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Old 01-06-2011, 19:43
plymgary
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Hello,

My mum and dad have recently split up after 30 years of marriage and it looks like my mum, who is 65, will be coming out of it with around 50k.

Now, she did mention going into sheltered accommodation but then we had the idea that she might prefer living in a static caravan?

Is it possible to live in one of these year round and, would 30k get a good one?

She wants to come down to Devon so if anybody knows where we could start looking in that area then, great.

Many thanks,

Gary
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Old 01-06-2011, 19:49
Pepperoni Man
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Yep -it is possible to live in a static mobile home all year round. You need to choose your site carefully and check the cost of ground rent etc

Can't help on cost though
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Old 01-06-2011, 19:50
Red Whine
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Plymgary, a static caravan will usually be classed as a holiday home, and is not meant to be occupied all year round.
What your mum needs to be looking for is a park home.
Try http://seekers who are estate egents who specialise in selling park homes, they have homes from all over the country on their website.

There is a world of difference between a park home and a static caravan, and without being rude to you, you need to do some investigation and make sure what it is your mum is looking for.

There are several good magazines on the market that will give her a lot of information.
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Old 01-06-2011, 19:51
indianwells
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30k will get a nice static with C/Heating, D/glazed etc and perfectly livable year round. The problem is where it is going to be sited. The holiday parks don't have a year round licence. For that it will be a residential park and they attract yearly ground rent fees which can be quite high. If she knows someone who will let her site it on their land then that would be the best (and cheapest) option.
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Old 01-06-2011, 19:58
Tassium
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I think there are few protections in law for residential parks, so best be careful.

And might not be as cheap as you think.

I think a person can live in a static caravan on a holiday site for 10 months of the year so maybe a person could do that and stay in a B&B for the other two/three. I'm sure a good deal could be had in the winter months at a holiday region like Skegness or whatever.

But I've never done it myself.
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Old 01-06-2011, 20:07
Red Whine
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If you live in a static van on a holiday site, you have no rights at all, you are unable to register to vote, or register with a doctor, as the vans are not considered to be permanent homes, which park homes on a licensed residential site are.

There are protections out there for people who live on bona fide residential park home sites.
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Old 01-06-2011, 20:29
cultureman
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If you live in a static van on a holiday site, you have no rights at all, you are unable to register to vote, or register with a doctor, as the vans are not considered to be permanent homes, which park homes on a licensed residential site are.

There are protections out there for people who live on bona fide residential park home sites.
A brief search on the 'net suggests neither of those claims are true.
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Old 01-06-2011, 20:49
woodbush
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Might be better to ask this question on this site, Go Static.
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Old 01-06-2011, 20:52
woodbush
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I think there are few protections in law for residential parks, so best be careful.

And might not be as cheap as you think.

I think a person can live in a static caravan on a holiday site for 10 months of the year so maybe a person could do that and stay in a B&B for the other two/three. I'm sure a good deal could be had in the winter months at a holiday region like Skegness or whatever.

But I've never done it myself.
My brother does this on a site with an 11 month licence.

You still need a permanent UK address, he uses my other brothers.
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Old 01-06-2011, 20:58
Tassium
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Also a residential park seems like a bit of a commitment.

If I were so inclined to live this way I think I would definately try it out first on a holiday park for 10 months and B&B for the remainder just to experience the day-in day-out caravan thing.
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Old 01-06-2011, 23:04
SnrDev
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A couple of years ago there were stories doing the rounds on progs like Watchdog, You & Yours etc about the problems of buying static vans. The gist of it was that you have to buy and sell through the site owner, who obviously buys low & sells high. In some cases vans older than a certain age had to be sold 'to keep standards consistent'. For standards read 'site owners bank account'. It may all be a lot nicer now but this was a common experience. A good friend of mine went through it.

Quick add. A lot of people who do live on these sites for 10 months swan off to Spain, Malta, Portugal etc for two months over the winter. There are a lot of amazingly cheap deals for pensioners going out for more than a fortnight, and it gets you round the site limitations.
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Old 01-06-2011, 23:28
Joni M
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Our site allows us to stay 11 months and costs 2K per annum ground rent. Those that live here just go on a cheap holiday during February or stay with family and friends.

We can keep the van as long as we wish to on the site, but can't sell it on as it's now 20 yrs old.

Many sites only allow vans up to 10 yrs old. I would resist paying 30K if possible, ours was just 3K and we've just sold our 'newer' one for 4.5K, it will easy last another 10 years.

You CAN register with a Dr and sign on and also get car insurance etc.
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Old 02-06-2011, 08:52
Red Whine
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If you live in a static van on a holiday site, you have no rights at all, you are unable to register to vote, or register with a doctor, as the vans are not considered to be permanent homes, which park homes on a licensed residential site are.

There are protections out there for people who live on bona fide residential park home sites.
I apologise if this information is wrong, but I'm sure it's what I read when I was looking for a park home a few years ago.
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Old 02-06-2011, 12:26
Hotgossip
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Our site allows us to stay 11 months and costs 2K per annum ground rent. Those that live here just go on a cheap holiday during February or stay with family and friends.

We can keep the van as long as we wish to on the site, but can't sell it on as it's now 20 yrs old.

Many sites only allow vans up to 10 yrs old. I would resist paying 30K if possible, ours was just 3K and we've just sold our 'newer' one for 4.5K, it will easy last another 10 years.

You CAN register with a Dr and sign on and also get car insurance etc.
That sounds like the set-up where my friend's Mum lives. She's been there for years and her "van" is beautiful. Every home comfort and hardly any maintenance. She takes a winter break usually but has also spent time with both of her daughters.

Most of these sites are for over 55's I think aren't they?
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Old 02-06-2011, 13:42
MrYogiKarma
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Going into sheltered accommodation at 65!!!!!!!!

Seriously

My Mum is that age and still works by her own choice.
Call her old and even mention the words sheltered accommodation will leave you with a couple of black eyes.
She acts and looks like a 50 year old, full of energy and life.

Sheltered housing is in my opinion for the elderly who need help.

A static home sounds great but why doesn't she just rent somewhere?
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Old 02-06-2011, 18:01
plymgary
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Thanks for the advice everyone.

My mum has never been one to help herself and it was my dad that left even though she should have sorted that years ago. That's another story though!!!

That's probably why she wants the sheltered accommodation option....you know, poor defenceless woman that can't stand on her own.

We'll have a look at some of the park home options.

Thanks for the advice everyone.

Oh, and sorry if I sound like a brat. I'm really not...just had it up to the neck with my mum really but wouldn't be right to dessert her.
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Old 02-06-2011, 18:14
stud u like
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Going into sheltered accommodation at 65!!!!!!!!

Seriously

My Mum is that age and still works by her own choice.
Call her old and even mention the words sheltered accommodation will leave you with a couple of black eyes.
She acts and looks like a 50 year old, full of energy and life.

Sheltered housing is in my opinion for the elderly who need help.

A static home sounds great but why doesn't she just rent somewhere?
I know a few people in sheletered housing. They are very agile. They like it for the community spirit and the events calendar.
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Old 02-06-2011, 21:20
AnywhereButHome
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They can be really cold at night and in winter, I don't know what centrally heated ones are like though.
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Old 02-06-2011, 23:39
Joni M
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I apologise if this information is wrong, but I'm sure it's what I read when I was looking for a park home a few years ago.
Aw, don't worry, there are lots of myths around, a lot of people don't know their rights and they virtually live on these sites You may even be right, I don't know about park homes.
That sounds like the set-up where my friend's Mum lives. She's been there for years and her "van" is beautiful. Every home comfort and hardly any maintenance. She takes a winter break usually but has also spent time with both of her daughters.

Most of these sites are for over 55's I think aren't they?
The average age on ours is around 40, quite a few single people too and they all look out for each other.
Thanks for the advice everyone.

My mum has never been one to help herself and it was my dad that left even though she should have sorted that years ago. That's another story though!!!

That's probably why she wants the sheltered accommodation option....you know, poor defenceless woman that can't stand on her own.

We'll have a look at some of the park home options.

Thanks for the advice everyone.

Oh, and sorry if I sound like a brat. I'm really not...just had it up to the neck with my mum really but wouldn't be right to dessert her.
You didn't sound like a brat you daft bugger
They can be really cold at night and in winter, I don't know what centrally heated ones are like though.
Bloomin' freezing!!! BUT cos ours is small (28" by 10") it warms up very quickly.
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Old 03-06-2011, 01:28
Bulletguy1
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Hello,

My mum and dad have recently split up after 30 years of marriage and it looks like my mum, who is 65, will be coming out of it with around 50k.

Now, she did mention going into sheltered accommodation but then we had the idea that she might prefer living in a static caravan?

Is it possible to live in one of these year round and, would 30k get a good one?

She wants to come down to Devon so if anybody knows where we could start looking in that area then, great.
You need to be looking at websites specifically for what are known as Park Homes which are for year round residential living. Many sites with static vans are not licenced for year round accommodation.

Here is one to start with but just google Park Homes for any more.

http://www.swparkhomes.com/
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Old 03-06-2011, 08:11
alfiewozere
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Thanks for the advice everyone.

My mum has never been one to help herself and it was my dad that left even though she should have sorted that years ago. That's another story though!!!

That's probably why she wants the sheltered accommodation option....you know, poor defenceless woman that can't stand on her own.

We'll have a look at some of the park home options.

Thanks for the advice everyone.

Oh, and sorry if I sound like a brat. I'm really not...just had it up to the neck with my mum really but wouldn't be right to dessert her.
You don't sound like a brat at all - but you do need to convince your mum, that at 65, her life isn't a slow shuffle to the grave now - she could have 20+ years of active, fun-filled life. She may have had a shitty time, but 65 is no age to throw in the towel.
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Old 03-06-2011, 20:53
plymgary
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You don't sound like a brat at all - but you do need to convince your mum, that at 65, her life isn't a slow shuffle to the grave now - she could have 20+ years of active, fun-filled life. She may have had a shitty time, but 65 is no age to throw in the towel.
Thanks. But, she's had that view on life since she was in her 40's. One of life's self-inflicted victims.

I'll offer advice and help but I refuse to get too wrapped-up in it all.
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Old 16-01-2013, 22:11
chris1978
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My Mum and stepdad lived in a static van for 7 years near Weston Super Mare. It was on a nice park and they liked it. They sold their house and bought a new van which was really nice inside. They had central heating and even a washing machine. It was a cosy little place and really nice in the summer as it was a short walk to the beach, I used to enjoy going there!

There were a few downsides though. The first was despite having central heating, in the depths of winter the van lost heat very quickly. Going to the loo in the night was freezing, and even in the summer it could be cold at night. I wouldn't envy them being in the van in weather like we are having this week.

The site where they were on did not have a full year round licence, so they had to leave for the entire month of February. Which was a bit of a pain. They used to book a holiday cottage for a month and stay there. A lot of people used to go to Spain for a month where the weather was warmer. Also you couldn't vote and some mail order companies would not deliver to the site as it was not a "recognised address".

However it's worth looking at the pros and cons as I thought it was a really nice way to live, for very little outlay. No huge mortgage or council tax bills.

Both of them now rent a flat through age UK now as my mum was ill for a while and found the lack of heat wasn't good for getting better. They had a nice few years though.
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Old 16-01-2013, 23:21
jazzyjazzy
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We have friends who live in sheltered accommodation and it cost them a fortune - it was about 175,000 to get onto the complex in the first place and they pay about 100 a week for ammenities as well as council tax.
They do own their property, along with the people who run the complex, but there are all sorts of rules and regs regarding selling etc.
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Old 17-01-2013, 07:52
grumpyscot
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A couple of years ago there were stories doing the rounds on progs like Watchdog, You & Yours etc about the problems of buying static vans. The gist of it was that you have to buy and sell through the site owner, who obviously buys low & sells high. In some cases vans older than a certain age had to be sold 'to keep standards consistent'..
Totally endorse this. The exact experience of friends of ours.
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