Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 

TV Torrents - Is it just as illigal as downloading movies?


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-11-2012, 11:59
lamby
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Oxford, UK
Posts: 2,892

Hey

I found a torrent site that shares TV shows all over the world. Is this just as illegal in the UK as downloading movies?

Thanks
lamby is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 08-11-2012, 12:00
russellelly
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Scotland
Posts: 10,343
If they're copyright, then I'm afraid so.
russellelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 12:01
chrisjr
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Reading
Posts: 21,847
Unless the owners of the copyright in the material available have given permission for it to be there then yes it more than likely is.
chrisjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 12:10
ironjade
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: London
Posts: 8,306
The odd thing is that no one seems to make much fuss about dowloading tv shows whereas downloading movies attracts the wrath of god.
Maybe it's because the tv show makers have already been paid.
ironjade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 12:34
flagpole
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 43,524
it's definitely illegal. whether it's just as illegal is debatable. i mean it is. but it's targetted less.

presumably because a downloaded film is seen as a lost sale, where as a tv show is just a lost viewer.

incidentally it is really the uploading that is illegal not the downloading. which is of course part of the way torrents work. cyberlockers, newsgroups lot safer.
flagpole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 12:43
s2k
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 5,000
The odd thing is that no one seems to make much fuss about dowloading tv shows whereas downloading movies attracts the wrath of god.
Maybe it's because the tv show makers have already been paid.
Yes its strange that. I will anonymously hold my hand up to downloading TV shows but I always buy my music and games etc.

I think the way many look at it is that if the show isn't licenced for broadcast over here, or the broadcaster has a ridiculously slow timescale for it, then its pretty much fair-game. A lot of the time stuff would have been broadcast FTA anyway so the only people who theoretically loose out are advertisers...but then thats no different to people skipping the ads on a PVR.
s2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 12:58
flagpole
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 43,524
Yes its strange that. I will anonymously hold my hand up to downloading TV shows but I always buy my music and games etc.

I think the way many look at it is that if the show isn't licenced for broadcast over here, or the broadcaster has a ridiculously slow timescale for it, then its pretty much fair-game. A lot of the time stuff would have been broadcast FTA anyway so the only people who theoretically loose out are advertisers...but then thats no different to people skipping the ads on a PVR.
I'm sure they don't consider it fair game.

it may not be clear who would do the enforcing and who looses out. but if they aren't doing it it's just because it's not cost effective.
flagpole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 13:15
finbaar
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,952
With music when you sign up to a service be it download like iTunes or Amazon or Play Music or one of the streaming sites you basically get ďallĒ of the music available. Now of course some things will be missing, but in the main you want a mainstream artist and it does not matter which service you have legitimately opted for you can get it electronically.

Contrast that with films and TV shows. I have signed up to Love Film Instant (for free through Talk Talk) and the selection is crap. I took my son to see Skyfall. He thought it was great so I said we would watch Casino Royale. I looked on LFI and yes they had Casino Royale to stream Ė the 1966 version. Well whoop de bloody doo. I then checked Play Movies and they donít have it either. So I will be watching Casino Royale (2006) streamed from 1Channel on my big telly. The business model for online content is broken. I want sign up to a streaming/download service and find, as with music, I can get all the mainstream stuff. But I canít. I am not allowed to pay for a service I want. But I can get the same service for free, even if it is dodgy. Utter utter bollocks.
finbaar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 13:28
unique
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,795
it's definitely illegal. whether it's just as illegal is debatable. i mean it is. but it's targetted less.

presumably because a downloaded film is seen as a lost sale, where as a tv show is just a lost viewer.

incidentally it is really the uploading that is illegal not the downloading. which is of course part of the way torrents work. cyberlockers, newsgroups lot safer.
in the UK downloading copywritten material without permission is illegal, as is uploading. when you download you create a copy and that is illegal. likewise streaming, albeit it's a temporary copy. it's quite a common misconception this. it's due to the fact that the chances of getting caught downloading are very slim compared to uploading. with torrents you usually upload as you download and broadcast your IP details whilst doing so, but with NTTP, HTTP and FTP hosts the law and copyright holders rarely have access to downloaders details so can't do anything about it.

downloading games, music, movies or tv shows without permission is just as illegal, it's just that normally different organisations deal with copyright and piracy for these different things and do so differently, thus it may seem that one thing is more illegal than another as you hear more about it
unique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 14:03
Paddy C
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 12,868
I have streamed TV shows online before. I only do it for shows that are not broadcast on TV over here and are not available on DVD so it's the only way to access them.
Paddy C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 14:41
mincepie
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Somewhere only we know...
Posts: 672
Just as illegal...but not yet chased much.
Shows that never make it to DVD - I can't see there being much rush right now to chase after these.
mincepie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 14:48
Earake
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Down South
Posts: 1,783
in the UK when you download you create a copy and that is illegal.
In current copyright legislation, it is the copying that is illegal, if you could download without making a copy then that technically isn't legislated although it may soon be. By uploading it is obvious that a copy has already been made, that's why the current GEIL/O2 NPO is for uploading only.

Restricted acts

It is an offence to perform any of the following acts without the consent of the owner:

Copy the work.
Rent, lend or issue copies of the work to the public.
Perform, broadcast or show the work in public.
Adapt the work.
The author of a work, or a director of a film may also have certain moral rights:
The right to be identified as the author.
Right to object to derogatory treatment.
Earake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 15:16
flagpole
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 43,524
in the UK downloading copywritten material without permission is illegal, as is uploading. when you download you create a copy and that is illegal. likewise streaming, albeit it's a temporary copy. it's quite a common misconception this. it's due to the fact that the chances of getting caught downloading are very slim compared to uploading. with torrents you usually upload as you download and broadcast your IP details whilst doing so, but with NTTP, HTTP and FTP hosts the law and copyright holders rarely have access to downloaders details so can't do anything about it.

downloading games, music, movies or tv shows without permission is just as illegal, it's just that normally different organisations deal with copyright and piracy for these different things and do so differently,
thus it may seem that one thing is more illegal than another as you hear more about it
really.
flagpole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 15:33
R410
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Guisborough, North Yorkshire
Posts: 2,878
Yes its strange that. I will anonymously hold my hand up to downloading TV shows but I always buy my music and games etc.
I do to, but then when I do it is only because the programme clashed with something else I watch.
I use it as an on-demand service, albeit an illegal one.

I wouldn't need to do this if Virgin Media allowed you to get a PVR without having to pay a monthly fee for it (the TiVo service).
R410 is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 15:36
R410
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Guisborough, North Yorkshire
Posts: 2,878
With music when you sign up to a service be it download like iTunes or Amazon or Play Music or one of the streaming sites you basically get ďallĒ of the music available. Now of course some things will be missing, but in the main you want a mainstream artist and it does not matter which service you have legitimately opted for you can get it electronically.

Contrast that with films and TV shows. I have signed up to Love Film Instant (for free through Talk Talk) and the selection is crap. I took my son to see Skyfall. He thought it was great so I said we would watch Casino Royale. I looked on LFI and yes they had Casino Royale to stream Ė the 1966 version. Well whoop de bloody doo. I then checked Play Movies and they donít have it either. So I will be watching Casino Royale (2006) streamed from 1Channel on my big telly. The business model for online content is broken. I want sign up to a streaming/download service and find, as with music, I can get all the mainstream stuff. But I canít. I am not allowed to pay for a service I want. But I can get the same service for free, even if it is dodgy. Utter utter bollocks.
Precisely the music industry has (sort of) embraced the digital age and come to the future, but the film and TV industry is still lagging behind.
I can understand restrictions being in place for new films, but films that are a couple of years old should more freely available (in the sense easier to get, not free to get)/
R410 is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 16:43
alcockell
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 20,367
Frustrates me about Blinkbox as well - it would be good if entire back catalogues were made available for rental streaming instead of just purchase... Between £2 and £4 is fine for an impulse rental.. but I'm not into the "pay £11 for a 'purchase' streaming licence for a film I may onyl want to watch once" thing...

I was interested in watching Wall Street 2 - but not interested enough to cough up £11. £3-4 would have been done in a heartbeat.
alcockell is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 16:46
unique
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,795
In current copyright legislation, it is the copying that is illegal, if you could download without making a copy then that technically isn't legislated although it may soon be. By uploading it is obvious that a copy has already been made, that's why the current GEIL/O2 NPO is for uploading only.
but when you stream it's considered making a copy, thus also illegal. the file still has to reside on the pc albeit temporarily for it to stream, whether on HDD/SDD or RAM
unique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 16:48
unique
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,795
yeah, for example the MPAA is concerned about movie rights and the RIAA is concerned about music rights. some rights holders organisations actually refrain from taking action about copyright even when they legally could, because they don't want adverse publicity. thus the different treatments of different media
unique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 17:08
Thine Wonk
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 10,220
yeah, for example the MPAA is concerned about movie rights and the RIAA is concerned about music rights. some rights holders organisations actually refrain from taking action about copyright even when they legally could, because they don't want adverse publicity. thus the different treatments of different media
The thing is the MPAA, the last A stands for America and we're not an American state, so they can be as concerned as they like but it's UK law that will be applicable here.
Thine Wonk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 17:51
Earake
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Down South
Posts: 1,783
but when you stream it's considered making a copy, thus also illegal. the file still has to reside on the pc albeit temporarily for it to stream, whether on HDD/SDD or RAM
I disagree, not even the Americans have gone that far :

In the USA, as regards streaming, the Copyright Office contends there is no violation when "a reproduction manifests itself so fleetingly that it cannot be copied, perceived or communicated."
But if the source of the stream has illegally copied then that's a different matter.
Earake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 19:02
daveycrocket222
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,979
Hey

I found a torrent site that shares TV shows all over the world. Is this just as illegal in the UK as downloading movies?

Thanks
Of course its not the same thing! Movies are being sold in Cinema and DVDs. Its completely different. How else do you get to see old shows of Deal or No Deal or some documentary or comedy show that probably will never get a official DVD release so its the only way to see it because all these iplayers dont show everything.
daveycrocket222 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 19:37
flagpole
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 43,524
Of course its not the same thing! Movies are being sold in Cinema and DVDs. Its completely different. How else do you get to see old shows of Deal or No Deal or some documentary or comedy show that probably will never get a official DVD release so its the only way to see it because all these iplayers dont show everything.
You're not an expert are you.
flagpole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 22:13
unique
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,795
The thing is the MPAA, the last A stands for America and we're not an American state, so they can be as concerned as they like but it's UK law that will be applicable here.
that's right. what does the E in example stand for?
unique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 22:14
unique
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,795
I disagree, not even the Americans have gone that far :



But if the source of the stream has illegally copied then that's a different matter.
you can disagree all you want, in this country it would be up to our courts to decide
unique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 22:17
unique
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,795
Of course its not the same thing! Movies are being sold in Cinema and DVDs. Its completely different. How else do you get to see old shows of Deal or No Deal or some documentary or comedy show that probably will never get a official DVD release so its the only way to see it because all these iplayers dont show everything.
you don't. just because something isn't legally available doesn't mean you have to right to obtain it illegally

aside from why anyone would want to watch deal or no deal in the first place, if shows are pirated to satisfy demand of fans, then it reduces the chances of shows being released officially as the demand is reduced
unique is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 13:32.