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Old 15-02-2011, 14:00
TVCriticAmy
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Which kids' books do you remember from the 70s, 80s and 90s? I'm making a list of all the books I read as a child! What were your favourites? Which do you remember best?
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Old 15-02-2011, 14:17
daftasabrush99
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i loved 'the turbulent term of tyke tiler' by gene kemp and in fact read it again just the other day
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Old 15-02-2011, 14:19
TVCriticAmy
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i loved 'the turbulent term of tyke tiler' by gene kemp and in fact read it again just the other day
Oh my goodness, thank you!! We read that in school once, I simply must buy that one!! <3 LOVED it! x
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Old 15-02-2011, 16:08
ravensborough
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R.L Stine's Goosebumps and the Point books. I used to be addicted to the Point Horror series (which was home to L.J. Smith of Vampire Diaries fame and mega-selling Celia Rees) and the Point Crime series (anyone remember Patsy Kelly by Anne Cassidy?)
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Old 15-02-2011, 16:27
Button62
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I loved The Borrowers and the Milly Molly Mandy books.

Not sure if you mean when I read them (70s) or when they were published.
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Old 15-02-2011, 20:15
TVCriticAmy
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R.L Stine's Goosebumps and the Point books. I used to be addicted to the Point Horror series (which was home to L.J. Smith of Vampire Diaries fame and mega-selling Celia Rees) and the Point Crime series (anyone remember Patsy Kelly by Anne Cassidy?)
I never did read the Goosebumps books! I know Anne Cassidy's work (my favourite author!), but now sure of that one?

I loved The Borrowers and the Milly Molly Mandy books.

Not sure if you mean when I read them (70s) or when they were published.
Either, or! I read books in the 90s that were published in the 70s <3
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Old 16-02-2011, 09:27
trinity2002
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The first book I ever read was Ninety - Nine Dragons by Barbara Sleigh. It was read to us by a teacher, and I loved it that much I made my mum buy me a copy. I think I was about 6 at the time.

Gene Kemp's books were brilliant as were the early Judy Blume's. Between the age of 11 -12 my reading material pretty much consisted entirely with Sweet Valley High and Sweet Dreams. From 13 onwards nearly all my reading was adult material.
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Old 18-02-2011, 15:16
Cythna
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THE book of my childhood was "The Other side of the Moon", by Meriol Trevor. I borrowed it from the library around my tenth birthday, and read it endless times, before my mother made me return it. Forty years on, thanks to the internet I was able to get a secondhand copy from a shop in Ohio. I still liked it, and it was amazing how well I remembered it, down to whole passages of dialogue.

The only other book that had such an impact was C S Lewis 'Till We Have Faces', which I read when I was 17. It literally changed my life.
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Old 18-02-2011, 17:32
lightdragon
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I read a lot of Judy Blume as a young teenager. Also I had entire sets of the Secret Seven and famous five.

I read Brave New World when I was about 14, that goes down as one of the books that left a mark on me.
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Old 23-02-2011, 21:55
kazzieblue
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Joan Lingards ' Across the Barricades' series. I also 're-read them a few years ago.
I also loved Uderzos' "little Nicholas " stories.
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Old 24-02-2011, 01:44
~Maria~
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i loved 'the turbulent term of tyke tiler' by gene kemp and in fact read it again just the other day
I read that in school!

One of my favourite children's books in Which Witch? by Eva Ibbotsen. Also anything by Roald Dahl.
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Old 24-02-2011, 02:22
KarmaChameleon
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I read that in school!

One of my favourite children's books in Which Witch? by Eva Ibbotsen. Also anything by Roald Dahl.
Wow. I know I read that and I know I loved it but I don't remember anything about it!
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Old 24-02-2011, 02:34
Phoenix Lazarus
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Does anyone recall a 1970s children's book about a young boy, or girl, and their grandfather or uncle, who get transported, via a telescope, onto another world, where they meet three eccentric characters with whom they have adventures? One of the three indigenous characters, I recall, was a man who dresses like a superhero, in cloak, tights, boots, metal loin-garment, helmet and skin-tight top. The character has a big 'K' on his chest, and asked what it stands for, he says, 'Kitty,' saying he is known as Captain Kitty. Another of the three indigenous characters is some sort of intelligent, bipedal, talking animal. Does it ring any bells with anyone? I recall it being read on Jackanory, about 1979, and I recall our teacher reading it to the class, about the same time.
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Old 24-02-2011, 02:42
Phoenix Lazarus
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I also recall another book from the 70s, which I enjoyed but have forgotten the name of. This was a boy with an uncle or grandad who was an inventor. In one scene, the boy and inventor travel so fast in a car the uncle invented that when they stop, after driving down a railway tunnel, a rail guard tells them they have gone back to the 1840s. They then go back to their own time by driving in reverse. There are three villains in the book, and at the end of the book, they get shrunk to a tiny size. There is a reference in the book to the inventor once having changed half the government of Britain into monkeys, accidentally, with one of his inventions, and although this is said to have been partly reversed, there is an allusion to some of the unfortunate ministers still looking a little monkey-like and eating bananas. Again, does it ring any bells anyone?
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Old 24-02-2011, 02:55
Phoenix Lazarus
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And I've just recalled yet another book, whose title I can't recall. It was set in a medieval-type fairyland, and the main character was a boy or girl who gets transported somehow from an ordinary English child's life into this strange land. I recall a dragon was quite important in the book-I think it was a good dragon, who was intelligent and who could hold conversation. I have a vague memory of the front cover showing the dragon flying through the air with several human passengers on its back. While I recall little specifics of the story, one scene sticks in my mind, when some message gets passed down a very long line, and a Chinese Whispers effect takes place, in which the phrase, 'But you don't have to, if you'd rather not: pass it on,' becomes, 'Buttered on one ear if you drove a nut: parsley scone.' Again, does this ring any bells?

And a book whose name I can remember: Alix and the Sacred Helmet, about a blond young man having adventures in a middle-eastern empire in Bronze Age times. Anyone else ever read that?
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Old 24-02-2011, 16:25
Phoenix Lazarus
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Does anyone recall a 1970s children's book about a young boy, or girl, and their grandfather or uncle, who get transported, via a telescope, onto another world, where they meet three eccentric characters with whom they have adventures? One of the three indigenous characters, I recall, was a man who dresses like a superhero, in cloak, tights, boots, metal loin-garment, helmet and skin-tight top. The character has a big 'K' on his chest, and asked what it stands for, he says, 'Kitty,' saying he is known as Captain Kitty. Another of the three indigenous characters is some sort of intelligent, bipedal, talking animal. Does it ring any bells with anyone? I recall it being read on Jackanory, about 1979, and I recall our teacher reading it to the class, about the same time.
Have just done some googling: found out this one was Rebecca's World, by Terry Nation.

And I've just recalled yet another book, whose title I can't recall. It was set in a medieval-type fairyland, and the main character was a boy or girl who gets transported somehow from an ordinary English child's life into this strange land. I recall a dragon was quite important in the book-I think it was a good dragon, who was intelligent and who could hold conversation. I have a vague memory of the front cover showing the dragon flying through the air with several human passengers on its back. While I recall little specifics of the story, one scene sticks in my mind, when some message gets passed down a very long line, and a Chinese Whispers effect takes place, in which the phrase, 'But you don't have to, if you'd rather not: pass it on,' becomes, 'Buttered on one ear if you drove a nut: parsley scone.' Again, does this ring any bells?
More googling has informed me this was, The Dragon Hoard, by Tanitha Lee.

I also recall another book from the 70s, which I enjoyed but have forgotten the name of. This was a boy with an uncle or grandad who was an inventor. In one scene, the boy and inventor travel so fast in a car the uncle invented that when they stop, after driving down a railway tunnel, a rail guard tells them they have gone back to the 1840s. They then go back to their own time by driving in reverse. There are three villains in the book, and at the end of the book, they get shrunk to a tiny size. There is a reference in the book to the inventor once having changed half the government of Britain into monkeys, accidentally, with one of his inventions, and although this is said to have been partly reversed, there is an allusion to some of the unfortunate ministers still looking a little monkey-like and eating bananas. Again, does it ring any bells anyone?
Still haven't been able to find this one out. Any help much appreciated.
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Old 24-02-2011, 19:18
bringonthewall
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My dad used to take me to the library every weekend while I was in primary school in the 90s; I must have got through nearly all the children's shelves! My favourite books were Robin Jarvis' The Whitby Witches trilogy and Goosebumps. I also loved The Secret of NIMH and Terry Pratchett's 'nomes' trilogy.

There was one particular teenagers' sci-fi/horror book that I've been trying to remember the name/author of for ages now, but no luck! It involved killer sheep; a possessed snail that moved like a compass towards the main monster at the end; and a bus, on which the two main characters' mum had died, which suddenly began reversing in time so the skeleton of a goat grew alive again etc. It's one of the most bizarre children's books I've ever read and I'd love to find it again!
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Old 25-02-2011, 14:46
KarmaChameleon
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My dad used to take me to the library every weekend while I was in primary school in the 90s; I must have got through nearly all the children's shelves! My favourite books were Robin Jarvis' The Whitby Witches trilogy and Goosebumps. I also loved The Secret of NIMH and Terry Pratchett's 'nomes' trilogy.

There was one particular teenagers' sci-fi/horror book that I've been trying to remember the name/author of for ages now, but no luck! It involved killer sheep; a possessed snail that moved like a compass towards the main monster at the end; and a bus, on which the two main characters' mum had died, which suddenly began reversing in time so the skeleton of a goat grew alive again etc. It's one of the most bizarre children's books I've ever read and I'd love to find it again!
I think I know the second one! I'm sure it was a collaboration between Paul Jennings and someone else, maybe Morris Gleitzman? I'm off to have a Google.

ETA: Okay, pretty sure it was those two with a series called Wicked! Seems to be six books but I know I read it all in one volume and there's definitely killer sheep. I'm pretty sure it's the right one, I remember the goat stuff. There's just not much info about it.
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Old 25-02-2011, 14:55
bringonthewall
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I think I know the second one! I'm sure it was a collaboration between Paul Jennings and someone else, maybe Morris Gleitzman? I'm off to have a Google.
Thank you!! With that info I've found it, it was six books in one called Wicked. I've been trying to find that for so long and there are copies for 1p on Amazon too! Made my day

edit: you got there first
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Old 25-02-2011, 15:32
Lainiomonkio
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I loved The Babysitter Club books and went on to Sweet Valley Twins and then on to Sweet Valley High. But I also loved Point Horror and Christopher Pike books.
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Old 25-02-2011, 22:34
spookyjo
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Oooh fond memories!
In Junior School when I recall starting to really enjoy reading I read and enjoyed Mrs Pepperpot (about the adventures of a woman who shrank to the size of a pepperpot, funnily enough) and 101 Dalamatians. I then read Roald Dahl books (faves were Charlie and the Chocolate factory and James and the Giant Peach) and the Enid Blyton Faraway Tree books.

Then at Senior School I read the Mallory Towers books and the other Boarding School one which I can never remember the title of *Googles* St Clares. I remember one of these books had a character called Daphne Millicent Turner. Anyway, read the Johnny Briggs books as they were on Jackanory.

Then graduated onto the Sweet Valley High books and Judy Blume books. I remember all the girls wanted to read Forever (which was slightly too adult for my then 13 years) and then Judy's first fully adult novel which I can't remember the title of either *Googles* Wifey. Was definitely too young for that!
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Old 25-02-2011, 22:44
badcompany3004
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When I was a kid I loved Usborne Puzzle Adventure Books. I had loads of them, still in the loft somewhere.

Not many people remember them, and look at me confused but I loved them.
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Old 25-02-2011, 23:07
Phoenix Lazarus
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Fantastic Mr Fox, anyone? First Roald Dahl I ever read. Boggis, Bunce and Bean were a marvellous trio of grotesque villains!
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Old 27-02-2011, 00:05
KarmaChameleon
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Thank you!! With that info I've found it, it was six books in one called Wicked. I've been trying to find that for so long and there are copies for 1p on Amazon too! Made my day

edit: you got there first
Haha, glad to help. Might pick it up myself for that price.
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Old 27-02-2011, 00:30
Charcole911
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Mr Dahl's James and the giant peach. Also a book called Raptor red
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