Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 

Brassed Off


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-12-2012, 01:48
LevitationStone
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 52

I just watched this again and was really moved for a couple of reasons.

The first was that it made me proud to be British. I felt they captured our spirit really well when making that film. Whilst it might be a gritty tale, I watched those miners with pride and though I knew the ending (mainly from remembering the closures myself), I was still routing for them.

I found myself wondering whether the areas where they depended on mining for a living have actually managed to recover? Does anybody know?

Almost a quarter of a million people lost their jobs, livelihoods and way of life. How they kept going is a miracle of the human spirit.

I know there were those who committed suicide and I can see why but, for those who survived and kept going, I wonder what life is like now.

All this from a film! It proves that it's a good one.
LevitationStone is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 06-12-2012, 08:23
Ted Cunterblast
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 3,946
Can't answer your question but loved the movie.


Favorite line is when Postlethwaite and his are riding off on the bike with the guys wife throwing plates at them...


'Bit clumsy with the crockery, your Sandra!'


And the scene where they play Danny Boy outside the hospital is incredibly moving and poignant, especially in view of Postlethwaites sad passing in real life.


And it was astonishing how you forget how a brass band, generally not regarding by most people for producing such moving music, can produce something so incredible and emotional.
Ted Cunterblast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 08:36
ironjade
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: London
Posts: 8,325
I'm from a mining area and everyone seems to be loaded even without the pit.
Bear in mind that striking miners got very little sympathy from the locals. When my dad heard they were collecting in London he was livid. "Don't give 'em a penny!" was his response.
"Brassed Off" makes me ill just thinking about it. Also Ewan McGregor's Yorkshire accent was crap.
ironjade is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 08:37
legzakimbo
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Newport, Wales
Posts: 454
Might get a re-watch this weekend.
A powerful film that displays the joys of socialism and the evils of a conservative government, or on the other hand if you are rich ,the despair of socialism and wonder of 11 years of thatcher..
legzakimbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 10:30
grimtales1
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: St. Albans, UK, Team Wagner
Posts: 38,906
Can't answer your question but loved the movie.


Favorite line is when Postlethwaite and his are riding off on the bike with the guys wife throwing plates at them...


'Bit clumsy with the crockery, your Sandra!'


And the scene where they play Danny Boy outside the hospital is incredibly moving and poignant, especially in view of Postlethwaites sad passing in real life.


And it was astonishing how you forget how a brass band, generally not regarding by most people for producing such moving music, can produce something so incredible and emotional.
I had to watch this in college for film studies and that scene got to me too
grimtales1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 13:32
LevitationStone
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 52
Can't answer your question but loved the movie.


Favorite line is when Postlethwaite and his are riding off on the bike with the guys wife throwing plates at them...


'Bit clumsy with the crockery, your Sandra!'


And the scene where they play Danny Boy outside the hospital is incredibly moving and poignant, especially in view of Postlethwaites sad passing in real life.


And it was astonishing how you forget how a brass band, generally not regarding by most people for producing such moving music, can produce something so incredible and emotional.
I completely agree with the latter. I remember that I used to really quite dislike brass band music when I was a teenager and so, almost didn't watch this film. I am so glad that I did because there's a beauty and a meloncholic power to brass...

Haha, I love that bit with the crockery too! I also like (though it's sad) the way that guy and his wife keep passing each other in the morning/night all the time and you're waiting for them to have an actual conversation because he keeps pausing as if he wants to say something.
LevitationStone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 13:37
Takae
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 8,284
And the scene where they play Danny Boy outside the hospital is incredibly moving and poignant, especially in view of Postlethwaites sad passing in real life.
I still can't get over Postlethwaite's passing. I recently saw a Sharpe episode featuring him as a psychotic soldier. He was amazing.

Let's be honest: where he's concerned, it's dead easy to find top 10 performances in his career. He provided those in spades.
Takae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 14:04
Iphigenia
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 7,857
I adore(d) Brassed Off. Firstly, behind a brass band you could march me off a cliff, I love the music. Secondly, I just thought it a good film. I like when the girl comes to play "Orange Juice".
Iphigenia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2012, 10:55
nightporter
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Doncaster
Posts: 826
Bear in mind that striking miners got very little sympathy from the locals.
I don't know what area you're from but up here in S. Yorkshire the locals were very supportive.
nightporter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2012, 11:49
ironjade
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: London
Posts: 8,325
I don't know what area you're from but up here in S. Yorkshire the locals were very supportive.
West Yorkshire. I think the general feeling was that if the miners hadn't held on to enough of their brass to help them through the strike then it was hard lines.
ironjade is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2012, 12:17
Pavster
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 946
There weren't really a lot of coal mines in W Yorkshire were there? Maybe a couple right out towards the boundary of Wakefield/Barnsley.
Pavster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2012, 22:37
Black Velvet
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 682
It's a good film but makes a point with the miners and the closing down of the pits. The Thatcher goverment. It is sad in places.
It's a film that makes you think as well as being entertaining. "Where's the collier's arms?" asks Gloria. Women reply "on the collier's shoulders".
Black Velvet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2012, 23:58
annielou
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 2,145
One of my favourite films. I don't think Stephen Tompkinson has done anything better since.
annielou is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 00:08
sheila blige
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 4,566
West Yorkshire. I think the general feeling was that if the miners hadn't held on to enough of their brass to help them through the strike then it was hard lines.
Well I lived in Leeds at the time of the Miner's strike and there was a lot of support for them. And quite rightly so.
sheila blige is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 19:07.