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Old 06-02-2013, 23:09
kochspostulates
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Could you be a brain surgeon?
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Old 06-02-2013, 23:26
fleet
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I saw it earlier, I found it upsetting, but hopeful at the same time.
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Old 07-02-2013, 00:54
Christa Ellen
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What an amazing programme, watched it with a lump in my throat. Poor Tracey and the Chinese lady, but glad Martin came round and the little girl had her shunt removed.

Very moving. I see what you mean fleet, the programme pulls your emotions in every direction.
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Old 07-02-2013, 00:59
Supratad
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These surgeons do big themselves up. Its hardly rocket science, is it?
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Old 07-02-2013, 09:35
PinkPetunia
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These surgeons do big themselves up. Its hardly rocket science, is it?
Its far more important and you need a very special talent to be a neurosurgeon .Rocket science we can all live without , a functioning brain is far more useful .
I am guessing you are trying to be funny but thought I would set you straight anyway
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Old 07-02-2013, 14:14
2005CLAIRE
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Would love to know how Tracey the midwife got on.

Excellent programme.
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Old 07-02-2013, 17:00
mrsdaisychain
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Amazing programme, amazing doctors and surgeons.
Watched a similar programme the other night and last week, Brain hospital based at the Walton Centre in Liverpool. Think that is a channel five programme on a tuesday night.

It was lovely to follow the patients and see their recovery, that is a special insight. I too would love to know how Tracy got on.
I really felt for the chinese couple, the husband was so overcome.

The poor little girl who had bad headaches, that was very moving but so pleased they sorted her.

It makes you so thankful for what you have watching these programmes.
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Old 07-02-2013, 17:08
Christa Ellen
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Amazing programme, amazing doctors and surgeons.
Watched a similar programme the other night and last week,
Brain hospital based at the Walton Centre in Liverpool. Think that is a channel five programme on a tuesday night.

It was lovely to follow the patients and see their recovery, that is a special insight. I too would love to know how Tracy got on.
I really felt for the chinese couple, the husband was so overcome.

The poor little girl who had bad headaches, that was very moving but so pleased they sorted her.

It makes you so thankful for what you have watching these programmes.
I watched these as well, anyone that liked the Brain Doctor would find these fascinating and moving too.
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Old 07-02-2013, 19:13
kochspostulates
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I've never met anyone who has thought ''ooo I could really do with a rocket scientist right now''.

But I guess we all know people who have been in car accidents or stuff like that.

Not saying that rocket science isn't important looking at the big picture, but its less important to our immediate friends and family etc.
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Old 07-02-2013, 19:18
Stansfield
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What an amazing programme, watched it with a lump in my throat. Poor Tracey and the Chinese lady, but glad Martin came round and the little girl had her shunt removed.

Very moving. I see what you mean fleet, the programme pulls your emotions in every direction.
Amazed by his recovery.

Fascinating programme....but I would have liked to have seen more of the operations.
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Old 07-02-2013, 19:19
Mark F
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EDIT: Been talked about by "mrsdaisychain"

Quite sad this week because one died and the other suffered a relapse it seems after having electrons implanted into his brain to control tremors...
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Old 07-02-2013, 22:38
Supratad
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Its far more important and you need a very special talent to be a neurosurgeon .Rocket science we can all live without , a functioning brain is far more useful .
I am guessing you are trying to be funny but thought I would set you straight anyway
You know you have failed when you see that.
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Old 07-02-2013, 22:57
Christa Ellen
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EDIT: Been talked about by "mrsdaisychain"

Quite sad this week because one died and the other suffered a relapse it seems after having electrons implanted into his brain to control tremors...
I was in tears watching this, poor man, and his family.

I hope the other man can have the electrodes implanted again, they made such a difference.
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Old 07-02-2013, 23:59
Shoes on
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Jury is out for me at the min on the BBC programme. I watched because I was told it was going to feature a girl with a condition called Chiari Malformation. I had surgery for the same condition 3 years ago. The programme featured a girl with 'a lump between her head & her neck'. I almost missed what was going on until the Neurosurgeon cut her neck (I've got a very small, neat scar but it's from my neck to that sticking out bit half-way up the skull) & began to remove the cerebellar tonsils. This condition is quite common but not at all well known. If they were going to bother featuring it they could have gone a long way towards educating people about it. What was said was misleading to say the least. That said, it was interesting to see how stuff (sorry) affects the medics & I loved their sense of humour & also respected the stifled tears of the lady on the ward.

I've also been watching Brain Hospital on C5. In my opinion. it's a far better programme. It seems to explain conditions far better. The BBC one just strikes me as being a bit 'reality TV' rather than documentary.

My 1st ever post on Digital Spy even though I've been registered for ages. I'm just very disappointed that the BBC missed an awareness-raising chance in this programme but to be fair they probably didn't even realise they were missing a chance.
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Old 08-02-2013, 09:29
PinkPetunia
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Jury is out for me at the min on the BBC programme. I watched because I was told it was going to feature a girl with a condition called Chiari Malformation. I had surgery for the same condition 3 years ago. The programme featured a girl with 'a lump between her head & her neck'. I almost missed what was going on until the Neurosurgeon cut her neck (I've got a very small, neat scar but it's from my neck to that sticking out bit half-way up the skull) & began to remove the cerebellar tonsils. This condition is quite common but not at all well known. If they were going to bother featuring it they could have gone a long way towards educating people about it. What was said was misleading to say the least. That said, it was interesting to see how stuff (sorry) affects the medics & I loved their sense of humour & also respected the stifled tears of the lady on the ward.

I've also been watching Brain Hospital on C5. In my opinion. it's a far better programme. It seems to explain conditions far better. The BBC one just strikes me as being a bit 'reality TV' rather than documentary.

My 1st ever post on Digital Spy even though I've been registered for ages. I'm just very disappointed that the BBC missed an awareness-raising chance in this programme but to be fair they probably didn't even realise they were missing a chance.
Funnily enough having watched it I was left wondering what was wrong with that girl and wondering if it was Chiari Malformation as I was interested .I have nursed kids post Chiari and thought they really didnt explain it well at all
I also was puzzled at what "disease " Martin had as they never named it and I was interested in that too.I am naturally curious !

Also does anyone know where we have seen the lovely consultant Jay before .I know I have seen him and wondered if it was on the Great Ormand Street programmes a few years ago
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Old 08-02-2013, 09:35
Christa Ellen
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Jury is out for me at the min on the BBC programme. I watched because I was told it was going to feature a girl with a condition called Chiari Malformation. I had surgery for the same condition 3 years ago. The programme featured a girl with 'a lump between her head & her neck'. I almost missed what was going on until the Neurosurgeon cut her neck (I've got a very small, neat scar but it's from my neck to that sticking out bit half-way up the skull) & began to remove the cerebellar tonsils. This condition is quite common but not at all well known. If they were going to bother featuring it they could have gone a long way towards educating people about it. What was said was misleading to say the least. That said, it was interesting to see how stuff (sorry) affects the medics & I loved their sense of humour & also respected the stifled tears of the lady on the ward.

I've also been watching Brain Hospital on C5. In my opinion. it's a far better programme. It seems to explain conditions far better. The BBC one just strikes me as being a bit 'reality TV' rather than documentary.

My 1st ever post on Digital Spy even though I've been registered for ages. I'm just very disappointed that the BBC missed an awareness-raising chance in this programme but to be fair they probably didn't even realise they were missing a chance.
I preferred the Channel 5 programme, it seemed to focus on the patients more.
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Old 08-02-2013, 18:20
Jess Rabbit
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These surgeons do big themselves up. Its hardly rocket science, is it?
You know you have failed when you see that.
well, i thought it was funny!....
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Old 08-02-2013, 18:31
Supratad
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well, i thought it was funny!....
Thanks, but to probably mis-quote Stewart Lee "There's nothing worse than one person clapping, It suggests what you are doing has some artistic merit, but no commercial value"
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Old 08-02-2013, 19:41
PinkPetunia
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Thanks, but to probably mis-quote Stewart Lee "There's nothing worse than one person clapping, It suggests what you are doing has some artistic merit, but no commercial value"
Or as the old proverb says " there is a time and place for everything "
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Old 09-02-2013, 00:02
Jess Rabbit
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Thanks, but to probably mis-quote Stewart Lee "There's nothing worse than one person clapping, It suggests what you are doing has some artistic merit, but no commercial value"
or perhaps it suggest that I'm the only one who has enough of a sense of humour to take your joke as it was intended?....
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Old 09-02-2013, 00:16
McColl
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I recorded this programme and just watched it - very interesting.
I too would have liked to know what the condition was to cause Martins problems, and at least a brief update on Tracey.

My main negative about this programme was regarding Tracey: we saw the Sister talking in a very negative manner about her prognosis right in front of her.
Surely it's long been known that one should never say negative things within earshot of a comatose patient?

One of my relatives was deeply unconscious, but the nurse in intensive care gently told him everything she was about to do knowing there was a chance she could be heard.
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Old 09-02-2013, 06:58
Christa Ellen
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I recorded this programme and just watched it - very interesting.
I too would have liked to know what the condition was to cause Martins problems, and at least a brief update on Tracey.

My main negative about this programme was regarding Tracey: we saw the Sister talking in a very negative manner about her prognosis right in front of her.
Surely it's long been known that one should never say negative things within earshot of a comatose patient?

One of my relatives was deeply unconscious, but the nurse in intensive care gently told him everything she was about to do knowing there was a chance she could be heard.
I didn't like that either. The other man who was in a coma said he could remember his wife speaking to him when he had appeared unresponsive.

I would not want to take the risk the patient may be able to hear.
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Old 09-02-2013, 07:29
mrsdaisychain
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I too thought comments should not be made near or around the patients bed. Martin said he could hear his wife talking to him but he could show no response.
That said, Tracy may still be able to hear but not commumicate with anyone. It must be terrifying if that is the case.
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Old 09-02-2013, 12:31
McColl
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I didn't like that either. The other man who was in a coma said he could remember his wife speaking to him when he had appeared unresponsive.

I would not want to take the risk the patient may be able to hear.
When our relative was in intensive care (neurosurgery) the nurse explained that they always talk to the patient based on the assumption that they can hear.

We actually experienced another close relative in a coma respond with a very definite squeeze of the hand after laying totally silent and still all day. It was a goodbye as it turned out, but proved that hearing was functioning even at that stage.

There had been cases where long term coma patients have had frightening experiences which they related on recovery - hece the reason for both careful talk and interaction with the patient being essential.
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Old 13-02-2013, 22:06
turquoiseblue
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These surgeons do big themselves up. Its hardly rocket science, is it?
We're really enjoying these programmes. These surgeons are amazing. That guy Jay is very charismatic!
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