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The HARRY POTTER Books


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Old 16-04-2013, 20:44
Addisonian
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Well each to their own,as they say.I read them
all aloud to grandchildren and found them to be
tedious,badly written,badly plotted and with one
dimensional characters.
But they sold squillions,so what do I know?
Oh come on! Wasn't there anything you enjoyed about them?
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Old 16-04-2013, 21:27
lordOfTime
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One-dimensional?
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Old 16-04-2013, 21:32
Phoenix Lazarus
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Well each to their own,as they say.I read them
all aloud to grandchildren and found them to be
tedious,badly written,badly plotted and with one
dimensional characters
.
What about Snape, Dumbledore-and even Peter Pettigrew/Wormtail?
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Old 24-04-2013, 19:38
lordOfTime
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Ginny Weasley who was affected by being possessed by Tom Riddle's Diary, and Neville Longbottom who was so very nearly the the kind of hero Harry was and of course who's parents were tortured to insanity by Voldemort.
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Old 21-08-2013, 13:46
Beady Eye 2013
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Think I may read these again before the year is out. Amazing books and I think it is odd when people analyse every last sentence she wrote, just sit back, read and ignore.
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Old 22-08-2013, 00:11
loracan
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I read the first four to both my children (at different times) they are an absolute dream for reading aloud.
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Old 22-08-2013, 05:59
David Waine
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Well each to their own,as they say.I read them
all aloud to grandchildren and found them to be
tedious,badly written,badly plotted and with one
dimensional characters.
But they sold squillions,so what do I know?
There is a sad British tradition of knocking anyone who is successful. It is something that our cousins across the Atlantic do not suffer from. They celebrate success, but it rather embarrasses us. I distinctly remember how ashamed of being British I felt during our run of gold medals in last year's Olympics. Well actually, no I don't. I am as proud of our athletes as anyone. I am equally proud to be part of the nation that spawned J.K. Rowling who, virtually single-handedly, got an entire generation of youngsters reading again.

I have read them all several times each, so I know them pretty well. Tedious? No, they are not. There is far too much action in all of them, coupled with moments of genuine pathos, for them to be tedious.

Badly written? They vary, but their strengths outweigh their weakness by miles. 'Order of the Phoenix' is the weakest book in my opinion, being about half as long again as it has any real need to be. I think she was a victim of her own success in that she had to keep a huge and impatient audience supplied with new Harry Potter books as quickly as possible. This led to the later books (which are also the longest, of course) being written as fast as she physically could. Working under that sort of pressure, it is some achievement that they are as good as they are - and at their best, they are very good indeed. Overall, there isn't anything wrong with any of them that a good re-edit couldn't put right, but I don't suppose that will ever happen. Why should she?

Badly plotted? Can you justify that? Rowling is unusual in that she allows her characters to age between books. Alexandre Dumas did a similar thing with his 'Three Musketeers' novels, but not on this sort of scale. The first two books are very much for children. 'Prisoner of Azkaban' forms a sort of crossing point. After that, they get progressively darker and gloomier, culminating in 'Deathly Hallows', which is well on the way to becoming a horror story' (in the classic sense, that is, which sees Voldemort as a sort of modern day Dracula figure). All this without losing sight of the series' core concepts. Bad plotting? I don't think so.

One-dimensional characters? Really? A hero with a genuine dark side. Harry isn't above using an unforgivable curse on occasion - and he has a very short fuse, a legacy of the horrors of his infancy. There again, he is capable of intense love and self-sacrifice. What is one-dimensional about that? How about Hermione's and Ron's love - hate relationship? What about Snape? The last book is almost into its final pages before we discover whose side he is really on.

All in all, I think you answered your own question.
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Old 22-08-2013, 10:12
KatieLuLu2
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Think I may read these again before the year is out. Amazing books and I think it is odd when people analyse every last sentence she wrote, just sit back, read and ignore.
I agree with you that people over analyze every sentence. As far as I'm concerned the characters are not one dimensional, I could see the different facets of their personalities and the characters were "human" and not some perfect, god-like creature
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Old 22-08-2013, 11:34
Beady Eye 2013
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I read the first four to both my children (at different times) they are an absolute dream for reading aloud.
I am sure they would have preferred Stephan Fry

I agree with you that people over analyze every sentence. As far as I'm concerned the characters are not one dimensional, I could see the different facets of their personalities and the characters were "human" and not some perfect, god-like creature
I think we are correct!

There is a sad British tradition of knocking anyone who is successful. It is something that our cousins across the Atlantic do not suffer from. They celebrate success, but it rather embarrasses us. I distinctly remember how ashamed of being British I felt during our run of gold medals in last year's Olympics. Well actually, no I don't. I am as proud of our athletes as anyone. I am equally proud to be part of the nation that spawned J.K. Rowling who, virtually single-handedly, got an entire generation of youngsters reading again.

I have read them all several times each, so I know them pretty well. Tedious? No, they are not. There is far too much action in all of them, coupled with moments of genuine pathos, for them to be tedious.

Badly written? They vary, but their strengths outweigh their weakness by miles. 'Order of the Phoenix' is the weakest book in my opinion, being about half as long again as it has any real need to be. I think she was a victim of her own success in that she had to keep a huge and impatient audience supplied with new Harry Potter books as quickly as possible. This led to the later books (which are also the longest, of course) being written as fast as she physically could. Working under that sort of pressure, it is some achievement that they are as good as they are - and at their best, they are very good indeed. Overall, there isn't anything wrong with any of them that a good re-edit couldn't put right, but I don't suppose that will ever happen. Why should she?

Badly plotted? Can you justify that? Rowling is unusual in that she allows her characters to age between books. Alexandre Dumas did a similar thing with his 'Three Musketeers' novels, but not on this sort of scale. The first two books are very much for children. 'Prisoner of Azkaban' forms a sort of crossing point. After that, they get progressively darker and gloomier, culminating in 'Deathly Hallows', which is well on the way to becoming a horror story' (in the classic sense, that is, which sees Voldemort as a sort of modern day Dracula figure). All this without losing sight of the series' core concepts. Bad plotting? I don't think so.

One-dimensional characters? Really? A hero with a genuine dark side. Harry isn't above using an unforgivable curse on occasion - and he has a very short fuse, a legacy of the horrors of his infancy. There again, he is capable of intense love and self-sacrifice. What is one-dimensional about that? How about Hermione's and Ron's love - hate relationship? What about Snape? The last book is almost into its final pages before we discover whose side he is really on.

All in all, I think you answered your own question.
A well thought out and beautifully written response. Loved reading this post
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Old 25-06-2015, 00:36
Todd Grimshaw
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DS just did a Pottermore update article!

J.K Rowling revealed why the Dursley disliked Harry Potter so much plus why she choose the name Vernon Dursley and Petunia Dursley.

James Potter really was an ass at times...
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Old 25-06-2015, 01:11
Nickelback
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I like them.... my brother leant me his audio cd's narrated by Stephen fry last year, I was blown away with it all, it showed me how talented Stephen fry is, he is amazing, and so got me hooked!!!!!......
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Old 08-07-2015, 22:02
Everlasting
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Does anyone know which store is better to get the complete harry potter bookset WHSmiths or waterstones, because im currently watching all the harry potter's on itv and ive refound my love for harry potter.
It's reminding me of my good childhood times playing outside with twigs betending to be harry potter, and the seriously long waits for the films which i use to get over excited over. I read the first three books as a child and i remember them being really good, but once i got to the fourth book it became to big a book for me to read at that age i think i got halfway but then it became to much but i remember it being good.
But now im older and i will be able to read all of them so i want to read them, my mum did have the whole collection of books, but because she lent them out so many times we have lost the first two books and there all look really old looking now (not that it bothers me) but i want my own collection which i could lend out in the future, and let my future children read them.
So if i could know which store is best by tommorow is good ive got 60 pound in total i think to buy all of them. Thanks
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Old 09-07-2015, 10:12
Granny McSmith
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I'd say Waterstones because it sells just books, and is more likely to have the books in than W H Smith's, which sells lots of things and usually only has more recent books on the shelves.

Any bookshop will be able to order the books for you, though, and they get them very quickly. Perhaps it would be a good idea to phone first to avoid being disappointed if the books aren't in stock. You could ask the price if you phone, too.

I hope you enjoy the last 4 books. They take a while to read, but they are worth it. There's much, much more in them than in the films. I love them, and I'm a Granny.
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Old 09-07-2015, 16:07
Everlasting
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I'd say Waterstones because it sells just books, and is more likely to have the books in than W H Smith's, which sells lots of things and usually only has more recent books on the shelves.

Any bookshop will be able to order the books for you, though, and they get them very quickly. Perhaps it would be a good idea to phone first to avoid being disappointed if the books aren't in stock. You could ask the price if you phone, too.

I hope you enjoy the last 4 books. They take a while to read, but they are worth it. There's much, much more in them than in the films. I love them, and I'm a Granny.
Thanks i will go waterstones on tuesday they should have all the books hopefully as harry potter is so popular, im currently having withdrawal symptoms because there hasnt been a film out in years. Im hoping jk rowling writes one final book on harry's last year at hogwarts (i know she said she wont write another book but i think she has got it in her and definately misses writing them as she's currently doing a play "harry potter and the cursed child") we could have harry fighting off the last of the death eaters and them trying to get there hands on the deathly hallows to bring voldemort back. Anyway hopefully ill have all the books by tuesday, if she does write another book im going to go at midnight to get it as my mum told me how exciting it was for her getting deathly hallows at midnight, and the line reached all the way through the shop and all the way down the road, i would also see the film in cinema as i never saw any at cinema and i reckon it would be fantastic but unfortinately all of this is unlikely to happen but i can hope. Thanks alot i might come here and write a review when I've finished reading them, I'm planning on reading the first book then watch the first film and so on.
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Old 09-07-2015, 16:12
wampa1
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I like them.... my brother leant me his audio cd's narrated by Stephen fry last year, I was blown away with it all, it showed me how talented Stephen fry is, he is amazing, and so got me hooked!!!!!......
The Stephen Fry audiobooks were the only way I could stomach digesting then. They really are terribly written novels, full of ideas and heart, granted, but the prose is appalling.
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Old 09-07-2015, 16:34
Granny McSmith
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Thanks i will go waterstones on tuesday they should have all the books hopefully as harry potter is so popular, im currently having withdrawal symptoms because there hasnt been a film out in years. Im hoping jk rowling writes one final book on harry's last year at hogwarts (i know she said she wont write another book but i think she has got it in her and definately misses writing them as she's currently doing a play "harry potter and the cursed child") we could have harry fighting off the last of the death eaters and them trying to get there hands on the deathly hallows to bring voldemort back. Anyway hopefully ill have all the books by tuesday, if she does write another book im going to go at midnight to get it as my mum told me how exciting it was for her getting deathly hallows at midnight, and the line reached all the way through the shop and all the way down the road, i would also see the film in cinema as i never saw any at cinema and i reckon it would be fantastic but unfortinately all of this is unlikely to happen but i can hope. Thanks alot i might come here and write a review when I've finished reading them, I'm planning on reading the first book then watch the first film and so on.
They are soon going to be filming "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" which should be good fun - it's due for release next year, I think.

Are you on Pottermore? It's free to join and JKR sometimes writes short stories about her characters on there. Just Google "Pottermore".

She's mainly writing more adult books now, with her Cormoran Strike series, about a private investigator.

Enjoy your reading.
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Old 09-07-2015, 16:37
Granny McSmith
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The Stephen Fry audiobooks were the only way I could stomach digesting then. They really are terribly written novels, full of ideas and heart, granted, but the prose is appalling.
They are full of ideas and heart, I agree, and very funny, too. At least I thought so, but I like adolescent humour.

Not brilliant as literature, but who cares if you're having fun?
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Old 09-07-2015, 16:39
wampa1
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They are full of ideas and heart, I agree, and very funny, too. At least I thought so, but I like adolescent humour.

Not brilliant as literature, but who cares if you're having fun?
Well, that's it exactly. I found them difficult to read because it literally felt as though I was reading the Mr. Men or something for toddlers. You get Stephen Fry on board though and I'm in. I'd listen to him reading the phone book.
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Old 09-07-2015, 17:27
Granny McSmith
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Well, that's it exactly. I found them difficult to read because it literally felt as though I was reading the Mr. Men or something for toddlers. You get Stephen Fry on board though and I'm in. I'd listen to him reading the phone book.
The first 2 or 3 books are indeed written for the capacity of young children, but I have a high tolerance for that sort of stuff. I found the later ones more adult, or at least young adult.

I can't stand disembodied voices telling me things (even Fry); that's why I don't listen to radio. I like it to be all going on in my own head. and doing my own mental voices.
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Old 10-07-2015, 21:33
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I disagree about them being poorly-written. I love the flow of Jo's writing, and the way she gave her world more and more life as time went on. They're a joy to read!

Philosopher's Stone has to be one of the best children's books ever written. I look at it in a totally different light these days, obviously. I find myself analysing each paragraph and trying to work out just where it turns from what could have been a basic idea that didn't really go anywhere to something colossal!

In fact, it's there from word 'go'. The fun, the intrigue, the hope for Harry. It should be standard reading for all, even if people feel it's too 'kiddie' for them.
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Old 11-07-2015, 10:59
Granny McSmith
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I disagree about them being poorly-written. I love the flow of Jo's writing, and the way she gave her world more and more life as time went on. They're a joy to read!

Philosopher's Stone has to be one of the best children's books ever written. I look at it in a totally different light these days, obviously. I find myself analysing each paragraph and trying to work out just where it turns from what could have been a basic idea that didn't really go anywhere to something colossal!

In fact, it's there from word 'go'. The fun, the intrigue, the hope for Harry. It should be standard reading for all, even if people feel it's too 'kiddie' for them.
There's a lot of clever stuff in The Philosopher's Stone. The alchemicical references (Albus; Rubus: Black). The 3-headed dog acquired from "a Greek" (a reference lost in the film, for some reason). The way Snape's first words to Harry are a sort of code for Snape's whole backstory.

You only see these things looking back. That's why I get a bit miffed when people dismiss HP as just little magic tales for kids, or say they're derivative. All stuff I said until I actually read them (under duress, then was sorry I hadn't read them earlier!)

And that prophecy, and the way it's worked out! I still marvel at it.
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Old 21-07-2015, 18:45
Karis
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I'll be in the minority but I VASTLY prefer the Jim Dale audiobooks. He narrates them so well.

But he hasn't a clue how to pronounce certain words in the first few books and it's annoying when he says "griffinda" (Gryffindor) and "voldemorr" (don't make me say it).

But those things aside, absolutely excellent!
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