Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 

Wirelessly Send RF Signal


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-12-2012, 12:27
Gizmo9000
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10

I have just got my hands on a USB freeview dongle for my laptop, which is pretty awesome, but it's a bit of a pain trailing a long aerial cable from the wall socket just to use it. Sadly the signal in my area is not good enough to use the portable aerial that came with it.

So, I was thinking, is there a way I can plug a transmitter into the aerial socket that will send the signal to a receiver that I can connect to the dongle?

I'm not talking about re-broadcasting the actual RF signal as it is, but using something like the 2.4GHz band or something similar.

Any ideas?
Gizmo9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 08-12-2012, 13:54
mac2708
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 3,007
A cabled connection from the aerial to the USB Freeview dongle is the only legal way to do it

Video senders will only re-transmit an A/V not an RF source

If were so simple to do as you wish no-one would need bother with multiple aerial outlets/distribution systems/loft boxes and the like
mac2708 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 15:52
Gizmo9000
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
How annoying.

Even if the signal is being sent as a NON broadcast signal? You can get TV extenders which do much the same thing, so why is what I want illegal?
Gizmo9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 16:06
grahamlthompson
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Redditch Worcs
Posts: 15,756
How annoying.

Even if the signal is being sent as a NON broadcast signal? You can get TV extenders which do much the same thing, so why is what I want illegal?
Because these devices use a part of the rf spectrum licensed for them. Like Wifi for routers. The uhf spectrum is solely for TV and now 4G mobile comms.

You could very easily interfere with legal transmissions.

You could legally attach a video sender to a Freeview box and it's receiver to a usb capture device on your PC. Trouble is you need power for that as well.

What you need is freeview device with a dnla server that can stream live content. You can watch some live TV via the internet anyway.
grahamlthompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 16:39
Gizmo9000
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Perhaps I wasn't making myself clear - I'm looking for a non-UHF transmitter/receiver.

Something like a box that will convert the RF signal into a WiFi type signal, then the reverse on the other end. Regular TV extenders don't cause interference. Maybe something in the 2.4GHz range.

Only the receiver will be able to actually receive the signals from the transmitter. I'm not suggesting something to rebroadcast the RF signal as it is. Think of it as something along the lines of wireless headphones, only instead of sound coming out the other end it is the RF signal.
Gizmo9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 17:49
grahamlthompson
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Redditch Worcs
Posts: 15,756
Perhaps I wasn't making myself clear - I'm looking for a non-UHF transmitter/receiver.

Something like a box that will convert the RF signal into a WiFi type signal, then the reverse on the other end. Regular TV extenders don't cause interference. Maybe something in the 2.4GHz range.

Only the receiver will be able to actually receive the signals from the transmitter. I'm not suggesting something to rebroadcast the RF signal as it is. Think of it as something along the lines of wireless headphones, only instead of sound coming out the other end it is the RF signal.
To carry 6 mux at a lower frequency would require enormous bandwidth. AV senders only have to deal with a single channel not even a complete mux. At the PC end you would have to recreate the 6 mux as received by your aerial, the kit will cost thousands. Your WiFi could not possibly handle the amount of data involved.
grahamlthompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 22:30
Gizmo9000
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
To carry 6 mux at a lower frequency would require enormous bandwidth. AV senders only have to deal with a single channel not even a complete mux. At the PC end you would have to recreate the 6 mux as received by your aerial, the kit will cost thousands. Your WiFi could not possibly handle the amount of data involved.
That is not something I had considered. What is the bandwidth capabilities of a standard co-ax lead then??
Gizmo9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 22:50
grahamlthompson
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Redditch Worcs
Posts: 15,756
That is not something I had considered. What is the bandwidth capabilities of a standard co-ax lead then??
It's capable of passing the whole UHF spectrum (21-69), at the same time the VHF spectrum as well, and a quality cable satellite as well.

Consider pre DSO, a single sat grade coax with suitable kit can handle.

5 Analogue channels each using a single uhf frequency carrier, 6 digital mux with dozens of channels and hundreds of satellite channels all at the same time, plus radio in the VHF band (digital and analogue).
grahamlthompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 23:03
Gizmo9000
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
That's a lot of bandwidth.

It would appear an ugly co-ax trailing over the floor to my laptop is the only solution then. Shame.
Gizmo9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 09:12
kev
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: South Notts (Waltham TV TX)
Posts: 19,428
One possible option is to get a Raspberry Pi and connect the TV card to that, install Raspbmc onto it and configure TV Headend on the Pi (Requires your TV card to have support on Linux - alas my TV card draws too much power from the USB port, but is about a decade old now!) (You'll need a TV/Monitor with HDMI input, a keyboard, and mouse to get it all up and running though).

Then install XBMC on your Laptop and configure that to use your Raspberry Pi TV Headend server as the TV source - then bobs your uncle, watch TV over WiFi - It's pretty neat that I can do this on my laptop and mobile at the same time*

Not quite a plug and play system but works rather well (I'm using my Linux media centre as the device to plug the TV card into due to the power issues though). You would also need an SD card and mobile charger plugged in the Pi (I had spares of both kicking about).

* N.B. While I can watch BBC ONE on the media centre, BBC TWO on my mobile, BBC News 24 on my Laptop while recording BBC Three and BBC Four all at the same time, what you can't do is watch channels on two multiplexes simultaneously.
kev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 10:11
mac2708
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 3,007

It would appear an ugly co-ax trailing over the floor to my laptop is the only solution then. Shame.
Or have another aerial socket fitted near to where you use the laptop
mac2708 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 14:14
Gizmo9000
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Kev, that's a great idea, although I'm not sure it'll work with Linux - on the box it only mentions Windows as supported OS.

Here's the Dongle in question though:

http://r.ebay.com/QB3MUD

I was thinking of putting a media PC together - just need to find a cheap box to stick behind the TV.
Gizmo9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 14:32
kev
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: South Notts (Waltham TV TX)
Posts: 19,428
Kev, that's a great idea, although I'm not sure it'll work with Linux - on the box it only mentions Windows as supported OS.

Here's the Dongle in question though:

http://r.ebay.com/QB3MUD

I was thinking of putting a media PC together - just need to find a cheap box to stick behind the TV.
Well the Raspberry Pi would meet the criteria of being cheap - however I would be tempted by something with a bit more grunt unless you are sticking to MP4 and MPEG2 (i.e. Freeview including HD plus DVDs). My Media Centre PC is an Acer Revo (first one) which is a bit underpowered in the menus and a pain to get the Nvidia graphics chip working right, but other than that works wonderfully!

It's hard to advise on the USB Stick's Linux support as I'm no expert, but trying it on a Live CD edition of Ubuntu would be able to tell you if it works! (Or use OpenELEC on a USB stick and check the TV Card that way https://www.lonelycoder.com/redmine/...14/topics/4798 )

One thing I should point out is that I am in the same room as the access point when streaming TV - if I'm in the kitchen it can be a bit glitchy (not too annoying as the sound survives), back in the lounge where there is another access point connected via HomePlugs it works fine too. So if your WiFi signal is a little on the low side it might be problematic.
kev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 14:38
Gizmo9000
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
My old man has Linux running on his laptop - I'm visiting over Christmas so I'll have a go then and see what happens.

As for the WiFi signal side of things, the main router is in a different room, although the signal where I am is pretty strong. I have a spare wireless router that I wanted to turn into an access point/WiFi extender, but I'm not sure how to do that - any thoughts? It would be easier if I had things like the media PC and my Xbox, etc. connected via cables to that, which is in turn connected wirelessly to the main router (which is a BT home hub).
Gizmo9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:11.