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I am flabbergasted by the comments on here! as an occasional lurker on this thread but too unknowledgeable about PA to post, I actually can't believe some of the comments about someone's career on here!

Having a degree is a badge that states that you have the basic knowledge to do a job, be it a doctor or any other profession. This badge last a lifetime, and can be shown off at any opportunity. Many students take a couple of years out from their studies to do something different for a few years, and many end up doing jobs to earn money while they try to get a foot on the bottom rung of the career ladder, which these days is actually more of a jungle gym.

If women like Emily actually thought about their career in great detail they would find that the best time to start a family is after you retire, when you have the mortgage paid off, a sizable disposable income and enough time to devote to your children without the distraction of work. But we all know that this is a silly idea as women should be trying to complete their families before the age of 35.

I can see why she would take a couple of years out to take stock of her career and have a break to have children, she will be financially well provided for and will not have to make the difficult compromises that Mums like myself do. I love my job, and built a career before having a baby at 33 years old - but now I have to work full time, and I work in the evenings and weekends, I have to pay nursery fees which cost me a fortune and eat up a large amount of my pay. TBH if I had had a child at the start of my career I would have been more likely to be allowed to have flexible working, a job share or part time working. Its easier to recruit for these posts at lower grades and levels of seniority. If I had my time again I think that I would have had a child much younger...

Finally what is wrong at taking a career break now... how many students take gap years to go travelling for a few years and delay starting work? How many doctors qualify as mature students? Ultimately it's her choice to do what she likes, so why should we judge women and dictate when they should have children... there is rarely a perfect time... and I believe that it is a woman's right to choose their own work - life balance without unfair criticism...

it just makes me wonder what ever happened to feminism... I thought it allowed women to be able to make their own choices, but some people seem to imply that if you are smart enough to have a degree you are somehow dumb to start a family at a young age - which I couldn't disagree with more!
Lion, I take my hat off to you, a great post.
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Old 23-07-2013, 22:26
lexi22
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I am flabbergasted by the comments on here! as an occasional lurker on this thread but too unknowledgeable about PA to post, I actually can't believe some of the comments about someone's career on here!
Knowledge of PA is pretty pertinent to the conversation. It's actually at the heart of it. While I don't agree with a lot of the points of view put forward as far as Emily's career is concerned, they are nevertheless coming from a valid place in a PA context.
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Old 23-07-2013, 22:39
lion5
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If you have just spent a fortune of the taxpayers money training, then the baby can surely wait a couple of years? As you say, she is not going to have the same worries financially as most working mothers do, so waiting a couple of years to get her demanding career started would not have been a hardship - she is not in her late thirties, she is a very young woman.

Feminism does not mean that women have the right to do what they want, when they want - just that they should have equal rights to men. Women spending a few years training then buggering off to have kids before it finishes are going to make it easier for places to choose a male trainee over a female.
Whether she has kids now or later on its likely that she will take the same time out of her career whatever age she has them. Employers tend to choose men over women because they fear that they will loose the worker for maternity leave, and career breaks - plenty of them have been on BBC breakfast staking that they prefer to recruit women after they complete their families father than young women for that reason.

The taxpayer no longer funds university education... when I graduated over 10 years ago I gulped at my student loan when it stood at 13k, now graduates have fees and debts of 40-50k for medical degrees.. all repayable with interest - and they payments don't stop until you are 65 years old. With the interest I will have paid on my student loans the government will have recouped approx. 30k from me, so by delaying starting work she will actually end up repaying more! I have always worked, and made repayments on my loan through my salary every month... its is an additional 10% tax on earnings over 15k in my case... but until I earned over 24k a year my debt actually grew, this is on top of the 4.5% interest I was paying on my loan until last year (the rate only dropped to 1.5% a year ago) from the first day I started uni.

Feminism means that women have the ability to determine their careers and when they start a family, without judgment - its not like she is a 13 year old school girl mum who has left education without any formal qualifications, instead it seems that people believe that because she is educated she shouldn't be allowed to have children. What an odd paradox!

Finally if you think it is easier to have children later on the I would disagree... you have to complete continuing professional development forever...undertake formal post graduate studies just to maintain chartership, and as you progress through your career it becomes more demanding and takes up more of your family time... you earn more, but you have to work harder to justify the cash. Its not like you get to a senior role and find that you get paid more to do less work.
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Old 23-07-2013, 22:41
Nicola32
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Peter had no right to comment on her pregnancy..but he did...why is he immune from critacism when he does these things?? Some people make excuses from him like he is a child

What has he publicly commented on with regards to her pregnancy? What was the comment he made?

You'll have to enlighten me Betty as I am not aware of him publicly commenting on her pregnancy at all.
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Old 23-07-2013, 22:48
lion5
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Knowledge of PA is pretty pertinent to the conversation. It's actually at the heart of it. While I don't agree with a lot of the points of view put forward as far as Emily's career is concerned, they are nevertheless coming from a valid place in a PA context.
Which is why I have not commented on him.. I don't watch reality TV, and have never bought any of his music or general stuff that comes with him...I have never followed pop music, or had his poster on my wall...

I do know about raising children and careers... I have just commented on the comments that I feel I do know about which have been discussed in great detail for several pages on this thread, which is quite a bit off topic from the title. Its hardly suffering.. when a couple are happy about having a baby.

I hope Emily is happy and enjoys motherhood, its brilliant... and kudos to her for making her own life decisions, and not feeling pressured to delay her life choices because she is able to pass a degree.
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Old 23-07-2013, 22:56
artlesschaos
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Whether she has kids now or later on its likely that she will take the same time out of her career whatever age she has them. Employers tend to choose men over women because they fear that they will loose the worker for maternity leave, and career breaks - plenty of them have been on BBC breakfast staking that they prefer to recruit women after they complete their families father than young women for that reason.

The taxpayer no longer funds university education... when I graduated over 10 years ago I gulped at my student loan when it stood at 13k, now graduates have fees and debts of 40-50k for medical degrees.. all repayable with interest - and they payments don't stop until you are 65 years old. With the interest I will have paid on my student loans the government will have recouped approx. 30k from me, so by delaying starting work she will actually end up repaying more! I have always worked, and made repayments on my loan through my salary every month... its is an additional 10% tax on earnings over 15k in my case... but until I earned over 24k a year my debt actually grew, this is on top of the 4.5% interest I was paying on my loan until last year (the rate only dropped to 1.5% a year ago) from the first day I started uni.

Feminism means that women have the ability to determine their careers and when they start a family, without judgment - its not like she is a 13 year old school girl mum who has left education without any formal qualifications, instead it seems that people believe that because she is educated she shouldn't be allowed to have children. What an odd paradox!

Finally if you think it is easier to have children later on the I would disagree... you have to complete continuing professional development forever...undertake formal post graduate studies just to maintain chartership, and as you progress through your career it becomes more demanding and takes up more of your family time... you earn more, but you have to work harder to justify the cash. Its not like you get to a senior role and find that you get paid more to do less work.
Once you are established and in work, your maternity pay is better and you return at the same level you left, yes?

The cost of training a doctor is stated here: http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...49641647,d.ZWU

I don't think anyone suggests that she should not have children. She is 23, time was hardly running out for her.
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Old 23-07-2013, 23:11
lion5
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Once you are established and in work, your maternity pay is better and you return at the same level you left, yes?

The cost of training a doctor is stated here: http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...49641647,d.ZWU

I don't think anyone suggests that she should not have children. She is 23, time was hardly running out for her.
By having a break now she will not be collecting maternity pay, so no cost to the tax payer - statutory maternity pay is set at 90% of your salary for 6 weeks and then the statutory £130ish a week after that for the remaining 9 months. You are entitled to return to your previous role, but at the previous terms and condition - if you were full time, you return full time, employers are not obliged to provide you with flexible working or part time hours, you can ask but they can refuse, you may be offered a more junior role to fit in with your work life balance but not even this can be guaranteed.

The statutory maternity pay level of £130ish doesn't vary according to tax paid or income - in the public sector you may get as much as 12-16 weeks pay from your employer... at between 75 - 100% of your salary. I would say that if you are a higher earner £130 per week won't be enough to support your lifestyle which is why many higher income mums take less maternity leave on average.

She may be 23 but PA is getting on a bit... and I am sure they don't want to wait until he is in his 50s to start a family, maybe Emily wants to have a fit and healthy hands on father for her child? But as far as I am aware 23 is above the legal age of consent for sex, and therefore the legal age to start a family - she is old enough to make her own decisions -what right has anyone to judge her?

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Old 23-07-2013, 23:25
artlesschaos
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By having a break now she will not be collecting maternity pay, so no cost to the tax payer - statutory maternity pay is set at 90% of your salary for 6 weeks and then the statutory £130ish a week after that for the remaining 9 months. You are entitled to return to your previous role, but at the previous terms and condition - if you were full time, you return full time, employers are not obliged to provide you with flexible working or part time hours, you can ask but they can refuse, you may be offered a more junior role to fit in with your work life balance but not even this can be guaranteed.

The statutory maternity pay level of £130ish doesn't vary according to tax paid or income - in the public sector you may get as much as 12-16 weeks pay from your employer... at between 75 - 100% of your salary. I would say that if you are a higher earner £130 per week won't be enough to support your lifestyle which is why many higher income mums take less maternity leave on average.

She may be 23 but PA is getting on a bit... and I am sure they don't want to wait until he is in his 50s to start a family, maybe Emily wants to have a fit and healthy hands on father for her child? But as far as I am aware 23 is above the legal age of consent for sex, and therefore the legal age to start a family - she is old enough to make her own decisions -what right has anyone to judge her?

Her maternity may not cost the tax payer, but her training has.

As to your final point, are you now saying she has made this choice based on Pa's needs? That kinda blows feminism out of the water.

As to the "right to judge" have we got the right to judge anyone? I guess the answer is no, but we do. Particularly those who make their living selling every aspect of their lives for public consumption.
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Old 23-07-2013, 23:46
lion5
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Her maternity may not cost the tax payer, but her training has.

As to your final point, are you now saying she has made this choice based on Pa's needs? That kinda blows feminism out of the water.

As to the "right to judge" have we got the right to judge anyone? I guess the answer is no, but we do. Particularly those who make their living selling every aspect of their lives for public consumption.
Here is a link that works to an article about the costs of postgraduate training - where Emily will be heading to next.. and wow its expensive http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advic...ml?id=20004902

When the figures were broken down into cost per year of training, anaesthetics was still the most expensive specialty, costing more than £3500 a year, followed closely by acute medicine and gastroenterology. Training as a GP cost more than £2000 a year.

Many junior doctors are unaware of these “invisible” costs associated with postgraduate training, said Ben Molyneux, deputy chairman of the BMA’s Junior Doctors Committee. “When it comes to specialty training a lot of junior doctors are getting to the stage in their lives where they want to buy their first home or start a family or get married,” he said. “It’s not a time when you want to be shelling out around £3000 a year on training if you weren’t planning on it.”


That's a good return for the tax payer... and they actually have a useful member of society that provides an invaluable service - a couple of years break in a 50 year career is not the end of the world, and if she had the child at any age it is likely she would have taken a career break for the same amount of time.

As other posters have highlighted Emily hasn't sold any of her personal details or that of her unborn baby to the media, and therefore by your own logic, no one has the right to judge her! The child's father yes.. but not her!

Finally, I did not state that she chose when to start a family based on PAs needs - quite the opposite, I said:

She may be 23 but PA is getting on a bit... and I am sure they don't want to wait until he is in his 50s to start a family, maybe Emily wants to have a fit and healthy hands on father for her child? But as far as I am aware 23 is above the legal age of consent for sex, and therefore the legal age to start a family - she is old enough to make her own decisions -what right has anyone to judge her?
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Old 23-07-2013, 23:52
artlesschaos
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Here is a link that works to an article about the costs of postgraduate training - where Emily will be heading to next.. and wow its expensive http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advic...ml?id=20004902

When the figures were broken down into cost per year of training, anaesthetics was still the most expensive specialty, costing more than £3500 a year, followed closely by acute medicine and gastroenterology. Training as a GP cost more than £2000 a year.

Many junior doctors are unaware of these “invisible” costs associated with postgraduate training, said Ben Molyneux, deputy chairman of the BMA’s Junior Doctors Committee. “When it comes to specialty training a lot of junior doctors are getting to the stage in their lives where they want to buy their first home or start a family or get married,” he said. “It’s not a time when you want to be shelling out around £3000 a year on training if you weren’t planning on it.”


As other posters have highlighted Emily hasn't sold any of her personal details or that of her unborn baby to the media, and therefore by your own logic, no one has the right to judge her! The child's father yes.. but not her!

Finally, I did not state that she chose when to start a family based on PAs needs - quite the opposite, I said:

She may be 23 but PA is getting on a bit... and I am sure they don't want to wait until he is in his 50s to start a family, maybe Emily wants to have a fit and healthy hands on father for her child? But as far as I am aware 23 is above the legal age of consent for sex, and therefore the legal age to start a family - she is old enough to make her own decisions -what right has anyone to judge her?
Emily is having a baby with a man who has sold every aspect of the lives of her other children. Emily appears in his reality show which uses his children. Emily is, by your own admission, a highly educated young woman, so is therefore fully aware of the "for sale" sign on her and her child's life.

You can't have it all ways - is she choosing to have this child or not? If she is, she also chose the father...the father whose age has (according to you) been a major consideration in the conception of this child and she chose to go along with the "She's having my baby" poses in the paper the other week...and she will be going along with the price ticket on the baby's head.
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Old 24-07-2013, 00:14
Kat_12
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I am flabbergasted by the comments on here! as an occasional lurker on this thread but too unknowledgeable about PA to post, I actually can't believe some of the comments about someone's career on here!

Having a degree is a badge that states that you have the basic knowledge to do a job, be it a doctor or any other profession. This badge last a lifetime, and can be shown off at any opportunity. Many students take a couple of years out from their studies to do something different for a few years, and many end up doing jobs to earn money while they try to get a foot on the bottom rung of the career ladder, which these days is actually more of a jungle gym.

If women like Emily actually thought about their career in great detail they would find that the best time to start a family is after you retire, when you have the mortgage paid off, a sizable disposable income and enough time to devote to your children without the distraction of work. But we all know that this is a silly idea as women should be trying to complete their families before the age of 35.

I can see why she would take a couple of years out to take stock of her career and have a break to have children, she will be financially well provided for and will not have to make the difficult compromises that Mums like myself do. I love my job, and built a career before having a baby at 33 years old - but now I have to work full time, and I work in the evenings and weekends, I have to pay nursery fees which cost me a fortune and eat up a large amount of my pay. TBH if I had had a child at the start of my career I would have been more likely to be allowed to have flexible working, a job share or part time working. Its easier to recruit for these posts at lower grades and levels of seniority. If I had my time again I think that I would have had a child much younger...

Finally what is wrong at taking a career break now... how many students take gap years to go travelling for a few years and delay starting work? How many doctors qualify as mature students? Ultimately it's her choice to do what she likes, so why should we judge women and dictate when they should have children... there is rarely a perfect time... and I believe that it is a woman's right to choose their own work - life balance without unfair criticism...

it just makes me wonder what ever happened to feminism... I thought it allowed women to be able to make their own choices, but some people seem to imply that if you are smart enough to have a degree you are somehow dumb to start a family at a young age - which I couldn't disagree with more!


You place repeated emphasis on how women should be free to make their own choices, but dictate when women should have children.
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Old 24-07-2013, 00:25
lion5
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Emily is having a baby with a man who has sold every aspect of the lives of her other children. Emily appears in his reality show which uses his children. Emily is, by your own admission, a highly educated young woman, so is therefore fully aware of the "for sale" sign on her and her child's life.

You can't have it all ways - is she choosing to have this child or not? If she is, she also chose the father...the father whose age has (according to you) been a major consideration in the conception of this child and she chose to go along with the "She's having my baby" poses in the paper the other week...and she will be going along with the price ticket on the baby's head.
I see no 'for sale sign' on her head, and no one has seen the babies head (that would be ridiculous as that scan is obviously private) to see a 'for sale' sign on that too

Again you have misrepresented my comments in your posts - where have I stated that PAs age has been a major consideration in anything? I have clearly stated a biological fact, and emphasised that this may have been a consideration for Emily - not PA. Of course the word may denotes speculation on my part... it may have nothing to do with his age - it may be that she just loves little baby clothes and wants to have a baby to have a legitimate excuse to buy them

I am not aware that she has any parental rights or responsibilities or exerts any influence over how PAs children by KP are raised - so how can you compare how she will raise her child with those that she has no authority over?

I am not aware that she has ever received monetary gain from her relationship with PA- from the TV show or from any other means. so by your own logic:

As to the "right to judge" have we got the right to judge anyone? I guess the answer is no, but we do. Particularly those who make their living selling every aspect of their lives for public consumption.


It seems that you are perturbed by the fact she is educated but wants to start a family and that is the crux of your posts - and have resorted to dragging tax payers like myself into the argument, and widly speculating about how a baby may be raised

As a tax payer and a feminist I will never object to women choosing to have children when they are ready - firstly because we have an aging population and we need more births to generate the next generation of taxpayer to provide for those who are older - and secondly who should dictate the age of a woman to start a family as long as it is within the laws of the land which states 16 as the age of consent for sex and therefore becoming pregnant!

Lets face it.. what has she really done to deserve anyone's wrath... apart from get a degree and want to start a family!
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