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Old 23-03-2013, 03:37
statesidefan
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Just came across this: tips for young writers, written by Dominic Minghella, published in The Guardian last month.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...ips?CMP=twt_gu
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Old 23-03-2013, 06:40
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Cool! Are these 3 minute eggs? Is this a typical English breakfast?

How clever that to do this with Guinness! Thanks SusieS
Typical--I might imagine so. Though when we were there touring Cornwall and the west country last year, and we stayed in B&B's, everyone offered the "full English breakfast" which consisted of an egg, English bacon, banger, fried tomato, fried mushrooms, sometimes baked beans, toast (white or brown), juice, coffee, or tea and often there was also cold cereal and fruit available, too. We had to start specifying what we wanted as it was just way too much otherwise.

And our friend there, only has tea and a bagel or some such for breakfast usually, if anything at all. So just like here, it varies by the person.
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Old 23-03-2013, 06:44
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Originally Posted by SusieSagitarius View Post
ReneeBird, please clarify for me. Your question is clear, but I have no idea how I'd go about answering it, since we have no one in the series that we know of who is a pharmacist. Or do you mean an actor that would take on the role? Help!
Oh, shoot. I didn't think that far ahead! I guess there's no new actor's name on the cast list for Series 6, is there?
Okay, so we won't do predictions on this. Thanks.
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Old 23-03-2013, 06:58
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Just came across this: tips for young writers, written by Dominic Minghella, published in The Guardian last month.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...ips?CMP=twt_gu
Thanks, Stateside. Love reading about good writing.
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Old 23-03-2013, 07:43
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This mixbook was put together in 2011 by Little Guinea, who used to post here regularly and even has something in fanfiction. All of the people who wrote notes are or were regular posters on the Forum. Little Guinea, otherwise known as Nicky, presented the book to Martin Clunes during filming of S5. I think she even spent a day with Molly Bolt, who is Ben Bolt's daughter and Phillipa Braithwaite's assistant.

Like so many other former post-ers, I hope she returns for S6.
I believe it was Molly Bolt who was the soloist at THE open air concert too...

What a talented family
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Old 23-03-2013, 11:57
statesidefan
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Thanks, Stateside. Love reading about good writing.
Me, too. I thought this snippet was particularly interesting if we apply it to the DM characters we know. "Create a journey for your character(s). Here's a basic technique. Take a character. Give her one desire, one thing that she wants. Find a way to say, in a sequence of pictures, what that desire is. Now put something in the way of the character and the desire. She wants a cup of tea? But there's no tea in the jar. How does she make the tea? Let's see her try. Make sure the viewer is going to care whether she succeeds or not. Then they will enjoy the trying. Then they will feel the frustration of failure. When your character finally fails or succeeds or, as these things often go, she settles on a secondary goal (a cup of fine coffee?) we should feel that she has learned something. At the least, your character should change in the story. She must not end as she began."
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Old 23-03-2013, 12:22
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Typical--I might imagine so. Though when we were there touring Cornwall and the west country last year, and we stayed in B&B's, everyone offered the "full English breakfast" which consisted of an egg, English bacon, banger, fried tomato, fried mushrooms, sometimes baked beans, toast (white or brown), juice, coffee, or tea and often there was also cold cereal and fruit available, too. We had to start specifying what we wanted as it was just way too much otherwise.

And our friend there, only has tea and a bagel or some such for breakfast usually, if anything at all. So just like here, it varies by the person.
I stayed at the Slipway hotel when I visited Port Isaac in 2011. They offered a varied breakfast, which is probably different from most places in England. Every morning they offered a fish dish, either salmon or another smoked fish. It was delicious and very creative cooking. I would highly recommend that hotel if you visit Port Isaac. A bonus was that Julie Graham stayed there, so I got to see her at breakfast! Also, it is known to be a good pub, and I saw Ben Bolt, Louis Jamison, Julie Graham, and some of the crew enjoying a pint. Ben Bolt and the crew stayed very late and were enjoying a few more pints. The crew were complaining about the actors' ability to perform some stunts. Ben defended them and said they were very experienced actors, and they would be able to do the stunts. I thought it was funny the crew were talking about the actors, as that has been my experience working with theatre techs. Some things are the same whether it's at a small theatre or a big show like this.

As an American, I have always thought of the Cornish as separate from the English, like the Scots or the Welsh. I visited a town in North Carolina that was settled by the Cornish. They still have pastie shops. I also know the Cornish were known to be good miners, but I can't remember where that is - maybe West Virginia? Anyway, my experience there was that the Cornish seemed to consider themselves more "English" than I expected.
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Old 23-03-2013, 12:25
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I stayed at the Slipway hotel when I visited Port Isaac in 2011. They offered a varied breakfast, which is probably different from most places in England. Every morning they offered a fish dish, either salmon or another smoked fish. It was delicious and very creative cooking. I would highly recommend that hotel if you visit Port Isaac. A bonus was that Julie Graham stayed there, so I got to see her at breakfast! Also, it is known to be a good pub, and I saw Ben Bolt, Louis Jamison, Julie Graham, and some of the crew enjoying a pint. Ben Bolt and the crew stayed very late and were enjoying a few more pints. The crew were complaining about the actors' ability to perform some stunts. Ben defended them and said they were very experienced actors, and they would be able to do the stunts. I thought it was funny the crew were talking about the actors, as that has been my experience working with theatre techs. Some things are the same whether it's at a small theatre or a big show like this.

As an American, I have always thought of the Cornish as separate from the English, like the Scots or the Welsh. I visited a town in North Carolina that was settled by the Cornish. They still have pastie shops. I also know the Cornish were known to be good miners, but I can't remember where that is - maybe West Virginia? Anyway, my experience there was that the Cornish seemed to consider themselves more "English" than I expected.
Believe it or not, we have pastie shops in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan -- one we have visited is in St. Ignace. There are worked-out mines up there. (Lots of Finns and Italians, too). I never thought about Cornish settling there, but maybe.
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Old 23-03-2013, 13:09
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Believe it or not, we have pastie shops in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan -- one we have visited is in St. Ignace. There are worked-out mines up there. (Lots of Finns and Italians, too). I never thought about Cornish settling there, but maybe.
And there is one just outside Wash., DC in Vienna, VA! http://www.purepasty.com/
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Old 23-03-2013, 13:10
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Believe it or not, we have pastie shops in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan -- one we have visited is in St. Ignace. There are worked-out mines up there. (Lots of Finns and Italians, too). I never thought about Cornish settling there, but maybe.
Here's the Wikipedia article about them:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornish_American
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Old 23-03-2013, 13:16
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Believe it or not, we have pastie shops in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan -- one we have visited is in St. Ignace. There are worked-out mines up there. (Lots of Finns and Italians, too). I never thought about Cornish settling there, but maybe.
I learned how to make pasties from my mom. Her family emigrated from northern Italy to Iron Mountain, Michigan in the early 1900's. The town was (at that time) chock full of Italians, English from Cornwall with some Finns tossed into the mix. There used to be a bakery there that made the best Italian breads and pasteries, too.

There were some Cornish folk up on the Iron Range of Minnesota, too. My grandfather moved there from Iron Mountain to teach music in the 1930's.
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Old 23-03-2013, 13:28
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Typical--I might imagine so. Though when we were there touring Cornwall and the west country last year, and we stayed in B&B's, everyone offered the "full English breakfast" which consisted of an egg, English bacon, banger, fried tomato, fried mushrooms, sometimes baked beans, toast (white or brown), juice, coffee, or tea and often there was also cold cereal and fruit available, too. We had to start specifying what we wanted as it was just way too much otherwise.

And our friend there, only has tea and a bagel or some such for breakfast usually, if anything at all. So just like here, it varies by the person.
That 'full English Breakfast' is generally known as a 'fry up'.
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Old 23-03-2013, 13:34
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I learned how to make pasties from my mom. Her family emigrated from northern Italy to Iron Mountain, Michigan in the early 1900's. The town was (at that time) chock full of Italians, English from Cornwall with some Finns tossed into the mix. There used to be a bakery there that made the best Italian breads and pasteries, too.

There were some Cornish folk up on the Iron Range of Minnesota, too. My grandfather moved there from Iron Mountain to teach music in the 1930's.
We used to travel through there quite regularly, both the Upper Peninsula and the Iron Range -- it was fun to look at the phone book and see all the Finnish names mixed with the Italians. I think the Italians built the railroads that transported the ore from the mines?
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Old 23-03-2013, 13:56
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We used to travel through there quite regularly, both the Upper Peninsula and the Iron Range -- it was fun to look at the phone book and see all the Finnish names mixed with the Italians. I think the Italians built the railroads that transported the ore from the mines?
My sister lives in the far western end of the UP. She is married to one of those Finns. Years ago I was visiting and my BIL was digging in the yard and ran across an old drain. All work stopped and they immediately had to build a sauna!

There are pasty shops all over the UP. I always thought it had mostly to do with the mines, but reading that Wikipedia article surprised me that there had been such a Cornish influx there. That explains the pasties I guess.
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Old 23-03-2013, 14:00
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This mixbook was put together in 2011 by Little Guinea, who used to post here regularly and even has something in fanfiction. All of the people who wrote notes are or were regular posters on the Forum. Little Guinea, otherwise known as Nicky, presented the book to Martin Clunes during filming of S5. I think she even spent a day with Molly Bolt, who is Ben Bolt's daughter and Phillipa Braithwaite's assistant.

Like so many other former post-ers, I hope she returns for S6.
Well, put me in my place!!! I still enjoyed reading the comments outside this forum. I will go back to lurking.
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Old 23-03-2013, 14:07
Shop Girl
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Typical--I might imagine so. Though when we were there touring Cornwall and the west country last year, and we stayed in B&B's, everyone offered the "full English breakfast" which consisted of an egg, English bacon, banger, fried tomato, fried mushrooms, sometimes baked beans, toast (white or brown), juice, coffee, or tea and often there was also cold cereal and fruit available, too. We had to start specifying what we wanted as it was just way too much otherwise.

And our friend there, only has tea and a bagel or some such for breakfast usually, if anything at all. So just like here, it varies by the person.
I've travelled through Ireland a couple of times staying mostly in B&Bs. Every one offered the "Full Irish Breakfast" which is identical to the "Full English" I was offered traveling in England. I think it is like going into a breakfast place here. I know I certainly don't have two eggs, bacon or sausage, hash browns, toast, juice and coffee or tea every morning.

Of course the full Irish and full English were SO good, I said yes most mornings - and don't forget the porridge! Paid for it on the scale when I returned home, but it was vacation and you only live once!
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Old 23-03-2013, 14:11
Shop Girl
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Me, too. I thought this snippet was particularly interesting if we apply it to the DM characters we know. "Create a journey for your character(s). Here's a basic technique. Take a character. Give her one desire, one thing that she wants. Find a way to say, in a sequence of pictures, what that desire is. Now put something in the way of the character and the desire. She wants a cup of tea? But there's no tea in the jar. How does she make the tea? Let's see her try. Make sure the viewer is going to care whether she succeeds or not. Then they will enjoy the trying. Then they will feel the frustration of failure. When your character finally fails or succeeds or, as these things often go, she settles on a secondary goal (a cup of fine coffee?) we should feel that she has learned something. At the least, your character should change in the story. She must not end as she began."
I caught that too and thought about what he may have meant in creating Martin Ellingham. His one desire? Being a surgeon again? The last sentence says maybe Dominic didn't want him to return to surgery, but to find meaning in his life elsewhere? As a husband and father perhaps?
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Old 23-03-2013, 14:48
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Well, put me in my place!!! I still enjoyed reading the comments outside this forum. I will go back to lurking.
Oh, no, no, please don't be offended. I'm so sorry -- didn't mean that at all -- just thought people might be interested in Nicky's story and a piece of Forum history. Over-pedantic of me but certainly not meant in any way to offend or to put you down. Truly sorry if it came off that way.
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Old 23-03-2013, 16:08
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Watching DM E3-S6 "the Two of Us." About 9 minutes in - after Martin and Louisa have officially become a couple -

Doc is coming out of his surgery cottage and Penhale tells him "Heard the news. I hope you'll both be very happy."

Martin replies, "I'm sure we will."

What was missing was the word TOGETHER!

God! They set us up! It was all part of the plan! The scripts are written so well, that seeds of later actions are planted well back and sometimes hidden... Marvelous.

(It's been a heck of week here and I really needed a Doc Martin fix...)
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Old 23-03-2013, 16:23
Shop Girl
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Watching DM E3-S6 "the Two of Us." About 9 minutes in - after Martin and Louisa have officially become a couple -

Doc is coming out of his surgery cottage and Penhale tells him "Heard the news. I hope you'll both be very happy."

Martin replies, "I'm sure we will."

What was missing was the word TOGETHER!

God! They set us up! It was all part of the plan! The scripts are written so well, that seeds of later actions are planted well back and sometimes hidden... Marvelous.

(It's been a heck of week here and I really needed a Doc Martin fix...)
You just wanted to watch the kiss on the balcony a few times (or a few dozen times - oops! )

But is anybody happy - together or apart? At least prior to the scene at the castle......

Hope next week is better for you.
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Old 23-03-2013, 16:43
dmbesotted
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Watching DM E3-S6 "the Two of Us." About 9 minutes in - after Martin and Louisa have officially become a couple -

Doc is coming out of his surgery cottage and Penhale tells him "Heard the news. I hope you'll both be very happy."

Martin replies, "I'm sure we will."

What was missing was the word TOGETHER!

God! They set us up! It was all part of the plan! The scripts are written so well, that seeds of later actions are planted well back and sometimes hidden... Marvelous.

(It's been a heck of week here and I really needed a Doc Martin fix...)
Rob - I was right there with you watching this - and even knowing what was going to happen in S4 and 5, I found a smile on my lips and a warm feeling in my heart for our lovers in this episode - the lowest of lows and the highest of highs.
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Old 23-03-2013, 16:45
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Oh, no, no, please don't be offended. I'm so sorry -- didn't mean that at all -- just thought people might be interested in Nicky's story and a piece of Forum history. Over-pedantic of me but certainly not meant in any way to offend or to put you down. Truly sorry if it came off that way.
All of us are colored by our own experiences. This also includes our views and perceptions of our beloved Doc Martin. It is interesting to read the forum and find those things that others see and feel , things that we might have missed or seen in a different light. Or even to find that indeed the kitchen did change each series and that others were also watching and wondering.

I came to the forum recently as Doc Martin came to my viewing market only recently so there will be discoveries for me and possibly others that are old to the old guard forum members. They are still a joy to find and the journey itself is fun. I look at all the links people post as some people are amazing detectives and their efforts enhance us all.

I have a couple of friends who watch DM but you on the forum are the only ones I have found who are so rabid and dedicated to the series and to Martin Clunes. Your love, lust, and obsession rounds out the experience.

Now is such a critical time for all of us, with new tales to tell, and the fate of our hero in the balance.
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Old 23-03-2013, 16:49
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Just came across this: tips for young writers, written by Dominic Minghella, published in The Guardian last month.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...ips?CMP=twt_gu
Lots of to the point simple information here and then a lot of snarky comments. Ahhh the world of anonymity.
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Old 23-03-2013, 16:56
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Believe it or not, we have pastie shops in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan -- one we have visited is in St. Ignace. There are worked-out mines up there. (Lots of Finns and Italians, too). I never thought about Cornish settling there, but maybe.
I first heard of pasties from reading "The Cat Who" series of stories by Lillian Jackson Braun, set in Moose County, 400 miles north of everywhere.
Hubby and I traveled to the UP this last year to visit Pictured Rocks National Seashore - and enjoyed our first pasties. Very satisfying and they are easy to transport.
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Old 23-03-2013, 17:38
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You just wanted to watch the kiss on the balcony a few times (or a few dozen times - oops! )

But is anybody happy - together or apart? At least prior to the scene at the castle......

Hope next week is better for you.
Maybe it was the blue jeans and her tight sweater... Did I say that? Now if that damn mobile had not have rung just then!

As for this week, an amazing conglomeration of little things and big things, Lady Luck and Fate having a field day. Plenty of adrenaline. But I have a warm cat on my lap while Martin plays doctor with Beth Sawle.
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