Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 
 

The Sky at Night - Monday 7 Jan 2013, BBC1


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-02-2013, 21:35
Rodney McKay
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 6,692
Not so, most people start with an interest, read books etc, start off with a pair of binoculars - which Patrick Moore always said was the best way - and eventually buy a serious instrument when you've worked out more or less what you are going to be interested in seeing.

In any case, The Sky at Night was generally a programme about the subject itself. In the recent past they featured technically competent amateurs at star parties and so on, which is one thing, but as for complete beginners, I don't see the point.
Patrick often did shows for beginners. Patrick always took plenty of time, there was nothing worse for him than for someone to get frustrated trying to set up or not know how to use their telescope correctly and then give up with it.

I had my first telescope when I was about 8 or 9 and I certainly remember having problems with it.
Rodney McKay is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 07-02-2013, 00:26
Mystic Dave
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,153
I have watched SaN quite often since I was in short trousers and the beauty of it is that they cover the basics as well as the technical stuff (some of which just goes over me!). So, after the news coverage of PM's passing, I expect they thought there would be new viewers, so they started with something basic related to the aurorae as PM mentioned that in his last prog. It is always quite instructive just to scale the relative distances in the solar system just to give an idea of its size.

As it is a new era, it would be appropriate to start in similar style to the first SaN and the team are quite capable of avoiding the dumbing down.
Mystic Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 08:51
quarton
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1
Hi. Just to clarify a couple of points, Sky at Night does not appear on iPlayer until the extended BBC 4 programme airs. The laughter at the end of the Sun King programme, after we had all said goodnight was because the Flamsteed Society joined in and we weren't expecting them to

But my main reason for posting was to address the projection vs film issue. It's a bit of a myth that projection is the safest way to view the Sun. I've seen articles on it that describe the technique as a general method for solar observing - it's not! Point a reflector or SCT at the Sun and there's a good chance you'll damage the scope. Projection is really just for smallish refractors.

Then there's the issue of leaving a scope set up for projection for a minute or two. You only have to get someone to wonder what the instrument is looking at and try and take a peek through it for disaster to occur.

The concentrated light from the Sun can also cause issues with refractors too. Near focal plane baffles can heat up and even burn/melt, damaging the focuser and/or eyepiece.

AstroSolar film on the other hand, plays safe. There's no heat build up at all and the method can be used with any type and size of telescope (subject to being able to find a piece of film large enough -1x0.5m is the largest size, but an offset mask can be used if you don't want to go that big).

Film also paves the way for high quality imaging of the Sun in white light. This can't be done with projection.

I've been observing the Sun regularly since the early 70's using all sorts of methods. For me, film is the safest and best way to observe the white light Sun without question.

Pete L
quarton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 12:59
brangdon
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Nottingham, UK
Posts: 10,601
Yet here they all were pointing a telescope straight at it! Not sure I heard any warnings?
I heard plenty. Safety was a constant refrain.

I mean asking if it was ok to just tie the solar filter over the end of the tube! Really!!
She may have been told to ask that, so the answer could convey that bit of safety advice to the audience.
brangdon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 13:41
fmradiotuner1
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: TheEssexSunshineCoast Clacton
Posts: 12,765
Just watched the episode about the sun today and found it quite good.
fmradiotuner1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 14:56
Rich Tea.
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Newport Pagnell
Posts: 11,325
With solar flares and close shave asteriods in the news, as well as the sighting of comet Ison in the sky and its anticipated brightness later in the year, early into 2014, it has certainly been a good week to get people interested in astronomy. The comet especially excites me if it becomes as bright as possibly predicted and doesn't burn up around the sun when it arrives.

Also thanks to Pete for the explanation on a few things about this months edition.
Rich Tea. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 15:12
Rodney McKay
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 6,692
Hi. Just to clarify a couple of points, Sky at Night does not appear on iPlayer until the extended BBC 4 programme airs. The laughter at the end of the Sun King programme, after we had all said goodnight was because the Flamsteed Society joined in and we weren't expecting them to

But my main reason for posting was to address the projection vs film issue. It's a bit of a myth that projection is the safest way to view the Sun. I've seen articles on it that describe the technique as a general method for solar observing - it's not! Point a reflector or SCT at the Sun and there's a good chance you'll damage the scope. Projection is really just for smallish refractors.

Then there's the issue of leaving a scope set up for projection for a minute or two. You only have to get someone to wonder what the instrument is looking at and try and take a peek through it for disaster to occur.

The concentrated light from the Sun can also cause issues with refractors too. Near focal plane baffles can heat up and even burn/melt, damaging the focuser and/or eyepiece.

AstroSolar film on the other hand, plays safe. There's no heat build up at all and the method can be used with any type and size of telescope (subject to being able to find a piece of film large enough -1x0.5m is the largest size, but an offset mask can be used if you don't want to go that big).

Film also paves the way for high quality imaging of the Sun in white light. This can't be done with projection.

I've been observing the Sun regularly since the early 70's using all sorts of methods. For me, film is the safest and best way to observe the white light Sun without question.

Pete L
Many thanks for the answers Pete. Also I think we're all glad to see the show carrying on as before as well.
Rodney McKay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 17:17
Rich Tea.
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Newport Pagnell
Posts: 11,325
Many thanks for the answers Pete. Also I think we're all glad to see the show carrying on as before as well.
I would really enjoy the prospect of the entire series of every single episode of The Sky At Night, presuming the early ones are available and were not wiped, being placed into an online BBC TV archive to view. They would be so interesting, and also educational too. I believe this would amount to around 700 editions.
Rich Tea. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 17:42
Rodney McKay
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 6,692
The producer of SaN has stated that the show WILL continue on. So looks good to me.
Rodney McKay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 18:25
JezR
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 340
All editions of the Sky at Night exist from Jan 1976. As to older editions twenty-six or thereabouts still exist from the 1960s in full or part, the earliest in full being May 1960 on Uranus.

As to viewing the sun through filters, Patrick's complete no-no advice was from an era where the filters sold were nothing more than eyepieces using very dark glass. These could shatter with the heat - and didn't stop infrared. The materials for modern aperture filters are a whole different thing
JezR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 17:28
elfcurry
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,080
Tomorrow:
Sun 23:55 The Sky at Night Moore Winter Marathon Results To find out how everyone got on in Sir Patrick Moore's last Moore Winter Marathon, Chris Lintott and Lucie Green travel to the Kielder observatory. Also in HD.
elfcurry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2013, 14:38
atg
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: London
Posts: 2,690
All editions of the Sky at Night exist from Jan 1976. As to older editions twenty-six or thereabouts still exist from the 1960s in full or part, the earliest in full being May 1960 on Uranus.
It would be great to see some of those, nay, all of them, in some form or another. We're getting regular Top of the Pops repeats from the same era, so how about it? A regular slot for old clips in the repeat edition? Alternatively some dvd releases, grouped by subject or year, or even a one-off, in-yer-face, 30 disc box-set?

As to viewing the sun through filters, Patrick's complete no-no advice was from an era where the filters sold were nothing more than eyepieces using very dark glass. These could shatter with the heat - and didn't stop infrared. The materials for modern aperture filters are a whole different thing
Fair point. I bought a telescope in the 70s with one of those focal point filters, which was lunacy really. The object end filters are obviously intrinsically safer. However, for sheer ease of viewing, and for the fact that you don't ever have to have your face turned towards the sun I'd still think projection has its advantages for purely visual purposes. Many more people at a time can see the image for a start.
atg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 00:24
Wmsheep
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 300
Just watched the Sky at Night "Moore's Marathon" result show, and have to say that Chris seems to be emerging out of his shell, and finally developing a personality!!

OK, so it helps that he is presenting along with Lucie Green, but he suddenly seems a whole lot more confident.

Hope that the show continues to go to even greater heights!!
Wmsheep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 00:38
TelevisionUser
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Storbritannia
Posts: 20,876
Just watched the Sky at Night "Moore's Marathon" result show, and have to say that Chris seems to be emerging out of his shell, and finally developing a personality!!

OK, so it helps that he is presenting along with Lucie Green, but he suddenly seems a whole lot more confident.

Hope that the show continues to go to even greater heights!!
It was also good to see another of Sir Patrick's friends, the impressionist Jon Culshaw, present as well.
TelevisionUser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 00:44
Rodney McKay
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 6,692
Just watched the Sky at Night "Moore's Marathon" result show, and have to say that Chris seems to be emerging out of his shell, and finally developing a personality!!

OK, so it helps that he is presenting along with Lucie Green, but he suddenly seems a whole lot more confident.

Hope that the show continues to go to even greater heights!!
Yes they seem to have a good team of people that Patrick helped build up over the years.

My only gripe is why we have to wait until Thursday for the 30 minute version, I really don't see why the BBC still does the shorter show these days.
Rodney McKay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 10:18
fmradiotuner1
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: TheEssexSunshineCoast Clacton
Posts: 12,765
I missed it last night.
Also now there is no BBC HD so will the HD version turn up on iplayer?
fmradiotuner1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 10:23
JeffG1
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Newbury
Posts: 4,793
I missed it last night.
Also now there is no BBC HD so will the HD version turn up on iplayer?
JeffG1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 14:02
stargazer61
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Dirty thirty and proud!
Posts: 44,979
Just watched the Sky at Night "Moore's Marathon" result show, and have to say that Chris seems to be emerging out of his shell, and finally developing a personality!!

OK, so it helps that he is presenting along with Lucie Green, but he suddenly seems a whole lot more confident.

Hope that the show continues to go to even greater heights!!
Chris is one of the nicest men I have ever met and I am sure that Patrick would be delighted that Chris is playing a part in keeping the legacy of Sky at Night going strong. I think he is a little shy and modest and, like Patrick, someone who allows others to contribute to a discussion even if they are relative novices despite hi s own considerable academic background. Given the massive success of Galaxy Zoo, I think there will be a little more emphasis in Sky at Night in encouraging the involvement of beginners as well as the usual monthly updates.
stargazer61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 14:59
Julie1222
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 334
So pleased that they are going to be carrying on with the SKy at Night now Patrick has gone.

I did wonder if the BBC would use Patrick's passing as an excuse to kill the programme. One thing in the SKy at Nights favour is it must cost pennies to make, so costs are not an issue.

There was also the worry that if they did carry the Sky at Night on they would ruin it with some stupid presenter who knew nothing about the subject and was just stunt casting.

My fear was they do the thing the BBC do so much now and plonk a comedian into the job. Don't laugh, we have comedians presenting science programmes now ( Science Club) . I know there is Jon Culshaw. But he loves astronomy and just happens to be a comedian. Not the same thing.

I suppose the fact that a small group of experts had built up to help Patrick over the last 5 years or so when he was poorly helped. It meant that there was a ready made group to take over.

I also agree with the comments about Chris Linnott. He does seem to be coming out his shell. Being Patrick Moore's apprenctice must have been a dificult role to fill. So now I suppose he can be himself more.

I just hope the viewing figures keep up and the BBC show long term commitment to the show.
Julie1222 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 15:57
Rodney McKay
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 6,692
So pleased that they are going to be carrying on with the SKy at Night now Patrick has gone.

I did wonder if the BBC would use Patrick's passing as an excuse to kill the programme. One thing in the SKy at Nights favour is it must cost pennies to make, so costs are not an issue.

There was also the worry that if they did carry the Sky at Night on they would ruin it with some stupid presenter who knew nothing about the subject and was just stunt casting.

My fear was they do the thing the BBC do so much now and plonk a comedian into the job. Don't laugh, we have comedians presenting science programmes now ( Science Club) . I know there is Jon Culshaw. But he loves astronomy and just happens to be a comedian. Not the same thing.

I suppose the fact that a small group of experts had built up to help Patrick over the last 5 years or so when he was poorly helped. It meant that there was a ready made group to take over.

I also agree with the comments about Chris Linnott. He does seem to be coming out his shell. Being Patrick Moore's apprenctice must have been a dificult role to fill. So now I suppose he can be himself more.

I just hope the viewing figures keep up and the BBC show long term commitment to the show.
The BBC seem committed to it for the time being at least. I also suspect the BBC know if they tried to kill the show especially now they'd be in a right old battle.

I'm reminded of Alistair Cooke's 'Letter from America' which like the SaN ran for decades but when he died the BBC canned it (well they did something else but it got canned). The difference is that with the SaN the show has a regular presenter now (I don't know if Lucie Green will be permanent) in Chris Lintott and of course it also has Chris North, Pete and Paul.

I wonder if they've decided to make Lucie more permanent as Chris like her is a working scientist and they may well need to share the fronting of the show due to work commitments (clearly as the years went on Chris was having to do more of the presenting and the overseas stuff as Patrick couldn't manage it)

I have to agree that I'm glad they haven't bought in some airhead or Richard Bacon type to 'youf-anize it' so to speak
Rodney McKay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 17:06
TelevisionUser
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Storbritannia
Posts: 20,876
Chris is one of the nicest men I have ever met and I am sure that Patrick would be delighted that Chris is playing a part in keeping the legacy of Sky at Night going strong. I think he is a little shy and modest and, like Patrick, someone who allows others to contribute to a discussion even if they are relative novices despite hi s own considerable academic background. Given the massive success of Galaxy Zoo, I think there will be a little more emphasis in Sky at Night in encouraging the involvement of beginners as well as the usual monthly updates.
So pleased that they are going to be carrying on with the SKy at Night now Patrick has gone.

I did wonder if the BBC would use Patrick's passing as an excuse to kill the programme. One thing in the SKy at Nights favour is it must cost pennies to make, so costs are not an issue.

There was also the worry that if they did carry the Sky at Night on they would ruin it with some stupid presenter who knew nothing about the subject and was just stunt casting.

My fear was they do the thing the BBC do so much now and plonk a comedian into the job. Don't laugh, we have comedians presenting science programmes now ( Science Club) . I know there is Jon Culshaw. But he loves astronomy and just happens to be a comedian. Not the same thing.

I suppose the fact that a small group of experts had built up to help Patrick over the last 5 years or so when he was poorly helped. It meant that there was a ready made group to take over.

I also agree with the comments about Chris Linnott. He does seem to be coming out his shell. Being Patrick Moore's apprenctice must have been a dificult role to fill. So now I suppose he can be himself more.

I just hope the viewing figures keep up and the BBC show long term commitment to the show.
Chris was publicly endorsed by Sir Patrick as his successor and I am pleased that he and Lucie work well together in presenting the programme. I am very glad that it hasn't been dumbed down like certain other BBC science programmes.

It would be great to see some of those, nay, all of them, in some form or another. We're getting regular Top of the Pops repeats from the same era, so how about it? A regular slot for old clips in the repeat edition? Alternatively some dvd releases, grouped by subject or year, or even a one-off, in-yer-face, 30 disc box-set?

Fair point. I bought a telescope in the 70s with one of those focal point filters, which was lunacy really. The object end filters are obviously intrinsically safer. However, for sheer ease of viewing, and for the fact that you don't ever have to have your face turned towards the sun I'd still think projection has its advantages for purely visual purposes. Many more people at a time can see the image for a start.
I have only ever projected the Sun, which gives a fine image anyway, because of that potential safety aspect and that is the only method I will recommend to anyone else because it's virtually foolproof.
TelevisionUser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2013, 01:03
Mystic Dave
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,153

My fear was they do the thing the BBC do so much now and plonk a comedian into the job. Don't laugh, we have comedians presenting science programmes now ( Science Club) . I know there is Jon Culshaw. But he loves astronomy and just happens to be a comedian. Not the same thing.
To be fair, Dara O'Briain does have a degree in maths and theoretical physics.
Mystic Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2013, 18:20
ItJustMyOpinion
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: London
Posts: 17,069
Patrick Moore said the reason the BBC didn't cancel the Sky at Night was because it was cheap and uncontroversial. I would add that due to their commitment to public service broadcasting, they may have the government breathing down their necks as well, if they replaced it by some trash, the independent channels normally handle.

Plus I notice they are focussing on amateur astronomers and getting them involved. This is a good move in my view, as they will have a new generation of loyal fans who will fight to keep the show on air.
ItJustMyOpinion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-03-2013, 18:35
Rodney McKay
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 6,692
According to Chris Lintott latest viewing figures for most recent episode were 1 million!
Rodney McKay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2013, 10:51
atg
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: London
Posts: 2,690
I must have missed the extended version this month, was it on last week? If so I didn't notice it. Does anybody know if it's available anywhere online at all?
atg is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:14.