Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 

Marguerite Daisy


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-04-2010, 22:11
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685

On a bit of an impulse today, we bought a couple of Standard Marguerite Dasies, simply because they seemed so different to the usual sort of trees we had looked at (we only wanted a very small tree, and conifers were about the only ones that fitted the bill size wise, but to be honest we've got them in the back garden so another would have been boring).

Anyway, they were on an offer if we bought two, so they now have their wee feet planted in the front garden - and very nice they look too.

However, I don't really have the foggiest idea about them - given that they have a reasonably thick trunk like stem, I have drawn the conclusion that they are pretty much a perennial? Some googling has revealed that deadheading them will encourage ongoing blooming through the summer, but that is about it as far as I can find by way of care instructions.

Will they survive winters? Is normal fertiliser OK, or is there some kind of special fertiliser for them?

Any hints or tips please
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 03-04-2010, 22:21
stud u like
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: The Sunny Side Of The Street
Posts: 38,015
They are difficult if you forget the rules.

They don't like to dry out but they hate wet feet. So moistening the soil helps but not a deluge as they are fussy plants and might faint on you.

They like their spent blooms removed.

Cut of some of the stems during the growing time so that it will get bushy and also keep the growth under control.

Prune it in the Spring time when new growth appears but only cut a third off it or will become stressed.

They do not like the temperature to get too cold. So you may need to protect them.
stud u like is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 22:24
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
They are difficult if you forget the rules.

They don't like to dry out but they hate wet feet. So moistening the soil helps but not a deluge as they are fussy plants and might faint on you.

They like their spent blooms removed.

Cut of some of the stems during the growing time so that it will get bushy and also keep the growth under control.

Prune it in the Spring time when new growth appears but only cut a third off it or will become stressed.

They do not like the temperature to get too cold. So you may need to protect them.
Thanks

Soil here is pretty well drained, so hopefully they'll be OK with that.

What protection would be suitable for overwintering them?
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 22:29
Sigurd
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 24,445
Yes, marguerites (argyranthemums) are perennials, and I believe they're technically sub-shrubs. However, they aren't frost-hardy, and so except in very mild areas they have to be overwintered in a house or greenhouse.

I grow them most summers and feed them with tomato fertiliser, which is high in potash and is supposed to encourage flowering. I generally throw them away in the autumn, but it is possible to keep them for another year or to overwinter cuttings.

http://www.wildaboutgardens.org/plan...rutescens.aspx

They do come in various yellows and pinks, but I prefer the plain single white ones.
Sigurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 22:32
stud u like
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: The Sunny Side Of The Street
Posts: 38,015
Thanks

Soil here is pretty well drained, so hopefully they'll be OK with that.

What protection would be suitable for overwintering them?
They are better in pots as you can bring them indoors or winter them in a garage.

Mine have not lasted a winter. They fainted on me.

I buy them yearly instead as they are very fussy plants.
stud u like is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 22:33
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
Thats a bit of a bugger - I suppose I could try lifting them and overwintering them in pots in the front porch. I don't have a greenhouse, so thats my best shot I think.
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 22:39
Sigurd
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 24,445
I find mine generally look pretty tatty by the autumn and so I don't try to overwinter them, though I suppose if I did so they might spruce up a bit in the early summer. It's not too hard to overwinter a potful of cuttings, though, and that takes up less space than overwintering fully-grown plants.

They can also be grown from seed:

http://www.eseeds.com/p-7487-argyran...ris-white.aspx
Sigurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 22:58
mirandashell
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Over there somewhere
Posts: 2,731
They are far too fussy for me. In my garden, a plant looks after itself or it's out!
mirandashell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 23:13
jojo01
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,646
Would covering them in fleece help over the winter months?
jojo01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 23:34
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
I find mine generally look pretty tatty by the autumn and so I don't try to overwinter them, though I suppose if I did so they might spruce up a bit in the early summer. It's not too hard to overwinter a potful of cuttings, though, and that takes up less space than overwintering fully-grown plants.

They can also be grown from seed:

http://www.eseeds.com/p-7487-argyran...ris-white.aspx
The ones I have bought are like wee trees though, a bit like a lollipop shape if that makes sense - the thickness of the trunk would suggest that they are at least a year old (if not more) - are these going to be the same as the wee ones?
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 08:35
Camino
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Buckinghamshire
Posts: 10,269
i had two of these but as far as i can tell havent made it through the winter, no green shoots or sign of life in them at all, very sad and they are non stop flowerers
Camino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 08:46
Sigurd
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 24,445
The ones I have bought are like wee trees though, a bit like a lollipop shape if that makes sense - the thickness of the trunk would suggest that they are at least a year old (if not more) - are these going to be the same as the wee ones?
The standard marguerites are certainly worth keeping for another year if you can, since I should think it would have taken several years to train them into the standard form. Some advice on overwintering:

Argyranthemum (marguerite)

Marguerites can be overwintered in several ways, but they must be kept frost free, Ideally, dont allow the temperature to fall below 5C (40F). I like to keep one or two flowering all winter by placing them in a heated greenhouse or conservatory. Otherwise, they can either be potted up individually and placed on the windowsill of a cool room, or placed under the staging in a heated conservatory or greenhouse. Alternatively, you can save space by packing several plants into a box. Lift the plants and cut back the stems before placing them in a crate topped up with just-moist compost. I successfully overwinter standards by trimming back this year's growth by about one-third and keep plants ticking over during the winter by placing them in a greenhouse with a minimum temperature of 5C (40F). You can also take cuttings now as insurance, kept at a minimum temperature of 7C (45F).
http://www.crocus.co.uk/features/_/a...rticleid.1114/

(That piece was advice for September.)

Incidentally, it's quite early to have put them outside. They've come from being grown inside in high temperatures and sheltered from the elements, and they may suffer from being put straight outside into the wind, rain and (quite possibly) frost. It would have been better to have hardened them off before planting them outside, and I think it would still be wise to take them inside at night, particularly if low temperatures are forecast. A more normal time for putting tender plants outside would be late May or early June. You could be lucky, though.
Sigurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 09:04
GetMeOuttaHere
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Out of my head!
Posts: 16,335
i had two of these but as far as i can tell havent made it through the winter, no green shoots or sign of life in them at all, very sad and they are non stop flowerers
They do take time to show new growth, be patient. Are they in pots or the ground? I had a couple a few years ago, had them in pots and they died over winter, my neighbour put hers in the ground and it survived.
GetMeOuttaHere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 09:25
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
Ah, so my complete lack of gardening knowhow shows itself again The only thing I can hope is that the mild weather that we tend to get here actually stays with us. They are reasonably sheltered in terms of wind etc thanks to the fact that most of my garden is set low (you step down from the path into the garden.

I think I'll see how they fare through the summer, then put them in a couple of nice earthenware pots for winter so that I can winter them in the front porch (heated, but never really gets all that warm, but equally never gets all that cold) - if they survive that, I'll out them out in their pots as patio plants next year.

Meantime, I can be looking at suitable small ornamental trees to fill the borders when I take these out. Any suggestions?

Now, being really cheeky (you love me really?), I bought 80 mixed gladioli bulbs, and 50 double freesia bulbs yesterday - any special planting instructions for these before I go an wallop them in the ground with all the finesse of a baby elephant?
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 09:27
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
They do take time to show new growth, be patient. Are they in pots or the ground? I had a couple a few years ago, had them in pots and they died over winter, my neighbour put hers in the ground and it survived.
Did she leave them out all winter? Any protection?
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 11:15
Camino
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Buckinghamshire
Posts: 10,269
They do take time to show new growth, be patient. Are they in pots or the ground? I had a couple a few years ago, had them in pots and they died over winter, my neighbour put hers in the ground and it survived.
they are in pots on the patio and i did protect them in the coldest weather, i will just leave them and see what happens i really i hope they are ok but they look shocking at the mo they are about 3 years old
Camino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-02-2011, 13:13
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
Well, winter came and barely getting a day off work between August and January, I didn't get a chance to do anything with my standard Marguerites - they now look positively dead, with not a scrap of green on them at all, so I reckon they have had it. My mum however, advises that they will most likely come bouncing back - does this sound right, or should I just whip them out now and get on with looking for a replacement?
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-02-2011, 14:01
Sigurd
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 24,445
The Burncoose Nursery website says of argyranthemums (marguerites): "Half hardy - Plant can withstand temperatures down to 0C (32F)." I doubt if there's anywhere in the UK that didn't experience temperatures much lower than that during November and December, so I strongly suspect, FC, that your plants will be dead.

People sometimes confuse Argyranthemum frutescens with chrysanthemums, and in fact the old name for argyranthemum was Chrysanthemum frutescens, but they're nowhere near as hardy as true chrysanthemums.

However, it's not beyond the bounds of possibility that your plants might still show some signs of life in the next few months, so you might be as well to wait for a bit before you decide to chuck them out. It's not a great time for planting anything else anyway.
Sigurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-02-2011, 14:04
tomharry2
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: at the crossroads
Posts: 4,030
They will not survive a british winter in the garage or in the garden.

Your only hope is a heated glass house. Not worth the hasle.

if they sold it to you as a perennial in the UK, youve been had.
tomharry2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-02-2011, 14:10
Sigurd
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 24,445
Supposedly they'll survive mild winters outside in Cornwall, but I should think that even there the past two winters would have killed them.
Sigurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-02-2011, 16:43
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
Ah well, looks like they have most likely had it then. They were only bought on the strength that they were a bit different and tall enough to fill the spaces. Ideally, I would like some kind of hardy, standard fuschia - but don't know if such a thing exists.

I'll tidy up around them for now, and give them a wee haircut so they don't look just as bad, and give them a few weeks to see what happens - once proven dead, I'll have to hit the garden centre

Thanks
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-02-2011, 17:15
Sigurd
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 24,445
From a page on fuchsias:

How do I overwinter a standard?

First point although many hardy fuchsia varieties make good standards, no standard is hardy. ALL standards no matter what the variety need to be kept in during the winter at a minimum of 5C, this is because you must not let the plant die back.
http://www.findthatfuchsia.info/tips...dard%20fuchsia

If you want a hardy standard or half standard tree or shrub, you'd need to go for something else. I don't know much about such things, but a few possibilities are bay tree, cotoneaster or rose, though no doubt there are quite a few others.
Sigurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-02-2011, 19:19
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
Thanks Sigurd - need to do some homework then. It appears that my Japanese Acer has bit the dust too over the winter
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2011, 14:09
fat controller
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Slightly round the bend
Posts: 12,685
Well, having just been out to take the dead heads off my hydrangeas, and generally tidy up, I can confirm that the Marguerites are stone dead - all dried out and brittle, so there was no point leaving them where they were - they're now in the recycling bag

The good news is that my Acer has some wee buds on it, so it now appears to have survived
fat controller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2011, 15:37
soda syphon
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: east midlands
Posts: 219
Thanks Sigurd - need to do some homework then. It appears that my Japanese Acer has bit the dust too over the winter
Don't give up on your Japanese acer yet, round here (north Midlands) the lowest temp got down to -15 degrees centigrade and Im sure all my Japanese acers have survived.
soda syphon is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:13.