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Old 31-03-2013, 08:35
PJ68
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a lot of people my age (mid 40s) remember the same things from classic who as a child - the most abiding one being the sea devils rising out of the sea. when i think back it is ALWAYS the monsters i saw as a child that i remember, not the plots etc.

in 20/30 years who do you think the very young children watching it now will remember?

or will that not happen seeing as they'll be able to watch their episodes whenever they want..? i think i only remember these so well as i only saw them once, at a very impressionable age, and they stuck with me..
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Old 31-03-2013, 08:38
PJ68
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-YbsiU9bUY
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Old 31-03-2013, 08:39
fallucas
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A combination of the two, obviously they (and not just them everyone) can watch them whenever they like which is amazing. But there will always be scenes shots and sequences that will stick in your mind.

To name but two I think the Dalek in chains (not an all Dalek Alice in Chains cover band) in the episode Dalek is quite memorable imagery as is any time they do a grand reveal of a new TARDIS interior.
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Old 31-03-2013, 08:43
Muttley76
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From my childhood, the moment that always stuck in my mind was the spinning heads from Davison's Doctors regeneration... I still think that is very effective even now.
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Old 31-03-2013, 08:54
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The Jagaroth/Scarlioni reveal and Magnus Greal's real face!

From Nu Who, it was the Derek Jacobi Master realisation, which had me whooping round the living room!
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Old 31-03-2013, 09:00
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Love the microphone/boom gaff at 1:38 bottom left!
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Old 31-03-2013, 09:00
fallucas
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Oh a good one for me from Nu Who is the revelation in the series 5 finale that the missing coat wasn't a continuity error, but thats more a personal thing to me because friends and family members jestingly teased me about believing what they thought was a continuity/production error was in fact done on purpose. It was nice to be right if just once.
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Old 31-03-2013, 12:13
ShootyDogThing
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To name but two I think the Dalek in chains (not an all Dalek Alice in Chains cover band) in the episode Dalek is quite memorable
I feel like someone should make that a cover band now!

But yeah, I was going to say this scene; it was the first time I'd seen a Dalek on screen and everything about the scene is just perfect (the lighting, directing, dialogue, etc). I thought the similar scene with Dalek-Clara in AotD was also particularly effective (although I think we know now that chains are really not good at restraining Daleks...).

I'd also say the Master's reveal in Utopia for the same reasons, and both the speech and last scene in The Pandorica opens are really great. There's probably loads of others, but these scenes stayed with me the most.
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Old 31-03-2013, 12:35
TheSilentFez
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As a 10 year old, one of the most exciting moments on television ever was the Cult of Skaro emerging from the void ship at the end of Army of Ghosts.
I'm not as fond of those episodes as I was then, but they still aren't bad.

The Master reveal at the end of Utopia, however, still remains one of the best and most memorable moments for me.
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Old 31-03-2013, 12:40
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One of my earliest childhood memories is the robot mummies chasing the fourth Doctor and Sarah through the woods in Pyramids of Mars. Very scary and it's always stayed with me.
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Old 31-03-2013, 12:46
Pull2Open
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One of my earliest childhood memories is the robot mummies chasing the fourth Doctor and Sarah through the woods in Pyramids of Mars. Very scary and it's always stayed with me.
Yes yes yes...you just jogged a memory for me, sitting in my Grandads front room watching exactly that scene! I must have been about 8 or 9!

My earliest proper memory is the Tardis falling off a cliff in the Curse of Peladon!
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Old 31-03-2013, 12:47
ShootyDogThing
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As a 10 year old, one of the most exciting moments on television ever was the Cult of Skaro emerging from the void ship at the end of Army of Ghosts.
I'm not as fond of those episodes as I was then, but they still aren't bad.
That bit too! I had no idea the Daleks were coming back, and I was freaking out when they emerged!
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Old 31-03-2013, 15:39
SillyBillyGoat
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Two scenes concerning Yvonne Hartman in "Doomsday" always stuck with me.

The first is when she's taken to be cyber-converted. When you hear the saws and her screams of agony, and see the sparks flying ... I just remember finding it really disturbing.

The next was Cyber-Yvonne fighting back against the Cybermen, repeating her final words over and over "I did my duty for Queen and country, I did my duty for Queen and country", and then a tear falls from her eye. It gave me chills.
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Old 31-03-2013, 16:11
Abomination
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SCENES THAT STAYED WITH ME

Rose defeating the Daleks in The Parting of the Ways. That whole sequence from the yellow truck on The Powell Estate, through to the final showdown with Rose storming back to The Game Station was epic and meaningful in a way that no series finale has managed to match since. The quote on the DVD case sums it up perfectly..."if you have hairs on the back of your neck, prepare for them to stand erect".

The death of Reinette in The Girl in the Fireplace was a key moment in what was for me, an overrated episode. It was beautiful, but zany...in a way that the Moffat era would one day make me feel - a little style over substance at times. But this scene is just right, casting aside the relationship of The Doctor and Rose (which has lost its sweet, platonic edge since Eccleston had left) and giving a tragic, but loving closure to a brilliant character.

The reveal of The Beast in The Satan Pit. This two parter was filled with clever, philosophical and theological scenes with immense power, and it's a shame the show hasn't delved into such matters with such a serious edge since. The Beast was a fantastically designed adversary, and it's ultimate mystery identity not being revealed gives it a haunting mark that I don't think will be matched.

The death of the Racnoss children in The Runaway Bride. This is one example I think I'm giving, just because it is so well acted. It was one of the first times I felt I could truly commend David Tennant, and it actually delivered a very viable reason for why Donna wouldn't want to travel in the TARDIS - a first in my opinion...how could anyone turn down an offer to travel in time and space?! But the show was stolen by Sarah Parish as The Racnoss herself, who delivered a scene that was borderline distressing. You can hide it behind CGI and a giant spider facade, but her screams for her dying children was an underrated dark scene for Doctor Who that for most I think went unnoticed or has been forgotten.

The hymn in Gridlock. I'm not a religious person, and I never will be. But I find something fascinating and hauntingly beautiful when a sci-fi show manages to successfully embed religion into its plot (something I first grew to love in The X Files). Doctor Who doesn't do it often, and it does it well even less often than that. But this brief digression from the main plot where the supporting cast sing The Old Rugged Cross was a timeless moment for me.

The reveal of The Master in Utopia. I hadn't seen it coming, as this episode was kept quite secret before it was aired. It wasn't just the reveal - having not seen Classic Who at all at the time, The Master was a name that didn't resonate very much with me - it was the way it was done. Perfectly timed, perfectly acted, and the only example where I'll commend the direction in particular. The camera work was the most cinematic of the RTD era here, even the lighting on the TARDIS exterior was dark and foreboding. It's not the usual things I'd notice or comment on, but this was a well constructed scene, even if I would have Jacobi over Simm a thousand times over - the childish maniac that Simm brought to the stage at the end was a little in conflict with the dark, mature content that had come before it.

The appearance of Rose at the end of Partners in Crime was a shock to me, and one that I know sent loads of people reeling with theories. For the first and possibly only time in Nu-Who, it was common even for general viewers to be pondering the plot and fixating on it whilst the show wasn't on the air. It was the talk of the office, the talk of the playground etc.

The death of River Song in Forest of the Dead is a weird scene in that it has only become poignant in the years since it aired. It was always sad, but poignancy came as River returned in Series 5, 6 and 7. All of her appearances since are actually all leading her to that last encounter with The Tenth Doctor and Donna.

There were so many notable scenes from The Stolen Earth and Journey's End that were worth remembering, but the easiest of the bunch is surely the 'towing Earth home' scene which included the main faces of the RTD era in what was the only gathering. It was cheesy, it was sentimental... but that's always where RTD shone brightest.

I thought very little of the specials, as a lot of people did. For me, none of them were particularly strong, but all of them had either the odd strong scene or a fantastic actor to carry them through. The regeneration of the Tenth Doctor in The End of Time: Part Two is a scene that stayed with me... aside from my utter disdain for his final words, and the fact they missed a trick to refer to the Ninth Doctor which will bother me with every viewing, it was beautifully put together and one last over-the-top moment from RTD and Tennant.

The closing scenes from The Beast Below were poignant, and at the time relevant as well. The episode as a whole was a grower on me, and I liked it much more with repeated viewings. The score stood out here, and was actually used for Amy's Last Farewell too. The acting was perfect as well, and set up the sort of relationship The Doctor and Amy would have.

The term 'love letter' describes the end of Vincent and the Doctor perfectly. I don't know how much of it was Richard Curtis' writing, and how much of it was Bill Nighy 'acting', but it was one of the most real and down-to-Earth moments that Nu-Who has pulled off. It also had the guts not to shy away from the bipolar depression that Vincent had, and was absolutely beautiful. The episode as a whole is a classic, but this closing scene sealed it as something quite special.

A personal favourite, A Christmas Carol was the most emotional storyline I've ever seen from one-episode characters. It was well acted, well directed, and looked amazing - like something out of a Terry Pratchett book. I still concur it is the best looking episode of Doctor Who ever. The climatic song was a special moment, and Michael Gambon's dialogue-free acting was amazing here. The look of happiness when he sees the carriage behind the TARDIS was a heart-warming if bittersweet moment.

The Doctor and the TARDIS having a conversation sounds like something from a fanfiction nightmare. In most cases it probably would be, and it took the genius of Neil Gaiman to pull it off in The Doctor's Wife before I was convinced it could work. The 'Hello' scene at the end was not only typical timey-wimey style Moffat-era Who, it was all of that with a sense of poetry, beauty, craft and meaning. Suranne Jones stole the show, and Matt Smith delivered one of his only convincing emotional scenes - but he did so with style.

The close of The Girl Who Waited was special for a number of reasons, and one of the only times I've really liked Rory. Having tried to embrace the Doctor's world and lifestyle for the sake of his wife, it all came shattering around him when faced with a desperate version of his wife whom he had to allow to die. It was tragic, and the episode carried it through to the very end. Some of the best Doctor Who is when it isn't left on a lighter note - bittersweet Who is the best, as has been proven by the likes of Midnight, Vincent and the Doctor, A Christmas Carol and this episode in particular.

Amy's Choice was a great episode, but it felt a bit like Amy was making her choice without thinking it through entirely seriously. But as she puts it in The Angels Take Manhattan, it's "money where your mouth is time", and she has to make a choice between The Doctor and Rory again. This time it has severe repercussions, and it was very well acted by all concerned. At the same time, it highlights my problem with Series 7 - the scene wasn't as poignant or effective as Rose or Donna's exits... it had no time to linger or breathe. The exit from the graveyard was too rushed, and I wish it had had a bit longer to work its emotional charm.
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Old 03-04-2013, 20:22
Whovian1109
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I know it's already been said many a time, but the end of Utopia for me is as good as Doctor Who gets, an absolutely stunning fifteen minutes of television.
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Old 03-04-2013, 20:26
inspector drake
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The Doctor and crew cornered by the Gas Mask people in The Empty Child cliffhanger.
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Old 03-04-2013, 20:27
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Tom regenerating into Peter in Logopolis.
End of episode 3 of The Deadly Assassin.
Peri's cleavage in the regeneration scene in The Caves of Andozani.
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Old 03-04-2013, 20:29
TEDR
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From my childhood, probably that guy melting in Dragonfire and Ace attacking the Dalek in Remembrance.

What would people be likely to remember from now? I guess the Doctor being killed at Lake Silencio, fish custard and Rory's death (at least one of them).
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Old 03-04-2013, 20:33
Lowri
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Vincent is certainly an episode that grew on me. I wouldn't refer to it as a memorable scene as such but the Doctor's description of life as a pile of good things and a pile of bad things is something I brushed off at the time but various events have made me believe it completely. It gives me hope when I'm buried under the "bad things" because I know that whether it's in a day, a week, a month, the "good things" will come.
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Old 03-04-2013, 20:44
SuperDude95
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Rose and The Doctor saying goodbye in Doomsday, I was trying not to cry in front of my family
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Old 03-04-2013, 20:46
Lowri
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Rose and The Doctor saying goodbye in Doomsday, I was trying not to cry in front of my family
Oh yes, another vote for this from me. Also, the shot of them with the wall between them and the way they put their hands out is so simple yet speaks volumes
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Old 03-04-2013, 21:18
king yrcanos
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The one most notable one was at the end of School Reunion, I was crying at the end for Sarah Jane, maybe they were tears of happiness or joy, but that's the one of two occasions in Doctor Who when I've cried.
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Old 03-04-2013, 21:24
soulou
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The one most notable one was at the end of School Reunion, I was crying at the end for Sarah Jane, maybe they were tears of happiness or joy, but that's the one of two occasions in Doctor Who when I've cried.
This has reminded me. Seeing K9 again. I was about 10 years old when he was around originally and adored him.
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Old 03-04-2013, 21:31
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What strange music. Can you imagine music as weird as that being used on Doctor Who today?
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Old 03-04-2013, 21:39
johnnymc
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The snake in Kinda still makes me feel a bit sick. The malus projection in the tardis also disturbs me!

I thought celia imrie was really shocking at the end of the bells of st john. It was quite heartbreaking when the great intelligence just abandoned her to unit soldiers.
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