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Old 13-02-2014, 14:32
TheGrumpWizard
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How did Humph suss out the buried bag and know exactly where it was?
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Old 13-02-2014, 14:53
RFS
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I wondered that. A few times, when Humphrey is speaking his lines, I thought that that was something that DI Poole would say. I even heard RP's/BM's voice in my head! Which means, I am hearing voices now...
That could well be - I said from the start that sometimes KM's delivery feel a little "forced" but I coulnd't really put my finger on why it felt that way... I put it down to his acting!

I haven't quite gotten round to hearing voices in my head though....
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Old 13-02-2014, 16:45
jsmith99
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...........

For the second point, perhaps i didn't use the expression properly. To me a locked room mystery doesn't have to have a locked door. I meant that the entire mystery could be solved with clues contained in the room were the crime took place. The fact the minister was a gun smuggler wasn't discovered using clues in the murder room (he had removed them). It is a big game changer for knowing what kind of man he was and what he's capable of. Character psychology is an important factor for making assumptions that leads to other clues and then to a real theory. For me, it changed my entire perception of the victim, therefore, imo, not a locked room mystery. According to my perhaps incorrect use of the expression 'locked room mystery'.

It's certainly an unusual - in fact, unique - use of the phrase. I have never in my life heard the phrase used in that way, and I've been reading crime stories for nearly 60 years. Nor does Dr Fell mention that interpretation in his lecture on locked room mysteries in 'The Hollow Man', probably the greatest LRM ever.

To be honest, it sounds more like a puzzle or board game than something which could occur in real life, or even fill a novel. In the case of a puzzle or game, it could be one of the constraints that all the clues are in the murder room.

It could actually be used as the basis of a "Murder Mystery Weekend" type of event.
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Old 13-02-2014, 17:13
Wench02
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I wondered that. A few times, when Humphrey is speaking his lines, I thought that that was something that DI Poole would say. I even heard RP's/BM's voice in my head! Which means, I am hearing voices now...
I've only seen three episodes, and I have to admit, I have thought that the Humph seemed to be speaking the ways that Richard did, and he seems to pick up on the same small details that Richard did. (Admittedly I would hope a real detectives would; however in this instance it makes the characters too similar in a way.)

The new "forced" love interest with Camille, we had this with Richard, but it was not "forced" at all. Just seems a bit wishy washy too me. All they seem to have done is make Humph be disorganised, a bit more social than Richard, and write on napkins all the time, and hope that we haven't noticed Richard has vanished.
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Old 13-02-2014, 22:07
RoseAnne
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Really enjoyed this week's episode. I really like the new guy now.
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Old 13-02-2014, 22:39
carl.waring
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^ Me too. I tend to just "flick through" this thread now with all the over-analysis going on It's a TV show. Watch it or don't
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Old 13-02-2014, 22:44
marsch_labb
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How did Humph suss out the buried bag and know exactly where it was?
It didn't seem he knew exactly where it was.
It looked like Camille and the others had to wait quit a long time before Humphrey found it.
It had to be either in a straight line from the house (or path) to the beach or part of the bag was partially uncovered to find it again. It looked like the first one.
Perhaps a metal detector would have been more efficient if metal was present. They made that illogical call in the plot to bury the bag in advance instead of the minister bringing it with him when he planned to go. They could have added metal currency.
But it would have defeated the comedy purpose of the scene!
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Old 13-02-2014, 23:00
marsch_labb
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It's certainly an unusual - in fact, unique - use of the phrase. I have never in my life heard the phrase used in that way, and I've been reading crime stories for nearly 60 years. Nor does Dr Fell mention that interpretation in his lecture on locked room mysteries in 'The Hollow Man', probably the greatest LRM ever.

To be honest, it sounds more like a puzzle or board game than something which could occur in real life, or even fill a novel. In the case of a puzzle or game, it could be one of the constraints that all the clues are in the murder room.

It could actually be used as the basis of a "Murder Mystery Weekend" type of event.
Thanks for the info about Dr Fell, i'll have to check that.
I have read (and watched) a lot of mystery, but only a few years in English, It's not my first language so i'm not surprised i used the expression differently than what is accepted.
Having said that, i don't see why the way i envisionned it should not be used in a typical murder mystery. And i didn't say all the clues should be in the crime room; i said that the crime could be solved using only the clues in the room.
I will go with your definition but Wiki says about locked room mysteries 'the reader is normally presented with the puzzle and all of the clues'. So it seems there's no absolute consensus.
In the classic sens of the expression, where the door is locked, the best one i know is The Mystery of the Yellow Room by Gaston Leroux, who also wrote The Phantom of the Opera.

In fact, when i think about it, it was more than a locked room mystery since, in addition to clues, the murderer was also in the room when the body was discovered!
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Old 13-02-2014, 23:30
TheGrumpWizard
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It didn't seem he knew exactly where it was.
It looked like Camille and the others had to wait quit a long time before Humphrey found it.
It had to be either in a straight line from the house (or path) to the beach or part of the bag was partially uncovered to find it again. It looked like the first one.
Perhaps a metal detector would have been more efficient if metal was present. They made that illogical call in the plot to bury the bag in advance instead of the minister bringing it with him when he planned to go. They could have added metal currency.
But it would have defeated the comedy purpose of the scene!
Many thanks. I got sidelined during that bit and didn't catch it fully.
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Old 14-02-2014, 10:58
jsmith99
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..........
I have read (and watched) a lot of mystery, but only a few years in English, It's not my first language so i'm not surprised i used the expression differently than what is accepted............
Actually, you can't tell that it's not your first language.

.......Having said that, i don't see why the way i envisionned it should not be used in a typical murder mystery. And i didn't say all the clues should be in the crime room; i said that the crime could be solved using only the clues in the room.................
I see the distinction, but I wonder how the detective could be made aware of that? As I said, it would work in the context of a puzzle or game.

................
I will go with your definition but Wiki says about locked room mysteries 'the reader is normally presented with the puzzle and all of the clues'. So it seems there's no absolute consensus............
That may be an important element of a locked room mystery, but it's not essential. And it's very disappointing when the author doesn't give us all the information we need.

..........In the classic sens of the expression, where the door is locked, the best one i know is The Mystery of the Yellow Room by Gaston Leroux, who also wrote The Phantom of the Opera........
A real classic, but the master, for me, was John Dickson Car, who also wrote as carter Dickson. The greatest LRM ever has been judged to be "The Hollow Man" by JDC; you must find a copy and read it. Another very good writer of LRM was an american, Clayton Rawson.

...............In fact, when i think about it, it was more than a locked room mystery since, in addition to clues, the murderer was also in the room when the body was discovered!
Which is often used as a solution to LRM. Often by the killer hiding behind the door.

I think we should stop this, or we'll be accused of being off-topic. A heinous offence on DS, where all threads stick rigidly to the subject in the title.

Feel free to PM me if you've any questions on the subject.
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Old 14-02-2014, 15:25
kampffenhoff
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I thought it was the son as he looked nothing like either of his parents and I came up with this complicated theory about how he discovered his Father wasn't his Father and --- well, I won't go on because my theory was daft. I watch a lot of detective shows and never have the slightest idea who has done it and when I think I know I'm wrong.
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Old 14-02-2014, 15:31
RFS
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I thought it was the son as he looked nothing like either of his parents and I came up with this complicated theory about how he discovered his Father wasn't his Father and --- well, I won't go on because my theory was daft. I watch a lot of detective shows and never have the slightest idea who has done it and when I think I know I'm wrong.
I thought it was the son too but more because he was bloody annoying and for that reason alone I wanted him arrested!!!!
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Old 14-02-2014, 16:03
kampffenhoff
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I thought it was the son too but more because he was bloody annoying and for that reason alone I wanted him arrested!!!!
Yes he was annoying. Glad someone else thought he had done it.
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Old 14-02-2014, 16:25
Mikey_C
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Coming late to this, but I have to say I thought this week's episode was the best yet for this series. (I thought it was the Son too but I was well wrong.)

Also, good to see more focus on the other charecters as well now, am hoping they'll do an episode on Dwayne

Anyhow, good to see that DIP is doing so well, last week's episode (Consolidated) got over 8 Million viewers and The episode just gone narrowly lost out to Eastenders 7.22 vs DIP 7.19 for most watched program of the day.

With ratings like that the BBC would have to be absolute idiots not to renew it for season 4
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Old 14-02-2014, 16:34
RFS
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Well having done a more than passable impersonation of a drowned rat on the way to the post office today, this is my only reminder of what the sun looks like!!! Despite the change of lead, it is my weekly guilty pleasure of fun and froth with murder thrown in! What more could anyone ask
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:16
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Good evening. Anyone watching?

Don't trust the wife.
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:19
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:22
mazzy50
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Hmmm. Would fall into the previous week's patterns as well. Be interesting to see if you have worked it out already.
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:25
Eater Sundae
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For someone who has spent all his life on the island, the tour guide hides his accent well.
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:27
mazzy50
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For someone who has spent all his life on the island, the tour guide hides his accent well.
I wasn't paying attention. Is he really supposed to be a lifelong resident? If so that is terrible. You'd think he could at least have made a bit of an effort to suppress the Liverpool accent. I assumed he was meant to have come to the island to be a tour guide.
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:33
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:34
Eater Sundae
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Hmmm. Would fall into the previous week's patterns as well. Be interesting to see if you have worked it out already.
I wasn't paying attention. Is he really supposed to be a lifelong resident? If so that is terrible. You'd think he could at least have made a bit of an effort to suppress the Liverpool accent. I assumed he was meant to have come to the island to be a tour guide.
On the basis that Dwayne knows him and his background.
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:40
Hyram Fyram
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The acting is really bad this week, it's like a panto.
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:40
AngiBear
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Camille's date is Ross Kirk from Emmerdale, Paddy's cousin!

Captain Jack's accent is back!
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Old 18-02-2014, 21:43
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