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What are you drinking at the moment? (Part 3)


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Old 12-05-2015, 15:05
Clank007
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Hi,
I overheard a lady at work saying how cous cous was a delicious alternative to rice or spaghetti, but looking at a bag of it in the shops this lunchtime it doesn't say how to best cook it.

How do you guys cook yours if you have it? And is it a bland taste or do you add some sort of flavouring to yours?

Sorry for the ignorant questions
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Old 12-05-2015, 15:13
molliepops
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Put it in a jug add boiling water and leave for a few minutes, fluff with a fork.

Couldn't be easier IMO
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Old 12-05-2015, 15:22
luckylila
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Put it in a jug add boiling water and leave for a few minutes, fluff with a fork.

Couldn't be easier IMO
Same here. Boiling water and a lid or a plate on top for a few minutes. The packet said some complicated nonsense about steaming it on the hob, but you don't need to. This way works perfectly and is quick and easy.

It is bland though (I find it more bland than rice or pasta), so you definitely need to jazz it up with some strong flavours - plenty of seasoning and spice. It works well with 'wet' sauces because it soaks up the flavours.
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Old 12-05-2015, 15:27
Piazza
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I measure it out into a bowl or pan (measuring is important as it increases in size a lot when you cook it - about 60 g dry is enough for one serving), add twice as much boiling water (so 120 ml), stir, cover and leave for 10 minutes. Take lid off and fluff with a fork.

On its own it can be quite bland, but not in an unpleasant way - just like plain pasta or rice. For extra flavour I often make it with stock instead of plain water, or crumble in a stock cube, or add some flavourings like garlic powder, fresh herbs, lemon juice, nuts (pistachios or almonds)...

My favourite couscous recipes:

Moroccan chicken, chickpeas, couscous, pistachios, goat's cheese

Chicken with lemon and courgette couscous

Herby salmon and couscous parcels
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Old 12-05-2015, 16:13
Chirpy_Chicken
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I always just add a nob of butter to mine

But what is nice,is to soak some sultannas and then add them,
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Old 12-05-2015, 16:28
grassmarket
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It is basically just very tiny pasta.
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Old 12-05-2015, 16:32
Iggy's Boy
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I put a glug of olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper into a bowl before I add the couscous and twice as much boiling water. It helps stops the grains clumping together and seasons it.
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Old 12-05-2015, 16:38
farmer bob
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For quickness, you can also buy the little pre-packed pots of cous cous, with roasted vegetables & herbs etc in the Supermarkets.
Nice with a salad/grilled chicken.
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Old 12-05-2015, 16:38
postit
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I soak mine in home made chicken stock, then add roasted Mediterranean veggies to it. Utterly delicious
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Old 12-05-2015, 17:19
sarahj1986
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The Ainsley Harriott packets are very nice. I eat them often as an alternative myself.
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Old 12-05-2015, 17:46
Shrike
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I add a knob of butter to mine. I sometimes have it with steak as a change from chips. Also goes well with goulash.
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Old 12-05-2015, 21:57
swingaleg
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The Ainsley Harriott packets are very nice. I eat them often as an alternative myself.
I tried them but thought they were a huge waste of money.......compared to buying a standard pack of Cous Cous. Also doesn't AH say on the pack to fry it before adding water ?

I just put a few spoonfuls in a bowl and add boiling water and soak for a few minutes.........then I add it to the pan with my curry in and stir it around to soak up the juices.......

Must say when I discovered cous cous I pretty much gave up having rice


ps.......these days I don't have any 'carbs' with my curry, I use frozen peas as the bulking agent...........
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Old 12-05-2015, 22:04
missyalicia
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Prepare it with stock to flavour it or mix it with spices, chickpeas or whatever you like, and stuff a pepper with it.
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Old 13-05-2015, 04:24
annette kurten
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I tried them but thought they were a huge waste of money.......compared to buying a standard pack of Cous Cous. Also doesn't AH say on the pack to fry it before adding water ?

I just put a few spoonfuls in a bowl and add boiling water and soak for a few minutes.........then I add it to the pan with my curry in and stir it around to soak up the juices.......

Must say when I discovered cous cous I pretty much gave up having rice


ps.......these days I don't have any 'carbs' with my curry, I use frozen peas as the bulking agent...........
not as far as i can remember, it would be a weird way to treat a dried food, and wouldn`t that stop it from taking up the water?
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Old 13-05-2015, 06:28
sarahj1986
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I tried them but thought they were a huge waste of money.......compared to buying a standard pack of Cous Cous. Also doesn't AH say on the pack to fry it before adding water ?

I just put a few spoonfuls in a bowl and add boiling water and soak for a few minutes.........then I add it to the pan with my curry in and stir it around to soak up the juices.......

Must say when I discovered cous cous I pretty much gave up having rice


ps.......these days I don't have any 'carbs' with my curry, I use frozen peas as the bulking agent...........
No don't think it needs to be fried. I've certainly never done it. I like the AH ones. Yes buying a plain packet of cous cous is cheaper, I've done it before but I don't use it that often so it's easier to buy AH ones
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Old 13-05-2015, 07:53
Jambo_c
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I just put it in a bowl add enough stock to cover it, then cover the bowl and leave it until it's absorbed the stock. I then usually add harissa paste, or some spices such as cumin and coriander. I normally add red onion, tomato, cucumber, sometimes red peppers, chillies, spring onion etc.
I usually make a batch then have it cold for lunch at work in a salad with chorizo and prawns or sometimes chorizo and black pudding along with some nice homemade potato salad or coleslaw. If I'm having it warm I usually do it with roasted or charred veg and have it with Moroccan spiced lamb steaks or a tagine.
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Old 13-05-2015, 09:10
Glawster2002
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No don't think it needs to be fried. I've certainly never done it. I like the AH ones. Yes buying a plain packet of cous cous is cheaper, I've done it before but I don't use it that often so it's easier to buy AH ones
We buy the AH ones as well. More often than not they are on offer at the supermarkets, two-for-one for example, so we buy a couple of packets then.

We've never fried them first either.
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Old 13-05-2015, 10:52
stud u like
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There are numerous to cook cous cous.

1)In a tagine
2)Pour boiling water or stock on it and wait for it to absorb the liquid.
3) Just add it to soups and stews. Stir and wait for it to absorb the liquid.
4)Boil it in stock, wait for it to absorb, Make some little balls,burgers or fritters and fry them.
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Old 13-05-2015, 11:30
Clank007
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Hi, thanks for all the suggestions.

I'll be taking the route of pouring boiling stock water over them and leaving them for a minute or two this eve,
Cant believe I've never heard of cous cous before though - must be a well kept foody secret?
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Old 13-05-2015, 11:56
luckylila
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I put a glug of olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper into a bowl before I add the couscous and twice as much boiling water. It helps stops the grains clumping together and seasons it.
Nice tip. I'll try that.

Clank007, maybe you could let us know if you enjoy your first cous cous dinner!
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Old 13-05-2015, 17:55
Jellied Eel
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Cant believe I've never heard of cous cous before though - must be a well kept foody secret?
So's using it as cat litter. It's very popular, but also very orrible if cooked badly. It's semolina.. remember that from school dinners?

I've had some very nice Morrocan/Tunisian dishes with it, just not much luck cooking it myself. But having seen some of the suggestions here, may have another attempt.
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Old 13-05-2015, 18:14
bluefb
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I usually have it as a salad, so I hydrate it with cold water (I dissolve seasonings in the water first, e.g. salt, pepper, stock cubes, vinegar, lemon juice, dried herbs, spices, EVOO, tomato puree, mustard, soy sauce, sugar...). When hydrating it, it's better to add too little water than too much. You can always add more water if there's not enough; if there's too much it can turn into a sloppy mush.

I find that it's deceptively voluminous, so you can add loads of ingredients before you get a good ratio. The veg I add is mostly raw and the stuff I use elsewhere, so a combination of garlic, red onion, finely chopped/grated carrot, olives or raisins (not together as their flavours clash), peppers, tomato (chopped beforehand with the juice added to the stock), courgette and aubergine (cooked), chick peas etc. For protein, I mostly use chicken. Basically, you can tailor it to whatever flavour you like.
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Old 13-05-2015, 19:29
stud u like
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Hi, thanks for all the suggestions.

I'll be taking the route of pouring boiling stock water over them and leaving them for a minute or two this eve,
Cant believe I've never heard of cous cous before though - must be a well kept foody secret?
I went from semolina with strawberry jam on it as a child onto "cous cous" as an adult.
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Old 13-05-2015, 19:32
degsyhufc
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With cous cous and bulgar wheat I do cook it for a few minutes. I just think it helps the flavor absorb.

So cous cous in to a pan then 2 parts stock.
I like to add a spoonful or two of ratatouille. If not that then some chopped veg such as red onion and peppers (jarred roasted red peppers).

Finish with lots of fresh herbs.


Usually serve it with slow shredded meat. I find lamb is best, but gammon shank, rare steak, duck....
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Old 13-05-2015, 19:33
kimindex
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I also make a stock from vegetable stock, cumin, honey, chilli, garlic, saffron, cinnamon and ginger. I generally put red onion, courgettes, red pepper, chick peas, apricots, sultanas, roasted cherry tomatoes and rocket in it.
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