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Old 03-12-2014, 01:54
Richardcoulter
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This is on Film 4 shortly at 2:05 and Film 4 +1 at 3:05 for anybody interested

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2014338/

Not sure if Film 4 have a catch up service
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Old 03-12-2014, 08:05
David Waine
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The light sensitive emulsion on film contains silver, and the world's supply is running out. That is what has prompted the switch to digital. Obviously, it hasn't run out yet. You can still buy silver jewellery easily enough, and you can still buy film, but the writing is on the wall. As an amateur photographer who had his own darkroom, I would have preferred it if a suitable, and plentiful, substitute could have been found for silver - but it seems there wasn't one. At least digital appears to be able to match film in terms of image quality in the cinema these days, viewed subjectively. That was not the case at the turn of the century, but intensive development has worked wonders. I will set that programme to record and watch it with interest.
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Old 03-12-2014, 08:07
David Waine
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Just re-read the original post and it looks like I have missed it already. It will be repeated.
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Old 03-12-2014, 11:42
mike65
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I saw this the first time round and alas digital has won. I really love the look of a proper film - Technicolor and widescreen. Now nearly everything looks like expensive television/advertising. Digital also means its infinitely tweakable and that's a bad rather than a good thing as it means "in camera" techniques and floor effects have been almost banished in favour of post production knob twiddling.
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Old 03-12-2014, 20:28
Richardcoulter
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Just re-read the original post and it looks like I have missed it already. It will be repeated.
Yeah, sorry, I only noticed it just about the time it was due to start. You're right though, Film 4 are sure to repeat it.

Perhaps Film 4 have a catch up VOD service that you could watch it on now??
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Old 03-12-2014, 20:36
Gordie1
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There are a few interesting documentaries on you tube about the movement to digital and the restoration of old film that is near being lost forever, silver nitrate film especially is on its way out, to say the least.

As i say, some interesting stuff on youtube.
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Old 03-12-2014, 21:29
David Waine
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I saw this the first time round and alas digital has won. I really love the look of a proper film - Technicolor and widescreen. Now nearly everything looks like expensive television/advertising. Digital also means its infinitely tweakable and that's a bad rather than a good thing as it means "in camera" techniques and floor effects have been almost banished in favour of post production knob twiddling.
I only recently discovered that there were several Technicolors. Originally, it was a two colour process, but this soon gave way to what they called 'Imbivition', which used three separate films - each sensitive to a different primary colour. The three negatives were then printed onto a single tri-pack colour film for projection. The Imbivition process delivered superb results, but was, as you can imagine, very expensive. Technicolor abandoned it in the 1960s. Since then, Technicolor films have actually been made with Kodak's Eastmancolor film stock, but processed by themselves. The original Eastmancolor films of the 1950s did not compare with Technicolor for quality, but all that changed within twenty years. Today, such movies as are still shot on film are much more likely to be in Deluxe Color (another derivative of Eastmancolor).
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Old 05-12-2014, 04:16
IWasBored
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I watched this and its prompted me to not only get all my film books out but also borrow 2 more from the library. There was a great mix of people from film.

Although he is an old school auteur director, Wim Wenders has embrased new technology in his films including 3D. The thing is I never thought that masterpieces such as Wings Of Desire is faultless and would not be improved if they remastered it into 3D.

When I watch 28 Days Latter on dvd (I never saw it at the cinema) the image looks fine to me. What am I missing?
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Old 05-12-2014, 18:31
Virgil Tracy
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I watched this and its prompted me to not only get all my film books out but also borrow 2 more from the library. There was a great mix of people from film.

Although he is an old school auteur director, Wim Wenders has embrased new technology in his films including 3D. The thing is I never thought that masterpieces such as Wings Of Desire is faultless and would not be improved if they remastered it into 3D.

When I watch 28 Days Latter on dvd (I never saw it at the cinema) the image looks fine to me. What am I missing?
it was basically shot on video , I saw it in the cinema and there were times when it was painfully obvious , low resolution , and you get this kind of 'jiggling' on hard edges of objects .
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Old 08-12-2014, 00:45
stripedcat
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Digital is the future. I think it sort of helps that image quality has improved for the technology. 6K resolution has just started coming into use(Gone Girl used it). I think 8K is in works for digital cameras. I think digital can't match film for producing blacks yet.

For IMAX however, digital still lags behind. It's still a long way off what an analogue film 15/70mm IMAX can produce.

There is a necessity for archiving old films to digital, as well. That is another issue.
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Old 08-12-2014, 14:01
spiney2
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hmmm ...... several posts made form my mobile phone seem to have vanished .......
anyway, the main thing is economics. huge cost of printing film vs a dvd for maybe 50p. which can only play on special equipment with time limited password ...... every rights holder's wet dream ........
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