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Headphone amp advice required please


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Old 07-01-2012, 16:58
Clank007
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Due to ongoing issues with noisy neighbours I have been looking at a headphone solution for my LG Lcd TV.

I'm looking to buy a headphone amp and connect these noise cancelling headphones to them.

This headphone amplifier says to connect it by phono leads to an existing amplifier, but I dont own one.

My question is could I plug this into the optical out audio socket on the back of the TV, and then plug the headphone amp into it, and then the headphones into the headphone amp do you think?

Any advice gratefully recieved.
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Old 07-01-2012, 17:19
chrisjr
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That adapter is useless for what you require. It just converts between two different forms of optical connector. It does not do any digital to analogue conversion which would be needed to connect your headphones.

I am assuming that you have confirmed that the TV does not have either a headphone socket or analogue audio outputs of it's own? If it's anything like my LG telly then it probably doesn't. However at least SCART 1 is wired for output as well.

So you could use a SCART to phono socket adapter that is wired for output and use that to connect the headphone amp to.

I'm also wondering if you really need noise cancelling headphones. A good fully enclosed set of headphones should block out a lot of background noise anyway. And if the neighbours are that noisy then I'd be onto the Eviroment dept. of the council making a complaint!
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Old 13-01-2012, 10:32
Clank007
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Hi,
Yes the LG TV I own does not have a headphone socket of it's own - just an optical audio out socket.
Last night I tried a SCART to phono socket adapter that is wired for output as you suggested, but got no sound at all when plugging this in to my neighbour's headphone amp.

What would advise the best soloution to be please - connecting the optical socket to a standard amp and then plugging a standard headphone connection into the amp itself?
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Old 13-01-2012, 11:26
Dan's Dad
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Any advice gratefully received.
Maplin offer this Digital-to-Analogue Audio Convertor which has a headphone output -
but
its currently out of stock on line.

beware : "Connect most audio devices with a digital output (only 2-channel digital audio is supported)"
and it requires power via USB.

The customer reviews mention LG LCDs!
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Old 25-01-2012, 20:34
Clank007
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Hi,
After discussing my headphone requirements with a colleague from work, he recommended me to buy this.

One of the reviews says:
Just plug in you optical or coax cable in the input end, select the input feed using the switch on the side of the unit and connect your left and right i.e. red and white RCA connector to the output end and the unit will do the conversion for you. If you want to plug in 3.5mm headphones you will need a cable which has the two red and white RCA connectors at one end and the 3.5mm headphone socket at the other end

Is this the perfect solution do you think?
ie to buy this little gizmo, a headphone amp and the cable which has the two red and white RCA connectors at one end and the 3.5mm headphone socket at the other end? (this one)
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Old 25-01-2012, 20:48
grahamlthompson
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Hi,
After discussing my headphone requirements with a colleague from work, he recommended me to buy this.

One of the reviews says:
Just plug in you optical or coax cable in the input end, select the input feed using the switch on the side of the unit and connect your left and right i.e. red and white RCA connector to the output end and the unit will do the conversion for you. If you want to plug in 3.5mm headphones you will need a cable which has the two red and white RCA connectors at one end and the 3.5mm headphone socket at the other end

Is this the perfect solution do you think?
ie to buy this little gizmo, a headphone amp and the cable which has the two red and white RCA connectors at one end and the 3.5mm headphone socket at the other end?
Sounds like your colleague knows what he/she is talking about.
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Old 25-01-2012, 21:01
Clank007
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Hi,
I hope he does yes!
I've been searching for ages for a relatively cheap way of connecting good quality headphones to my optical audio out only setup on my LG LCD TV so am hoping I might have at last found it
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Old 25-01-2012, 21:11
grahamlthompson
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Hi,
I hope he does yes!
I've been searching for ages for a relatively cheap way of connecting good quality headphones to my optical audio out only setup on my LG LCD TV so am hoping I might have at last found it
It converts digital stereo to analogue stereo (the same as you will get from a pair of RCA phono outputs). There is one possible snag, if your TV has a Freesat-HD or Freeview-HD tuner and no way of selecting downmixing ac3 or DD audio to lpcm stereo then the amp won't work. Is there not a scart socket on the TV that outputs the audio for what you see ?
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Old 25-01-2012, 21:37
gomezz
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Or tell us the make and model of TV?
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Old 25-01-2012, 21:45
chrisjr
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Hi,
After discussing my headphone requirements with a colleague from work, he recommended me to buy this.

One of the reviews says:
Just plug in you optical or coax cable in the input end, select the input feed using the switch on the side of the unit and connect your left and right i.e. red and white RCA connector to the output end and the unit will do the conversion for you. If you want to plug in 3.5mm headphones you will need a cable which has the two red and white RCA connectors at one end and the 3.5mm headphone socket at the other end

Is this the perfect solution do you think?
ie to buy this little gizmo, a headphone amp and the cable which has the two red and white RCA connectors at one end and the 3.5mm headphone socket at the other end? (this one)
The bit you have put in bold is not correct advice though. The converter box is not designed to drive headphones. The line level outputs are intended to be connected to a high impedance amplifier input not low impedance headphones.

This may compromise the sound you get out of it. Plus there is no volume control. The optical out of the TV will almost certainly be fixed level, unaffected by the TV volume control. There is no control on the box for level.

So you will need a separate headphone amp connected to this unit. Or alternatively the base station of a pair of wireless headphones.
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Old 25-01-2012, 21:51
gomezz
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Or any old sterero or radio with an AUX IN and headphone OUT.
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Old 25-01-2012, 21:57
Clank007
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The bit you have put in bold is not correct advice though. The converter box is not designed to drive headphones. The line level outputs are intended to be connected to a high impedance amplifier input not low impedance headphones.

This may compromise the sound you get out of it. Plus there is no volume control. The optical out of the TV will almost certainly be fixed level, unaffected by the TV volume control. There is no control on the box for level.

So you will need a separate headphone amp connected to this unit. Or alternatively the base station of a pair of wireless headphones.
Hi, thanks for replying.
I have to admit though that I am now quite confused.
Where you mention connecting the base station of a pair of wireless headphones - again i'm not sure quite what you mean there, sorry
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Old 25-01-2012, 22:00
gomezz
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Or tell us the make and model of TV?
It really would help people help you if you told us this.
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Old 25-01-2012, 22:02
Clank007
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Sorry, Its a 32 Inch LG LCD TV. I'm not sure of the model number though

Edit: Just checked - its an LG 32LB76
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Old 25-01-2012, 22:13
chrisjr
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Hi, thanks for replying.
I have to admit though that I am now quite confused.
Where you mention connecting the base station of a pair of wireless headphones - again i'm not sure quite what you mean there, sorry
The digital to analogue converter linked to in your post is not designed to be used with headphones of the type you linked to in the first post. ie those types with a bit of wire coming out of the ear pieces to a jack plug.

Wireless headphones as the name suggests dispense with the bit of wire from the earpieces and instead use radio signals. The base station is the bit that plugs into the source of the audio and transmits that audio to the headphones.

It can be plugged into either a headphone socket or a line level output like that on the converter box. Without the problems that plugging a wired pair of headphones in involve.
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Old 25-01-2012, 22:30
Clank007
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The digital to analogue converter linked to in your post is not designed to be used with headphones of the type you linked to in the first post. ie those types with a bit of wire coming out of the ear pieces to a jack plug.

Wireless headphones as the name suggests dispense with the bit of wire from the earpieces and instead use radio signals. The base station is the bit that plugs into the source of the audio and transmits that audio to the headphones.

It can be plugged into either a headphone socket or a line level output like that on the converter box. Without the problems that plugging a wired pair of headphones in involve.
Ah, thanks Chris I think I now understand.

So basically the solution would be to buy the Digital to analogue convertor and connect that to the optical audio out socket on the back of the TV with an optical cable. Then buy a set of wireless headphones.and plug those into the line level output of the convertor. Is that the jist?
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Old 25-01-2012, 22:40
gomezz
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You would do better to connect the wireless headphone base station to the second SCART socket (marked AV2) using a suitable SCART converter lead.
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Old 25-01-2012, 22:41
chrisjr
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Ah, thanks Chris I think I now understand.

So basically the solution would be to buy the Digital to analogue convertor and connect that to the optical audio out socket on the back of the TV with an optical cable. Then buy a set of wireless headphones.and plug those into the line level output of the convertor. Is that the jist?
That would be one solution certainly. Or if you want to use wired headphones then plug the converter into a headphone amplifier.

Though one advantage of wireless headphones is the possibility to buy additional pairs of headphones so you can run as many pairs off the one base station as you like. Handy if there is more than one of you in the house. And no wires lurking to trip you up when you get up to make a cuppa! In fact you could probably wear the headphones all the way to the kitchen or the loo if you wanted.

For example
http://cpc.farnell.com/sennheiser/rs...110/dp/AV10375

http://cpc.farnell.com/sennheiser/hd...are/dp/AV13126

OK not the cheapest around but I have a lot of time for Sennheiser and haven't yet found a bad set of headphones from them.
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Old 25-01-2012, 22:48
Clank007
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That would be one solution certainly. Or if you want to use wired headphones then plug the converter into a headphone amplifier.

Though one advantage of wireless headphones is the possibility to buy additional pairs of headphones so you can run as many pairs off the one base station as you like. Handy if there is more than one of you in the house. And no wires lurking to trip you up when you get up to make a cuppa! In fact you could probably wear the headphones all the way to the kitchen or the loo if you wanted.

For example
http://cpc.farnell.com/sennheiser/rs...110/dp/AV10375

http://cpc.farnell.com/sennheiser/hd...are/dp/AV13126

OK not the cheapest around but I have a lot of time for Sennheiser and haven't yet found a bad set of headphones from them.
Thats awesome - many thanks Chris for taking the time to help me it is much apprceciated

Now all I have to do is find a way to con the missus into letting me spend some money
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Old 25-01-2012, 22:55
chrisjr
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You would do better to connect the wireless headphone base station to the second SCART socket (marked AV2) using an suitable SCART converter lead.
That is certainly an option. Provided the SCART out is able to feed audio from whatever source is being used. Not all can. Sometimes you only get the tuner output, not so good if you are watching a DVD or a Sky box.

The manual available online doesn't seem to mention what is output over SCART as far as I can see.
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Old 26-01-2012, 10:14
grahamlthompson
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The bit you have put in bold is not correct advice though. The converter box is not designed to drive headphones. The line level outputs are intended to be connected to a high impedance amplifier input not low impedance headphones.

This may compromise the sound you get out of it. Plus there is no volume control. The optical out of the TV will almost certainly be fixed level, unaffected by the TV volume control. There is no control on the box for level.

So you will need a separate headphone amp connected to this unit. Or alternatively the base station of a pair of wireless headphones.
Clank007's last statement is substantiallly correct he acknowledges he needs
The DAC and a headphone amplifier. If he uses Wireless Phones he can dispense with the amplifier.
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Old 27-01-2012, 04:19
pocatello
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Head over to headfi site, they have more info.

Closed headphones work better than supposed noise canceling for noisy neighbors.
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