Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 
 

Equipment to transfer vinyl etc. to CD


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 14-02-2011, 20:55
ThePenkethPedan
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 198

Noticed a big ad in a paper recently which offered a sort of record player which had the function to transfer a vinyl LP recording to a CD (without using a computer). It would also copy audio cassette tapes to CD. Has anyone tried this type of machine or had any reports on its effectiveness? The ad suggested that the price of 199.99 would be saving the purchaser 100. Any alternative methods known?
ThePenkethPedan is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 14-02-2011, 22:10
pocatello
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 8,623
Cheap decks have cheap cartridges.
Yes they work, but they transfer crap onto cd, defeating the point.
pocatello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2011, 23:10
c4rv
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Essex
Posts: 14,232
If you have a PC with a CD writer then you could use something like this. quality is not going to be up to sondeck quality but its OK for basic transfer.

http://www.google.co.uk/products/cat...d=0CEkQ8wIwAQ#

You can use something like Audacity to clean up the recordings and split the tracks up.

http://audacity.sourceforge.net/about/
c4rv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2011, 23:19
pocatello
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 8,623
Main thing is you cannot put garbage into the recording device. If you are spending the time to record a vinyl record, you should do it right with quality equipment. Otherwise you are just producing completely inferior sound. No special equipment required, even old record decks can be used to record to cd.
pocatello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 08:44
c4rv
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Essex
Posts: 14,232
TBH, I havn't used a record player in a while so I am not going to be able to comment on how much difference there is. If I remember quality of the pressing makes as much difference as the player. And if you are talking about very old records, chances are the quality is not great to being with.

Thing about this of course you could this pretty much for free if you have a record player connect to a amp with headphone socket that you can connect to the audio in on your PC. Then use Audacity for doing the recording.

TBH, my first choice would be to download the tracks rather then convert them.
c4rv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 09:00
Glawster2002
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Nailsworth, Gloucestershire
Posts: 6,687
I kept all of my vinyl so I still have a decent turntable. To convert vinyl to digital I use a Terratec PhonoPreAmp which connects to the Tape Out connections on my amp.

It comes with Algorithmix Sound Rescue software, which is a tool for removing noise, etc.

I found the easiest way is to record the whole side of vinyl and then use Sound Rescue to "clean up" the recording and edit the single recording in to the individual tracks.

The recording is a WAV file so it is uncompressed, so then it is a simple process to convert the tracks from WAV to, for example, mp3.
Glawster2002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 09:21
TeeGee
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: 53N 2W
Posts: 2,029
There is no easy answer to this. Copying the record still seems to leave noticeable crackles and down loading (as previously suggested) takes time.

I tend to look for the tracks I want on sale price CDs. Sad as it may sound I got 75 tracks of Elvis Presley for under 6 recently from Play.com
TeeGee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 09:33
radioman2
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,269
There is no easy answer to this. Copying the record still seems to leave noticeable crackles and down loading (as previously suggested) takes time.

I tend to look for the tracks I want on sale price CDs. Sad as it may sound I got 75 tracks of Elvis Presley for under 6 recently from Play.com
If you could track down a "Wet"record cleaning machine you could clean the vinyl with suitable cleaning liquid and effectively vacuum nearly all of the crud away.This will make for a far cleaner sound without the need to rely on electronic filtering which invariably degrade the sound you'd end up with.
radioman2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 14:19
pilgrim42
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Lytham-St.Annes Lancs.
Posts: 282
If you could track down a "Wet"record cleaning machine you could clean the vinyl with suitable cleaning liquid and effectively vacuum nearly all of the crud away.This will make for a far cleaner sound without the need to rely on electronic filtering which invariably degrade the sound you'd end up with.
I've recently transferred a dozen vinyls to a Brennand JB7 home "Juke box" system from a Dual CS 5000 deck with an Ortophon cartridge through my Kandy L3 amp. and the results were astonishingly good, although it was a long-winded procedure. Particularly striking was a 42-year-old Bert Kaempfert recording (OK,OK, it was popular back then) which sounds like new: no surface noise and only one track I had to miss out due to a scratch from long ago.How glad am I that I held on to the old kit. Since it was a one-off operation, I lightly sprayed the vinyl with distilled water as it played, to eliminate lingering static. Worked a treat.
Cheers, Mike
pilgrim42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 14:25
spiney2
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16,194
Plug an easy cap into the output of any record deck.

Select "audio only".

http://easycap.co.uk/
spiney2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 15:05
Nigel Goodwin
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: North Derbyshire
Posts: 36,815
Plug an easy cap into the output of any record deck.
Except there's no phono preamp in the Easycap, so almost all record decks won't work with it - only the tiny number of modern ones with built-in preamps.

Just buy a phono preamp and plug it in to the sound card input on your PC.
Nigel Goodwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 15:16
pilgrim42
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Lytham-St.Annes Lancs.
Posts: 282
Except there's no phono preamp in the Easycap, so almost all record decks won't work with it - only the tiny number of modern ones with built-in preamps.

Just buy a phono preamp and plug it in to the sound card input on your PC.
Good point, Nigel. A lot of the young 'uns don't realise the output from the deck needs equalisation to get it right.
Mike.
pilgrim42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 15:52
grahamlthompson
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Redditch Worcs
Posts: 15,292
Good point, Nigel. A lot of the young 'uns don't realise the output from the deck needs equalisation to get it right.
Mike.
El cheapo crystal cartridges will be OK. It's the quality moving Magnet or Moving Coil ones that need preamplification and RIAA equalisation.
grahamlthompson is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 15:57
Nigel Goodwin
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: North Derbyshire
Posts: 36,815
El cheapo crystal cartridges will be OK. It's the quality moving Magnet or Moving Coil ones that need preamplification and RIAA equalisation.
The EasyCap is unlikely to have a high enough input impedance for a crystal (or ceramic) cartridge, they require inputs in the megaohms. A normal line input (as the EasyCap) will be MUCH too low, and result in a severe lack of bass.
Nigel Goodwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 17:33
Richard46
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: London
Posts: 32,851
I favour just playing vinyl on a half decent deck.
Richard46 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 17:56
radioman2
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,269
The EasyCap is unlikely to have a high enough input impedance for a crystal (or ceramic) cartridge, they require inputs in the megaohms. A normal line input (as the EasyCap) will be MUCH too low, and result in a severe lack of bass.
The equalization will be way out as well although it's fairly easy to buy Phono preamps although it makes the Easycap rather redundant.I did wonder whether the electret condenser cartridges once used in some top end Toshiba turntables might work,these were fitted in the days of Quadraphonic L.Ps so there probably aren't many of those still in use.
radioman2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 18:13
spiney2
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16,194
ok, sorry, I wasn;t specific enough.

A ceramic cartridge has flat output, and the easycap a buffer amp. However, good point about the RIAA response, if a mag cartridge.

Yeah, just plug straight into pc sound card (mike or line input), then use recording freeware, that should also work. Mike level would be ok for mag cart, and you can pre-equalise for riaa.
spiney2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 19:38
Nigel Goodwin
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: North Derbyshire
Posts: 36,815
ok, sorry, I wasn;t specific enough.

A ceramic cartridge has flat output, and the easycap a buffer amp. However, good point about the RIAA response, if a mag cartridge.
I can't find any spec on the EasyCap, but I would be VERY confident it doesn't have a high input impedance - it would be a poor design if it did for it's intended useage.

Both ceramic and crystal pickups require 2 megaohms or so, I would expect the EasyCap to only be around 50 kohms.
Nigel Goodwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 19:50
puchica
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 441
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Steepletone-...7802611&sr=8-6

Amazon have this for 144 although mine was 120 before Xmas.

It works a treat and allows you to copy vinyl or cassettes to USB stick or sd card.
It does not have a cd burner but as I have all my tracks on my PS3 (which I selected for music storage over the over priced Brennan ) or IPOD I felt I could miss out on the cd burner .
Of course once you have all the tracks on the sd card or memory stick you can burn a cd using the PC if you really want one.

The unit also has a button to divide tracks into indivdual tracks on the USB but you need to sit there in real time so I copy the whole vinyl to USB then use Wavepad Sound Editor ( free program)on the PC to do all the division but if you don't want to use the PC it can do the whole job if necessary.

There are thousands of vinyl tracks that are not available to download legally or illegally and I got fed up with searching so I got one and its been great fo hear the old vinyl albums I've not heard for years although the crackles and pops of used vinyl still make cd preferable if possible
puchica is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 20:02
RobPyatt
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 95
I do all my recordings using my hi fi gear, connected to a second hand laptop.

For software, I use Audacityfor all the recording, cleaning up (you can remove obvious cliks very easily), and splitting up into track.

The results are, obviously, dependent on the quality of the original record, but usually sound fine.

The same laptop also acts as a media centre for playback, and also has spotify on it for even more music!
RobPyatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 21:42
RobAnt
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: South West
Posts: 10,218
I do all my recordings using my hi fi gear, connected to a second hand laptop.

For software, I use Audacityfor all the recording, cleaning up (you can remove obvious cliks very easily), and splitting up into track.

The results are, obviously, dependent on the quality of the original record, but usually sound fine.

The same laptop also acts as a media centre for playback, and also has spotify on it for even more music!
Pretty much ditto.

I feed my turntable (Pro-Ject Debut III fitted with a Goldring 1010 magnetic cartridge) via a NAD phono-amp into my AV receiver and take a line-out from there into my PC.

I too use Audacity to record and split the tracks, which are then converted to MP3 320kbps files. These files are copied to my MP3 player, so I can play them in the car.

Very very rarely do I feel the need to tamper and erradicate ticks and pops.

Ticks and pops can be relieved by keeping your LPs free of static and proper use of a wet cleaning regime.

The wet cleaning needs to be done properly, though, otherwise you can end up with sludge in the grooves. Even so, you don't need to spend more than 40 on a wet cleaning device, and the occasionally 15-20 on solution and distilled & deionised (both) clean water.

My albums are cleaned about once every 10 years or so!

I wouldn't be seen dead with an Ion or (worse) a Steepletone anything. Toneams and stylii that rely on weight to stay in the groove have the same qualities as a hot plough through cream. The friction involved melts the groove slightly and after just a few playings the more minute detail is simply worn away.
RobAnt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 22:01
ThePenkethPedan
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 198
Thanks,guys -will attempt to assimilate all your info, and come to a conclusion. I note that no-one seems to have used ths system on offer.
ThePenkethPedan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2011, 22:06
RobAnt
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: South West
Posts: 10,218
Thanks,guys -will attempt to assimilate all your info, and come to a conclusion. I note that no-one seems to have used ths system on offer.
That's because you don't say what system you're talking about, just a generalised description (unless you've already addressed this point, beneath your original question).
RobAnt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-02-2011, 00:44
pocatello
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 8,623
If you could track down a "Wet"record cleaning machine you could clean the vinyl with suitable cleaning liquid and effectively vacuum nearly all of the crud away.This will make for a far cleaner sound without the need to rely on electronic filtering which invariably degrade the sound you'd end up with.
Or you can simply cover the record with elmers type childrens white glue, let it dry, and peel it off, taking all the crud with it.
pocatello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-02-2011, 10:05
2Bdecided
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Yorkshire
Posts: 4,236
Particularly striking was a 42-year-old Bert Kaempfert recording (OK,OK, it was popular back then) which sounds like new: no surface noise and only one track I had to miss out due to a scratch from long ago.
I bet it's available on CD. There are over 100 Bert Kaempfert tracks on Spofity (though bizarely none actually on the Polydor label - maybe they've blocked Spotify)


This is the definitive vinyl > PC/CD information source IMO...
http://www.delback.co.uk/lp-cdr.htm


TBH, I havn't used a record player in a while so I am not going to be able to comment on how much difference there is. If I remember quality of the pressing makes as much difference as the player.
With over 10000 discs and over 50 players, I don't agree at all!

Cheers,
David.
2Bdecided is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 15:26.