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Old 17-03-2013, 21:47
T.K. Mazin
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Hi,

Recently I decided to start from scratch again and re-formatted/cleaned my hard drive of all its clogged up memory. I then installed a fresh copy of Windows XP Professional on my HP NC8230 Notebook laptop. (XP seems to work best on this laptop ).

However, I have no bluetooth, printing or wireless internet capabilites due to the fact that I completely re-formatted the hard drive, deleting all the drivers along with it. I then went onto the HP website to check for HP NC8230 drivers and it gave me a list of all the drivers for Windows XP Professional.

But I'm not sure which drivers to install, because there is a lot of them covering different areas. Basically, I want to know which drivers would be recommended to install and which drivers are not neccassarily needed to install. Or am I suppose to install all of them?
(Here's the HP website: http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport...&swEnvOID=1093)

I'm not sure if anyone here can help, but I thought I should post this in case there is someone else out there who had a similar issue to me in downloading the right drivers. Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks.
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Old 17-03-2013, 22:00
Stig
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Start with the wireless network drivers, and some drivers might get picked up by Windows Update anyway.
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Old 17-03-2013, 22:12
T.K. Mazin
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Okay, I'll download and install all 8 network drivers on the laptop. What about the 2 modem drivers?
Thanks for the reply.
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Old 17-03-2013, 22:19
c4rv
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No, if you are using wireless then start with intel pro wireless and if that does not work then broadcom wireless v6.10a should do.

For bluetooth, try the second one in the list and for your printer, you will need to go to the printer manufacture website.
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Old 17-03-2013, 22:22
LION8TIGER
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As above ^^.
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Old 17-03-2013, 22:26
joshua_welby
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Hi,

Recently I decided to start from scratch again and re-formatted/cleaned my hard drive of all its clogged up memory. I then installed a fresh copy of Windows XP Professional on my HP NC8230 Notebook laptop. (XP seems to work best on this laptop ).

However, I have no bluetooth, printing or wireless internet capabilites due to the fact that I completely re-formatted the hard drive, deleting all the drivers along with it. I then went onto the HP website to check for HP NC8230 drivers and it gave me a list of all the drivers for Windows XP Professional.

But I'm not sure which drivers to install, because there is a lot of them covering different areas. Basically, I want to know which drivers would be recommended to install and which drivers are not neccassarily needed to install. Or am I suppose to install all of them?
(Here's the HP website: http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport...&swEnvOID=1093)

I'm not sure if anyone here can help, but I thought I should post this in case there is someone else out there who had a similar issue to me in downloading the right drivers. Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks.
First download the Sounblaster Drivers so that you can get sound out of your PC/Laptop

Then download the Driver Checker below

I use TechTracker from the CNet website to keep my Drivers up to date www.cnet.com/
Here is the direct Link to it http://download.cnet.com/CNET-TechTr...-10912909.html
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Old 17-03-2013, 23:01
T.K. Mazin
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No, if you are using wireless then start with intel pro wireless and if that does not work then broadcom wireless v6.10a should do.

For bluetooth, try the second one in the list and for your printer, you will need to go to the printer manufacture website.
Oh okay, so I just install two Network drivers: "Intel PRO/Wireless Drivers" and "Software Support for HP Integrated Module with Bluetooth Wireless Technology".

And if IntelPRO don't work, I go for Broadcom Wireless LAN Driver (v6.10a).
I will try that now.

Thank you. Much appreciated .
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Old 17-03-2013, 23:05
T.K. Mazin
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First download the Sounblaster Drivers so that you can get sound out of your PC/Laptop

Then download the Driver Checker below

I use TechTracker from the CNet website to keep my Drivers up to date www.cnet.com/
Here is the direct Link to it http://download.cnet.com/CNET-TechTr...-10912909.html
Sounblaster Drivers? Do you mean the "ADI SoundMAX Audio Driver" on the Audio Driver section?
Apologies, I'm a bit of a novice when it comes to drivers and stuff.

Ah, thank you for the Tech Tracker. That's great. I'll download that now too.
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Old 17-03-2013, 23:09
T.K. Mazin
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I'm also wondering if I should download the "ATI Video Driver and Control Panel" Graphic Driver as I think I remember having that installed before I re-formatted my hard drive. That would be needed for gaming, wouldn't it?

And what about the Storage Drivers for Media Card Readers? I think I would need that for using my media cards.

I will wait for confirmation from you guys before I proceed .


Any other drivers I should install?

Thank you for all the help by the way. It's good getting help from people who obviously know their stuff.
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Old 18-03-2013, 00:01
Helmut10
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You should have downloaded Hardware Drivers before doing such things, and stored them on a CD/DVD USB key etc.
You now know, so burn a Drivers Disc. Windows XP service packs etc.

Going down the list, ignoring less useful Drossware, and older drivers:
ADI soundMax Audio Driver.
ATI Video Driver.
Synaptics Touchpad driver.
Intel Pro Wireless drivers.
HP integrated Blue tooth.
Broadcom Wireless LAN driver.
Intel Chipset Installation utility.

Download the printer driver from the Printer manufacturers website.

There are some others like the Card Reader etc which are less important, do those at your leisure.

There's a lot of HP Drossware you need not bother with at all.
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Old 18-03-2013, 01:21
T.K. Mazin
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You should have downloaded Hardware Drivers before doing such things, and stored them on a CD/DVD USB key etc.
You now know, so burn a Drivers Disc. Windows XP service packs etc.

Going down the list, ignoring less useful Drossware, and older drivers:
ADI soundMax Audio Driver.
ATI Video Driver.
Synaptics Touchpad driver.
Intel Pro Wireless drivers.
HP integrated Blue tooth.
Broadcom Wireless LAN driver.
Intel Chipset Installation utility.

Download the printer driver from the Printer manufacturers website.

There are some others like the Card Reader etc which are less important, do those at your leisure.

There's a lot of HP Drossware you need not bother with at all.
Ah, thank you for the list. That helps. I actually haven't installed any drivers just yet as I wanted to get full confirmation of all the drivers required to download, which I now have .
I'll install the drivers in the following order: Hardware, Audio, Graphics, Network and then Storage.

I'll check for the HP printer driver after I've installed all of those drivers.

Yes, I've saved all the download files on a USB drive in case I have to re-format the laptop in the future.

Yep, there is indeed a lot of Drossware. That's why I wanted to know which drivers are necessary to install and which ones are not really needed.

Thanks for the reply.
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Old 18-03-2013, 06:53
Sambda
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In general, put on the more basic drivers first, the whistles-and-bells drivers later. Chipset INF and video drivers should go on earlier, for example, than, say, Synaptics Touchpad.

One good tip is to go into Device Manager (after you have done the basic OS install + Service Packs) and work down the unknown entries and seek to get rid of them all (in order of basicness, as I have described). Don't do it arse upwards by worrying about putting on every last bit of crap HP has listed on their site - put on the minimum you need to get the thing working.

Once you have a nice, tidy Device Manager (no unknown entries), simply use the PC as normal till you become aware of something that you might need the extra HP stuff for. These might include managing docking, managing battery use, providing functionality for strange keys on the keyboard etc.

Also, even with a tidy Device Manager, other third-party drivers (non-HP, in your case) may provide extra functionality over what Windows itself has installed. For example, a manufacturer's own printer drivers might give you e.g. two-up or double-sided printing.

The above methodology has kept me safe thru 20 years of making up disk images for a large London Uni.
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Old 18-03-2013, 20:38
T.K. Mazin
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In general, put on the more basic drivers first, the whistles-and-bells drivers later. Chipset INF and video drivers should go on earlier, for example, than, say, Synaptics Touchpad.

One good tip is to go into Device Manager (after you have done the basic OS install + Service Packs) and work down the unknown entries and seek to get rid of them all (in order of basicness, as I have described). Don't do it arse upwards by worrying about putting on every last bit of crap HP has listed on their site - put on the minimum you need to get the thing working.

Once you have a nice, tidy Device Manager (no unknown entries), simply use the PC as normal till you become aware of something that you might need the extra HP stuff for. These might include managing docking, managing battery use, providing functionality for strange keys on the keyboard etc.

Also, even with a tidy Device Manager, other third-party drivers (non-HP, in your case) may provide extra functionality over what Windows itself has installed. For example, a manufacturer's own printer drivers might give you e.g. two-up or double-sided printing.

The above methodology has kept me safe thru 20 years of making up disk images for a large London Uni.
Thanks for the tips. So do you think the order I'm installing the drivers is okay?

Which one is the Chipset INF? Are you talking about the Modem Drivers? Or the OP Enhancements and QFEs? If so, I thought I'm not suppose to install the modem drivers 'cause I'm using a wireless internet?
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Old 19-03-2013, 01:26
Sambda
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Thanks for the tips. So do you think the order I'm installing the drivers is okay?

Which one is the Chipset INF? Are you talking about the Modem Drivers? Or the OP Enhancements and QFEs? If so, I thought I'm not suppose to install the modem drivers 'cause I'm using a wireless internet?
Little lesson first..

A chipset is the set of CPU-support chips on the motherboard. Chip groupings on a motherboard consist of a 1) CPU, 2) support chips to carry out the main task of different bits of the architecture talking to each other (some main ones are the North Bridge and South Bridge, and controller/s for hard drives) and 3) third-party add-on chips controlling all the "extra value" bits like sound, network etc.

The support chips (2) come as a set, all made by the same person - one big maker is Intel. The third-party chips are usually made by a manufacturer who specialises in that functionality (say Conexant for modem chips, or Sigmatel for sound; Texas Instruments seem to make a lot of PCMCIA/Cardbus controllers etc.). The motherboard manufacturer decides on which CPU/s to support on their M/B, selects the chipset they are going to use to support the CPU, and then, in a bit more of an ad-hoc fashion, picks all the little chips for all those extra bits and pieces. They solder them all together and you have your finished motherboard!

Windows always puts *something* on so the chipset will basically work (othewise the whole PC won't work). The MS stuff may not be optimised, however. If you look under "System Devices" (in Device Manager) once you have put on the OS, if you see multiple unknown/"!" entries, then that is usually a sign to explicitly put on a chipset driver. This is usually more of an issue if the OS you are putting on is significantly older than the hardware (e.g. putting XP on a new machine). The chipset driver HP lists on their site will be fine to use as the PC OEMs rarely alter much/anything from what the chipset manufacturer (Intel or whoever) supplies anyhow.

Certainly try to get that "System Devices" bit of Device Manager looking neat and tidy before you move onto the drivers for all the other stuff. Sometimes you get dependencies, such as an audio driver or something not working until all is OK with the basics.

My sort of order for things on a new PC would be something *like* the following, but this is not set in stone, just a general guide...

OS
Service pack/s
Windows updates
Chipset, if needed
Display drivers (and set them to right resolution etc.)
whatever networking
other crap (sound, modem, touchpad, cardbus controller, printer/s, scanner etc. etc.)
When all in Dev Manager looks good, move onto your apps (Office et al), doing service packs and updates for each after the installation of the basic app.

For various reasons, Bluetooth stacks can be a bitch - get that on early (as part of the "whatever networking" bit) in case you need to start again.

Putting on drivers really has nothing much to do with whether you plan to use that facility or not. You shouldn't not put on modem drivers because you are going to use wireless or Ethernet or whatever - they shouldn't interfere with each other. If you don't put on (e.g.) modem drivers, you won't get the satisfaction of a nice clean Device Manger, as I mentioned, and, you never know, you might want them one day in an emergency!

If you *really* don't want to put drivers for something on, and don't want to be bugged by missing entries in Device Manger, then you can usually turn off some of the onboard bits and bobs in the BIOS - then the OS won't even *see* them.
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Old 19-03-2013, 02:31
Sambda
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Oh okay, so I just install two Network drivers: "Intel PRO/Wireless Drivers" and "Software Support for HP Integrated Module with Bluetooth Wireless Technology".

And if IntelPRO don't work, I go for Broadcom Wireless LAN Driver (v6.10a).
Just a note on this ^^^^. Maybe I am misunderstanding and insulting your intelligence, but just to make sure...

The "Intel PRO/Wireless" and "Broadcom Wireless LAN" will be alternatives (and your mention of Bluetooth is something different completely). Sometimes on the PC manufacturer's websites, they list together drivers which have been used on different models of the same basic PC. Either you will have the model which used the Intel wireless or the Broadcom, not both. If you put in some sort of service tag from your PC, it might magically narrow the field down to just one of them.

If you need to reinstall a PC, always write down (or grab) the contents of the device manager before formatting, then you'll know in situations like this.
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:03
T.K. Mazin
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Just a note on this ^^^^. Maybe I am misunderstanding and insulting your intelligence, but just to make sure...

The "Intel PRO/Wireless" and "Broadcom Wireless LAN" will be alternatives (and your mention of Bluetooth is something different completely). Sometimes on the PC manufacturer's websites, they list together drivers which have been used on different models of the same basic PC. Either you will have the model which used the Intel wireless or the Broadcom, not both. If you put in some sort of service tag from your PC, it might magically narrow the field down to just one of them.

If you need to reinstall a PC, always write down (or grab) the contents of the device manager before formatting, then you'll know in situations like this.
No, it's okay.

But yes, I understood what the previous poster meant in regards to Broadcom being an alternative to IntelPRO if that doesn't work. Just a minor question, but would there be any issues if I installed both of them? Or is it better if I installed one or the other?

The Bluetooth driver is obviously a seperate thing.

Yeah, at the time when I decided to re-format the hard drive, I actually couldn't get access to my Device Manager as the computer was paralyzed due to some sort of corruption. So unfortunately, I wasn't able to write down the driver names.

Thanks for all the help and tips. Appreciate it.
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:08
T.K. Mazin
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Little lesson first..

A chipset is the set of CPU-support chips on the motherboard. Chip groupings on a motherboard consist of a 1) CPU, 2) support chips to carry out the main task of different bits of the architecture talking to each other (some main ones are the North Bridge and South Bridge, and controller/s for hard drives) and 3) third-party add-on chips controlling all the "extra value" bits like sound, network etc.

The support chips (2) come as a set, all made by the same person - one big maker is Intel. The third-party chips are usually made by a manufacturer who specialises in that functionality (say Conexant for modem chips, or Sigmatel for sound; Texas Instruments seem to make a lot of PCMCIA/Cardbus controllers etc.). The motherboard manufacturer decides on which CPU/s to support on their M/B, selects the chipset they are going to use to support the CPU, and then, in a bit more of an ad-hoc fashion, picks all the little chips for all those extra bits and pieces. They solder them all together and you have your finished motherboard!

Windows always puts *something* on so the chipset will basically work (othewise the whole PC won't work). The MS stuff may not be optimised, however. If you look under "System Devices" (in Device Manager) once you have put on the OS, if you see multiple unknown/"!" entries, then that is usually a sign to explicitly put on a chipset driver. This is usually more of an issue if the OS you are putting on is significantly older than the hardware (e.g. putting XP on a new machine). The chipset driver HP lists on their site will be fine to use as the PC OEMs rarely alter much/anything from what the chipset manufacturer (Intel or whoever) supplies anyhow.

Certainly try to get that "System Devices" bit of Device Manager looking neat and tidy before you move onto the drivers for all the other stuff. Sometimes you get dependencies, such as an audio driver or something not working until all is OK with the basics.

My sort of order for things on a new PC would be something *like* the following, but this is not set in stone, just a general guide...

OS
Service pack/s
Windows updates
Chipset, if needed
Display drivers (and set them to right resolution etc.)
whatever networking
other crap (sound, modem, touchpad, cardbus controller, printer/s, scanner etc. etc.)
When all in Dev Manager looks good, move onto your apps (Office et al), doing service packs and updates for each after the installation of the basic app.

For various reasons, Bluetooth stacks can be a bitch - get that on early (as part of the "whatever networking" bit) in case you need to start again.

Putting on drivers really has nothing much to do with whether you plan to use that facility or not. You shouldn't not put on modem drivers because you are going to use wireless or Ethernet or whatever - they shouldn't interfere with each other. If you don't put on (e.g.) modem drivers, you won't get the satisfaction of a nice clean Device Manger, as I mentioned, and, you never know, you might want them one day in an emergency!

If you *really* don't want to put drivers for something on, and don't want to be bugged by missing entries in Device Manger, then you can usually turn off some of the onboard bits and bobs in the BIOS - then the OS won't even *see* them.
Wow, very informative. Thanks for this. I'm assuming you're talking about the "Intel Chipset Installation Utility" on the OP Enhancements and QFEs section?

What happens if you leave some of the missing entries in Device Manager? Does it create any issues/problems in the computer? Does it have to be clean?
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:16
Sambda
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Wow, very informative. Thanks for this.

What happens if you leave some of the missing entries in Device Manager? Does it create any issues/problems in the computer?
Not other than with the device in question, generally no.
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:17
Sambda
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Wow, very informative. Thanks for this. I'm assuming you're talking about the "Intel Chipset Installation Utility" on the OP Enhancements and QFEs section?
Sounds like the right thing, yes.
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:19
T.K. Mazin
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Not other than with the device in question, no.
Okay, thanks. You're like a human wikpedia with all that information . Honestly, thanks a lot.
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:22
T.K. Mazin
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Sounds like the right thing, yes.
Cool .

And thanks to everyone else on this thread. Very helpful.
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:28
Sambda
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Okay, thanks. You're like a human wikpedia with all that information . Honestly, thanks a lot.
No probs.

With your network "Intel" or "Broadcom" stuff, it is far better to try the right driver straight off. Most of the time, if you install the wrong one, you'll just get an error and the device in question won't work. You can then do a Add/remove programs (if applicable) and re-try the right one.

Having said that, I have known times when putting the wrong stuff on has completely frigged things, even when subsequently putting the right drivers on afterwards.

I used to deal a lot with MSI motherboards. These buggers would change their audio chips willy nilly even on boards of the same model number. I remember that putting the wrong sound drivers on there messed the sound up completely - no way would it work subsequently - and you'd need a complete reinstall. I used to take the lid off and look for the actual chip to find out the right drivers (sound chips are usually good for having meaningful stuff stamped on them).
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:47
T.K. Mazin
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No probs.

With your network "Intel" or "Broadcom" stuff, it is far better to try the right driver straight off. Most of the time, if you install the wrong one, you'll just get an error and the device in question won't work. You can then do a Add/remove programs (if applicable) and re-try the right one.

Having said that, I have known times when putting the wrong stuff on has completely frigged things, even when subsequently putting the right drivers on afterwards.

I used to deal a lot with MSI motherboards. These buggers would change their audio chips willy nilly even on boards of the same model number. I remember that putting the wrong sound drivers on there messed the sound up completely - no way would it work subsequently - and you'd need a complete reinstall. I used to take the lid off and look for the actual chip to find out the right drivers (sound chips are usually good for having meaningful stuff stamped on them).
I see. Hopefully, that won't happen to me.

So if IntelPRO works, should I not bother with installing Broadcom? I think I had them both installed before I re-formatted the hard drive.
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Old 19-03-2013, 03:55
Sambda
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I see. Hopefully, that won't happen to me.

So if IntelPRO works, should I not bother with installing Broadcom? I think I had them both installed before I re-formatted the hard drive.
Assuming they're both actually wireless drivers, as you said (and, say, one isn't for wireless and one for wired), then no - you just need the one that works. Unless your PC actually has two wireless adapters on it, but that would be extremely unusual!

If the machine is a laptop, it could really only have two wireless adapters by having one of them as a cardbus/PCMCIA card (i.e. in one of the slots), with the other being built in (one of those third-party chips on the MB I mentioned).
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