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Old 29-01-2013, 18:26
Pull2Open
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I have a persian cat that isnvery well fed, groomed and is let out most days to roam the area and comes in, has some food and then sleeps.

What is really driving me insane right now is that, it will go out for an hour or two, have something to eat and then it will go upstairs, start meowing really loudly then will take a dump in the bath. My first reaction is to throw the cat back outside.

I really don't want to go to a litter tray because my other cat will meow at the door to be let out when it wants to do its business and I don't want that cat to start changing its habits. I also don't want a litter tray in the house.

The Persion is about 6!

What can I do, because I am on the verge of taking her to the cat protection league for rehoming!!
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Old 29-01-2013, 19:43
MarellaK
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I have a persian cat that isnvery well fed, groomed and is let out most days to roam the area and comes in, has some food and then sleeps.

What is really driving me insane right now is that, it will go out for an hour or two, have something to eat and then it will go upstairs, start meowing really loudly then will take a dump in the bath. My first reaction is to throw the cat back outside.

I really don't want to go to a litter tray because my other cat will meow at the door to be let out when it wants to do its business and I don't want that cat to start changing its habits. I also don't want a litter tray in the house.

The Persion is about 6!

What can I do, because I am on the verge of taking her to the cat protection league for rehoming!!
You need to provide a litter tray.

I didn't use a litter tray for years with my 2 cats and even when one of them died and I adopted another 2 the litter tray remained unused after the first few weeks. However, after last year's firework season one of my cats has reverted to using the litter tray (she's a fairly neurotic cat) while the other 2 continue to toilet outside with no problems. I have never admonished her for it though I am hopeful she will revert back to toileting outdoors again when the weather is better and she regains her confidence as we are all outside a lot more. Like yours, she does go outside for a wander but comes inside to toilet.

Something may have spooked your cat outside while she was doing her business and it is a basic necessity to provide her with an indoor toilet which she can use without being stressed. The other cat won't use it. I also provided indoor trays when my late Tabitha was dying and my other cat didn't touch them, I think he will always prefer to go outside.

Please don't consider re-homing! If your cat was ill you would need to keep her indoors. Litter trays really aren't so bad when only one cat is using it - the hooded versions are very good, I have one and most people who visit my house don't even realise that it's a litter tray.
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Old 29-01-2013, 19:54
bazaar1
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You feed her, keep her inside, she shouts, is ignored, then poos and your mad at her?

Cats (most animals) need to poo after a feed, why not feed her and then put her outside. It sounds like she is doing everything she can to warn you she needs to go.

Provide a litter tray, shut the bathroom door and put her out after feeding.
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:12
Pull2Open
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Of course!
keep her inside, .
Erm no...as I said in the OP, she goes out and roams around!
She goes upstairs and starts to meow as soon as she comes in, yes!
She is? Where did I say that?
then poos and your mad at her?
Yes I am because as I said in the OP, she does it right after coming in after a couple of hours and where there is ample opportunity! I think I'm entitled to be a bit p'd off!

In the morning, she is fed, goes out for an hour comes in has a sleep goes out for a couple of hours comes in is fed then goes and craps in the bath!

Not providing a dirty litter tray particularly with a 2 year old around and with another cat that will most probably revert back to litter tray when she doesn't need it now. Looks like she needs rehoming then!
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:26
Maisey Moo
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Sorry I hate too see it you don't deserve a cat at all. I rescue them and too say just because she poohs inside when you can't provide a litter tray. If she needs to go she will go. Has she seen a vet there could be something wrong medically.
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:28
husted
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Persians are indoor cats usually. I expect she has been trained to poo indoors. Typically, Persians are low energy and will display little interest in going out so make good indoor cats.

So it's no surprise she needs a litter tray really.
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:35
Pull2Open
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Persians are indoor cats usually. I expect she has been trained to poo indoors. Typically, Persians are low energy and will display little interest in going out so make good indoor cats.

So it's no surprise she needs a litter tray really.
Had her for 5 years and she only started this a few months ago...she always did her business outside before and is very much and out doors cat!

This is a change in habit and I am asking how to discourage it!
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:38
Susan_A1951
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OP - you don't say how long you have had her. If she has been going in the garden for six years or so - then probably something has scared her - perhaps another cat invading her territory?

I am not condemning you for not wanting a litter tray inside, especially if you have a routine that has lasted for years. But perhaps feeding your cat in the kitchen, shutting the door into the rest of the house - but leaving the garden door open?

But - if all else fails and she is really in distress, then you may need to provide a litter tray - at least for a while. You can get covered ones which are really quite hygenic. In the end - a cat is not a dog. Most dogs are happy to go out for their business, no matter what. Cats can be much more neurotic about their toilet habits.

Please give her a chance - cats who go through the rehoming process are often traumatised for life. Take a deep breath and look at alternatives - and any reasons for her behaviour.

And - this is tongue in cheek - promise. You have a two year old. Just wait until you are potty training - and the imaginative way in which way a toddler can spread the joy! lol
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:40
Pull2Open
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OP - you don't say how long you have had her. If she has been going in the garden for six years or so - then probably something has scared her - perhaps another cat invading her territory?

I am not condemning you for not wanting a litter tray inside, especially if you have a routine that has lasted for years. But perhaps feeding your cat in the kitchen, shutting the door into the rest of the house - but leaving the garden door open?

But - if all else fails and she is really in distress, then you may need to provide a litter tray - at least for a while. In the end - a cat is not a dog. Most dogs are happy to go out for their business, no matter what. Cats can be much more neurotic about their toilet habits.

Also - the recent weather may have made a difference.
Thank you, that is really constructive and the contents of your first para make a lot of sense and hadn't considered that!


We rescued her when she was a year old. She is a loved cat and she is given a lot of attention, this change in habit is causing quite a bit of stress in the house!
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:43
Susan_A1951
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Thank you, that is really constructive and the contents of your first para make a lot of sense and hadn't considered that!


We rescued her when she was a year old. She is a loved cat and she is given a lot of attention, this change in habit is causing quite a bit of stress in the house!
Cheers! BTW - I was editing my post when you answered - so sorry for any confusion. Good luck.
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:47
bazaar1
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Of course!

Erm no...as I said in the OP, she goes out and roams around!

She goes upstairs and starts to meow as soon as she comes in, yes!

She is? Where did I say that?

Yes I am because as I said in the OP, she does it right after coming in after a couple of hours and where there is ample opportunity! I think I'm entitled to be a bit p'd off!

In the morning, she is fed, goes out for an hour comes in has a sleep goes out for a couple of hours comes in is fed then goes and craps in the bath!

Not providing a dirty litter tray particularly with a 2 year old around and with another cat that will most probably revert back to litter tray when she doesn't need it now. Looks like she needs rehoming then!
You misunderstood my post. I understood that you let her out, but when she comes back in you feed her, then keep her in, that's when she needs to be outside. Instead you keep her I, she shouts to let you know she needs the loo (that's what the meows are for) and you obviously ignore her (otherwise you'd put her out then, not let her continue, then poo) so she has no choice but to poo in the house.

I cannot beleive people that have pets then are willing to dump them at the first sign of trouble, you wouldn't give your child up when he/she starts wetting the bed, would you? As for the not having a litter tray, I suggest you put it somewhere that is out of the toddlers reach, perhaps get a covered over one, and watch your child with it. Many people (myself included) manage young children and litter trays.

As I said, put the cat out after feeding if you are really that anti litter trays.
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:48
MarellaK
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Persians are indoor cats usually. I expect she has been trained to poo indoors. Typically, Persians are low energy and will display little interest in going out so make good indoor cats.

So it's no surprise she needs a litter tray really.
My mum's got a persian who's very much an outdoor cat! She's a very good hunter too.

As I said, I also have a cat who's taken to toileting indoors, in her litter tray, since the fireworks last November when I know she was in fear of her life. I am reasonably confident that she will eventually go outside again but I will probably have to wait for a change in the weather.

It's a shame that the OP is so set on rehoming her cat just because she won't provide a litter tray. If the cat was ever ill or injured it would need to be kept indoors so I can't understand the reluctance to provide a tray as a temporary solution until the cat regains its confidence.

As Maisey says, someone who would so easily give up their cat is probably not the right owner for that cat anyway.
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:52
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I can only echo Susan's excellent advice - though Maisey does have a point that there could be an underlying medical condition so you may want to have a vet check before rehoming if things don't improve.

If you do decide to rehome, there is a specialist Persian rescue - http://www.rushdenpersianrescue.co.uk/ - which would be much better than a generic rescue.
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:52
Maisey Moo
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Well she wouldn't like my house with my litter trays.
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:55
Pull2Open
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You misunderstood my post. I understood that you let her out, but when she comes back in you feed her, then keep her in, that's when she needs to be outside. Instead you keep her I, she shouts to let you know she needs the loo (that's what the meows are for) and you obviously ignore her (otherwise you'd put her out then, not let her continue, then poo) so she has no choice but to poo in the house.

I cannot beleive people that have pets then are willing to dump them at the first sign of trouble, you wouldn't give your child up when he/she starts wetting the bed, would you? As for the not having a litter tray, I suggest you put it somewhere that is out of the toddlers reach, perhaps get a covered over one, and watch your child with it. Many people (myself included) manage young children and litter trays.

As I said, put the cat out after feeding if you are really that anti litter trays.
I apologise for misunderstanding! She is not kept in after feeding, she feeds after being out for a couple of hours and after feeding she just takes herself upstairs.

You second para is not helpful and frankly makes a false assumption about me! I have had many pets and all have had their problems, I have never 'dumped' a pet but this particular problem is cause some particularly stressful situations in the house. Also to draw parallels with problems with a child is a little wierd!
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:58
Pull2Open
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I can only echo Susan's excellent advice - though Maisey does have a point that there could be an underlying medical condition so you may want to have a vet check before rehoming if things don't improve.

If you do decide to rehome, there is a specialist Persian rescue - http://www.rushdenpersianrescue.co.uk/ - which would be much better than a generic rescue.
Thanks for the link!

Though I hope it doesn't come to that!
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Old 29-01-2013, 20:58
Maisey Moo
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Like other have said feed her and then let her out
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Old 29-01-2013, 21:00
Lost_Soul
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Any change in behaviour could be caused by a medical condition..it could be that your cat is meowing and pooing in a different place because its causing her pain to go.

you'd rather rehome your cat than have a litter tray.....really!!!???

Edit... i used to have half persian who had trouble with constipation, he would meow when he had to go, in his case it was caused by a problem with his spine and his muscles weren't as strong as they were when he was younger but if your cat is long haired then hair balls can cause constipation.
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Old 29-01-2013, 21:00
husted
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My mum's got a persian who's very much an outdoor cat! She's a very good hunter too.

As I said, I also have a cat who's taken to toileting indoors, in her litter tray, since the fireworks last November when I know she was in fear of her life. I am reasonably confident that she will eventually go outside again but I will probably have to wait for a change in the weather.

It's a shame that the OP is so set on rehoming her cat just because she won't provide a litter tray. If the cat was ever ill or injured it would need to be kept indoors so I can't understand the reluctance to provide a tray as a temporary solution until the cat regains its confidence.

As Maisey says, someone who would so easily give up their cat is probably not the right owner for that cat anyway.
That's why I said typically and usually. It's not surprising for a typical usual Persian cat to poo indoors.
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Old 29-01-2013, 21:02
Pull2Open
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It's a shame that the OP is so set on rehoming her cat just because she won't provide a litter tray. If the cat was ever ill or injured it would need to be kept indoors so I can't understand the reluctance to provide a tray as a temporary solution until the cat regains its confidence.

As Maisey says, someone who would so easily give up their cat is probably not the right owner for that cat anyway.
Another assumption about my commitment to pets (and my gender - I'm male!)

If it was a medical condition then of course I would use a litter tray because it would be a temporary thingm, but it isn't its a behavioural change and I would prefer to train it out of her rather than going down the permanent litter tray route. I came on here for some advice in that respect. It seems that the first answer to these sorts of problems is always 'litter tray'!
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Old 29-01-2013, 21:04
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you'd rather rehome your cat than have a litter tray.....really!!!???
Its preferable to having a 2 year old sticking his fingers into it!
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Old 29-01-2013, 21:06
bazaar1
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I apologise for misunderstanding! She is not kept in after feeding, she feeds after being out for a couple of hours and after feeding she just takes herself upstairs.

You second para is not helpful and frankly makes a false assumption about me! I have had many pets and all have had their problems, I have never 'dumped' a pet but this particular problem is cause some particularly stressful situations in the house. Also to draw parallels with problems with a child is a little wierd!
I don't see why it is weird! A pet is adopted into a family, I would expect to have the same patience and adaptions made for my pets as I would for a child. Is it really too much to ask to put a litter tray out? If she's choosing to go upstairs then force here out straight after feeding.
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Old 29-01-2013, 21:06
bazaar1
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Its preferable to having a 2 year old sticking his fingers into it!
Watch your child then!
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Old 29-01-2013, 21:07
Lost_Soul
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Its preferable to having a 2 year old sticking his fingers into it!
no not really, many people live with both litter trays and kids, you really dont have to chose...would you rehome your child if the situation was reversed?
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Old 29-01-2013, 21:09
Pull2Open
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Watch your child then!
no not really, many people live with both litter trays and kids, you really dont have to chose...would you rehome your child if the situation was reversed?
On that note, I'm done...thanks for your advice!

I'll think twice before asking advice here again I'll just pm the non aggressive constructive people from this thread!
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