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Music released on vinyl in the 80s-90s (anyone else surprised by this?)


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Old 18-05-2013, 22:56
IzzyS
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I was quite surprised when I read recently that music (ie chart music, singles and albums) was still released on vinyl LPs into the early 90s. I was born in 83 and I cant remember ever seeing vinyl for sale in the shops, although I suppose I was too young to remember much of the 80s apart from cartoons and the like

I do, however, clearly remember getting a Walkman in the late 80s and getting a few casette tapes. I presumed cassette tapes were widely available and the main format for listening to music in the 80s and if I think of vinyls, I'd tend to think of music dating back from the turn of the century or beforehand up until the 1970s. Maybe thats mainly because most of my parents vinyl collection dates from the 50s-70s I'd have thought, so I presumed vinyl was out dated by the 80s.

I was originally curious about this having seen a clip from an old 1980s TOTP episode with the opening titles containing vinyls and I thought that seemed quite outdated - I presumed it was a retro thing until I saw someone post in this forum about buying singles on vinyl.

Anyone else surprised by this? maybe its just me. The only vinyl I knew as a kid were those small colourful plastic 'vinyls' you put into a childs mock record player which played nursery rhymes I find it fascinating for some reason though - when did cassette tapes become the main format, the late 80s onwards maybe? I clearly remember singles being widely available on cassette tape certainly by the early 90s. There were also those kids storybooks that came with a cassette tape which read out the stories and had the wand sound effect telling you when it was time to turn the tape over (aw, happy memories there ). I'm thinking they date from the 1980s, so I guess I took it for granted that cassette tapes were pretty much in the mainstream then but maybe I'm thinking late 80s. I guess it was the tail end of a generation I'm not quite old enough to remember...

Also (totally random, I know) - whatever happened to Minidiscs? they never really took off, did they? if availabe on the high street, there would only be a small selection and they cost quite alot I seem to remember.
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Old 18-05-2013, 23:09
mr_wonderful
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I doubt many other people will be surprised vinyl records were released in the 1980s.
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Old 18-05-2013, 23:12
IzzyS
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I doubt many other people will be surprised vinyl records were released in the 1980s.
Really? I guess its just me then. I'll get me coat
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Old 18-05-2013, 23:27
jargon
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I remember Woolworths having shelves for 7" singles up until about 1994.
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Old 19-05-2013, 00:29
tortfeasor
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I was quite surprised when I read recently that music (ie chart music, singles and albums) was still released on vinyl LPs into the early 90s...

Anyone else surprised by this? maybe its just me.
I'm not surprised that you don't remember seeing vinyl singles and LPs in shops. People remember various things from their early years, and some will be commonly recalled by their peers whilst others won't be. For instance, I know plenty of people our age (I'm in the same age bracket as you), who have memories of Edd the Duck, watching programmes like 'Dungeons & Dragons' and Sarah Greene and Philip Schofield presenting 'Going Live,' whilst others don't.

I dinstinctly remember going to record shops, looking at vinyl singles and LPs and buying them with my pocket money in the early 1990s. Mind you I used to spend a large part of my time in record shops as a child, in part because my father was a mobile DJ. He was still getting 12" vinyl in the late 1990s.

My first LP purchase was Kylie Minogue's 'Rhythm of Love' and I definitely bought my share of 7" singles including some of Kylie's. Other 7" purchases included 'Do the Bartman,'by The Simpsons (), Shakespears Sister's 'Stay,' Michael Jackson's 'Black or White' (and I purchased the 12" single because it also had 'Bad' on the A-side and 'Thriller' on the b-side) and KLF's 'Justified & Ancient.' I also remember having a bit of a row with my father because I'd bought the 'Remember the Time' single specifically because it had MJ's version of 'Come Together' as the b-side. You see I'd had the 'Dangerous' CD for Christmas and Dad told me I was wasting my money.

Also (totally random, I know) - whatever happened to Minidiscs? they never really took off, did they? if availabe on the high street, there would only be a small selection and they cost quite alot I seem to remember.
The MiniDisc was finally killed by the rise of MP3 players. However, it was impeded by so many things along the way. I think too many 'new' formats in a short period of time didn't help.

The players were very expensive at the time. CD players were still considerably expensive as I remember too. My father had to have a MiniDisc player of course! It didn't matter that our washing machine was constantly on the blink and the cooker was ancient or that money could have been better spent elsewhere!

In the 2000s the availability of cheaper blank CD-Rs and walkman CD players that would play data discs was a factor for people like me, who love listening to music and having lots of it for 'on the go.' I used to make loads of data CDs in the early 2000s. When mp3 players that could hold more than 1gb worth of files became cheaper, I switched.

I remember one friend in college having a MD walkman player and it was a surprise. To date he's the only person I knew who had a MD walkman. However, thinking back that friend used to spend his summers with his family in Japan and MiniDiscs were infinitely more popular in Japan.

The format definitely had a niche market here. I suspect the fact that there were only ever a small selection of albums on rather expensive MDs compared to CDs in the high street shops impacted on its lack of mass popularity, certainly to begin with. It's worth noting that it tended to be albums released on Sony owned record labels that were available to buy on MD.

I own a MiniDisc player/recorder but haven't used it for over 5 years - poor thing! There were some irritating aspects about the digital rights management Sony put on as I recall.
However, it was better technology than CDs and it is a pity that it didn't take off.

The MiniDisc was still quite popular with DJs and musicians along with people in 'the industry' a few years ago. Whenever I saw a singer in a pub or club, they nearly always used MiniDiscs for their backing tracks.

As of this year I believe Sony won't be shipping any new MiniDisc players.
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Old 19-05-2013, 11:08
IzzyS
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I'm not surprised that you don't remember seeing vinyl singles and LPs in shops. People remember various things from their early years, and some will be commonly recalled by their peers whilst others won't be. For instance, I know plenty of people our age (I'm in the same age bracket as you), who have memories of Edd the Duck, watching programmes like 'Dungeons & Dragons' and Sarah Greene and Philip Schofield presenting 'Going Live,' whilst others don't.

I dinstinctly remember going to record shops, looking at vinyl singles and LPs and buying them with my pocket money in the early 1990s. Mind you I used to spend a large part of my time in record shops as a child, in part because my father was a mobile DJ. He was still getting 12" vinyl in the late 1990s.

My first LP purchase was Kylie Minogue's 'Rhythm of Love' and I definitely bought my share of 7" singles including some of Kylie's. Other 7" purchases included 'Do the Bartman,'by The Simpsons (), Shakespears Sister's 'Stay,' Michael Jackson's 'Black or White' (and I purchased the 12" single because it also had 'Bad' on the A-side and 'Thriller' on the b-side) and KLF's 'Justified & Ancient.' I also remember having a bit of a row with my father because I'd bought the 'Remember the Time' single specifically because it had MJ's version of 'Come Together' as the b-side. You see I'd had the 'Dangerous' CD for Christmas and Dad told me I was wasting my money.



The MiniDisc was finally killed by the rise of MP3 players. However, it was impeded by so many things along the way. I think too many 'new' formats in a short period of time didn't help.

The players were very expensive at the time. CD players were still considerably expensive as I remember too. My father had to have a MiniDisc player of course! It didn't matter that our washing machine was constantly on the blink and the cooker was ancient or that money could have been better spent elsewhere!

In the 2000s the availability of cheaper blank CD-Rs and walkman CD players that would play data discs was a factor for people like me, who love listening to music and having lots of it for 'on the go.' I used to make loads of data CDs in the early 2000s. When mp3 players that could hold more than 1gb worth of files became cheaper, I switched.

I remember one friend in college having a MD walkman player and it was a surprise. To date he's the only person I knew who had a MD walkman. However, thinking back that friend used to spend his summers with his family in Japan and MiniDiscs were infinitely more popular in Japan.

The format definitely had a niche market here. I suspect the fact that there were only ever a small selection of albums on rather expensive MDs compared to CDs in the high street shops impacted on its lack of mass popularity, certainly to begin with. It's worth noting that it tended to be albums released on Sony owned record labels that were available to buy on MD.

I own a MiniDisc player/recorder but haven't used it for over 5 years - poor thing! There were some irritating aspects about the digital rights management Sony put on as I recall.
However, it was better technology than CDs and it is a pity that it didn't take off.

The MiniDisc was still quite popular with DJs and musicians along with people in 'the industry' a few years ago. Whenever I saw a singer in a pub or club, they nearly always used MiniDiscs for their backing tracks.

As of this year I believe Sony won't be shipping any new MiniDisc players.
Interesting, thanks for sharing I certainly remember Edd The Duck - and Gordon the Gopher I thought Dungeons and Dragons was boring and I dont really remember Going Live - I think I saw it but I dont remember it fully, only that they had phone ins and things that Live & Kicking also did.

I remember CD Walkmans (Discmans?) were very expensive in the early 90s - they were often given away as prizes on TV game shows etc. I got my Walkman from my late grandparents when I was about 5 or 6 I think and it came with a Michael Jackson compilation cassette tape - that must have been around about 1988 or 1989. I guess I was lucky then - cassettes (being newer?) must have more expensive than LPs - LPs/vinyl would never have been half as portable as cassettes though, obviously lol.

I remember those songs, I remember watching the video premiere of Black and White was it during or just after TOTP? around about 1992, I think? that takes me back a bit! I also remember Shakespear Sister.

I only managed to get a CD player in 1995, when I was 12 - I think it was also a present, either that or I'd saved up my pocket money but you could get them for close to the 50 mark I think by then, so they were more affordable. My family didn't have much money in the 80s and early 90s until my dad got a job promotion, so some things I didn't get. I used to have a radio/cassette player and lots of blank cassette tapes and I'd tape songs off the radio but I did buy a couple of official singles when I had the money, the two I remember being Crazy For You by Let Loose (cringe) and a dance song by Capella (followed by me asking my mum what capella meant lol). Oh and possibly another by Sean Maguire the rest were on CD closer to the late 90s when I was older and had more money.

I remember thinking CDs were amazing because you didnt have to sit and wait for certain songs to come on, you could tell it to play from the very start of a specific song, that seemed amazing lol.

Did you have one of those Sony CD Players that had something I think was called Atrac? that was like a data disk format, so you could play 100s of songs - it was a Sony specific feature I'm pretty sure. My car can play MP3 CDs, I love it. I've heard they might stop making CD players for cars and just include a USB or aux input instead as iPods are becoming the 'norm' but I wouldnt want to bring my iPod with me everytime I drive (what if you forget to take it out and it (and/or the car) gets stolen?), I'd much rather have a CD player that can play MP3 disks. My previous car only played 'regular CDs'.

I used to know someone who'd bang on about the compression rate of MP3s being much inferior to CDs, claiming if you really want to hear the closest to the original, full quality recording of any recorded music then your best bet is to get the vinyl version (if available, of course). MP3s or digital downloads can be bought in pretty high bit rates now and I don't have any real complaints about the sound quality but she was adamant about it and said digital downloads shouldn't be touched(!) she even claimed if you rip music from a CD to your computer, even at the highest possible bit rate, you'd lose quality compared to how it sounds on the original CD, if I remember right.

I think my first MP3 player only held 128mb or so but I thought it was great. How things change - I have a 32gb iPod now (and I used to refuse to buy anything Apple as it seemed such a rip off and all about design *sigh* im a hypcrit, had to swallow my words there).

I'm sorry you sometimes didn't get the things you needed, some people can be selfish that way.

ETA - I'd been browsing music job lots on Ebay recently and came across Now! compilations from the 1980s on vinyl which also surprised me. I somehow hadn't expected to see a brand like Now! on vinyl.

I also have a picture disk which is like a smaller sized vinyl made of a harder substance I think? I got that as I collect all the singles from the artist but I presume you need a record player to play it. They had one or two singles released on vinyl around 1996 but I thought that was more of a specialist thing for DJs since they have dance remixes - I guess I presumed DJs used vinyl for mixing etc. in the 90s but I presumed most people at home listened to music mainly on cassettes and CDs.
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Old 19-05-2013, 18:40
Billy Hicks
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I was born in 1988, and even in the mid-1990s I marvelled at my Grandma's record player and the records she had - I remember being told that this is what music "used" to be on, before tapes replaced them. Note not CDs! It wasn't really until the second half of the 90s that everyone had a CD player, I wouldn't be surprised if cassette singles were the dominant seller around 1992-3ish (correct me if I'm wrong).

The first number 1 not to be available on 7-inch in the UK was Culture Beat's 'Mr Vain' in September 1993. First number 1 not on vinyl at all was Celine Dion's 'Think Twice' in February 1995, and the most recent 7" I've seen in charity shops of that decade was Shaggy's 'In the Summertime' from later that year.

I remember being surprised to see a vinyl section in a HMV/Virgin Megastore in the late 90s, which was mostly filled with dance tracks. The 7-inch had a minor revival in the 2000s with some acts releasing singles on the format, but not enough to actually make an impact in the chart and probably only sold a few thousand.

EDIT: Now That's What I Call Music, amazingly, continued on vinyl until 1996 - Now 35 was the last one released on that format. Those last few vinyl releases have been known to go for quite a bit of money on eBay! They were also released on minidisc from 1999 to 2001. Cassettes continued until 2006, since then it's been CD/download.
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Old 19-05-2013, 18:54
IzzyS
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I was born in 1988, and even in the mid-1990s I marvelled at my Grandma's record player and the records she had - I remember being told that this is what music "used" to be on, before tapes replaced them. Note not CDs! It wasn't really until the second half of the 90s that everyone had a CD player, I wouldn't be surprised if cassette singles were the dominant seller around 1992-3ish (correct me if I'm wrong).

The first number 1 not to be available on 7-inch in the UK was Culture Beat's 'Mr Vain' in September 1993. First number 1 not on vinyl at all was Celine Dion's 'Think Twice' in February 1995, and the most recent 7" I've seen in charity shops of that decade was Shaggy's 'In the Summertime' from later that year.

I remember being surprised to see a vinyl section in a HMV/Virgin Megastore in the late 90s, which was mostly filled with dance tracks. The 7-inch had a minor revival in the 2000s with some acts releasing singles on the format, but not enough to actually make an impact in the chart and probably only sold a few thousand.

EDIT: Now That's What I Call Music, amazingly, continued on vinyl until 1996 - Now 35 was the last one released on that format. Those last few vinyl releases have been known to go for quite a bit of money on eBay! They were also released on minidisc from 1999 to 2001. Cassettes continued until 2006, since then it's been CD/download.
Yeah cassettes were the main format used in the 90s, as far as I can remember anyway. Thats interesting what the last singles were - 1993 onwards I remember fairly well (my memory is a bit patchy at times though).

Wow, Now 35? I just bought that second hand on CD the other week lol ive been collecting compilations from each year of the 90s and 80s for my music collection I just need to get one from 1992 and ill have both decades covered. I thought I'd seen some older Now! albums going for a fair few bob on Ebay (close to 20 or so).
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Old 19-05-2013, 20:43
scrilla
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I started buying vinyl in the 70's and didn't get a CD player until 1992. By '92 I had a couple of hundred CDs needing played as I had been buying titles I was interested in when they were cheap. I continued buying singles on both CD and vinyl throughout the '90s and remember seeing cassette singles about but I'm not sure if they were more popular than CD. It's possible that they might have been for a while but I never bought them. I have some albums on cassette but only because they were things I picked up for say, a pound. Mostly I used cassettes in blank form to record radio shows or make compilations from vinyl for playing in the car.

Vinyl singles in 7", 10" and 12" formats as well as LPs are still being releases in 2013 and I'm still buying. Generally not mainstream or 'chart' music though.

I can't have bought a CD single in about a decade but I must have fifteen hundred of them. Generally I would buy albums on CD now rather than vinyl and moved in this direction during the 90s. The main reasons I started was that there was a tendency for the CD releases to have more tracks due to the longer playtime possible (c. 75 minutes versus about 50 across the two sides of a 33rpm vinyl disc and the companies using this factor to push the format) and that it could be hard to pick up vinyl releases with the sleeves in nice condition, as they are easily damaged. It got to the stage where vinyl was something many of us would have to get by mail-order and now this is true for most physical music. That, and the every inceasing prices of vinyl pressings made it impractical for me.

Although CD arrived her in early '83 I don't think it really took off for about half-a-dozen years. Vinyl sales were probably irreparably damaged when the chainstores (Virgin, HMV, Woolworths, Our Price, Boots) stopped selling it during the 90s. Ironically HMV and I think, Virgin bought back a limited selection of mostly 12" singles in the late 90s or early 00s for the DJ market after being complicit in trying to kill it. Now Virgin is dead and HMV on its last legs. Big up the local indedendent record stores. Hopefully they will soldier on on and be joined by some new ones.

PS: the plural of vinyl is vinyl.
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Old 19-05-2013, 20:53
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I used to know someone who'd bang on about the compression rate of MP3s being much inferior to CDs, claiming if you really want to hear the closest to the original, full quality recording of any recorded music then your best bet is to get the vinyl version (if available, of course). MP3s or digital downloads can be bought in pretty high bit rates now and I don't have any real complaints about the sound quality but she was adamant about it and said digital downloads shouldn't be touched(!)
From the way you are reporting what this person told you, it sounds like you took little heed of what they were saying, which is fine I'm sure if you're happy enough with your music as mp3's.

she even claimed if you rip music from a CD to your computer, even at the highest possible bit rate, you'd lose quality compared to how it sounds on the original CD, if I remember right.
Claimed? You really sound like you don't believe this. The irony is that it's not a claim, it's a fact. She's 100% correct.
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Old 19-05-2013, 21:29
IzzyS
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I started buying vinyl in the 70's and didn't get a CD player until 1992. By '92 I had a couple of hundred CDs needing played as I had been buying titles I was interested in when they were cheap. I continued buying singles on both CD and vinyl throughout the '90s and remember seeing cassette singles about but I'm not sure if they were more popular than CD. It's possible that they might have been for a while but I never bought them. I have some albums on cassette but only because they were things I picked up for say, a pound. Mostly I used cassettes in blank form to record radio shows or make compilations from vinyl for playing in the car.

Vinyl singles in 7", 10" and 12" formats as well as LPs are still being releases in 2013 and I'm still buying. Generally not mainstream or 'chart' music though.

I can't have bought a CD single in about a decade but I must have fifteen hundred of them. Generally I would buy albums on CD now rather than vinyl and moved in this direction during the 90s. The main reasons I started was that there was a tendency for the CD releases to have more tracks due to the longer playtime possible (c. 75 minutes versus about 50 across the two sides of a 33rpm vinyl disc and the companies using this factor to push the format) and that it could be hard to pick up vinyl releases with the sleeves in nice condition, as they are easily damaged. It got to the stage where vinyl was something many of us would have to get by mail-order and now this is true for most physical music. That, and the every inceasing prices of vinyl pressings made it impractical for me.

Although CD arrived her in early '83 I don't think it really took off for about half-a-dozen years. Vinyl sales were probably irreparably damaged when the chainstores (Virgin, HMV, Woolworths, Our Price, Boots) stopped selling it during the 90s. Ironically HMV and I think, Virgin bought back a limited selection of mostly 12" singles in the late 90s or early 00s for the DJ market after being complicit in trying to kill it. Now Virgin is dead and HMV on its last legs. Big up the local indedendent record stores. Hopefully they will soldier on on and be joined by some new ones.

PS: the plural of vinyl is vinyl.
You must have had alot of money to be able to buy CDs back in the early 90s - they were expensive enough by the late 90s. I remember when albums cost 12.99 each, or even 13.99 in WH Smith I think.

I remember cassettes being available alongside CDs. Cassette singles once cost 1.99, with CD singles being 3.99, like in Virgin Megastores. Later on, it went down to 99p for cassette singles and 1.99 for CD singles, if I remember right.

You could get some bargain cassette tapes at car boot sales and the like, when CDs were becoming really popular in the mid 90s. I got some bargains that way...I still have a cassette player for the few tapes I've kept.

I don't think there are many independent record stores. Perhaps in cities but I don't know of any particularly local to where I live.
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Old 19-05-2013, 21:40
IzzyS
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From the way you are reporting what this person told you, it sounds like you took little heed of what they were saying, which is fine I'm sure if you're happy enough with your music as mp3's.


Claimed? You really sound like you don't believe this. The irony is that it's not a claim, it's a fact. She's 100% correct.
I never said that, I just found it a bit hard to believe (though maybe im a sucker, I don't know) as I thought the point in changing formats is that their only changed when an improved way to deliver music is found, or however you word that - if the quality was much worse then people wouldn't want to move to the new format. I thought that if you encode or rip a track above 128kbps then its the full quality that the CD offers and encoding above that doesn't improve the audio quality of the actual file, it just makes the file size larger.

As for vinyl, new releases aren't automatically released on that format I think, so the best you can buy is a CD, so I presume. I only really listen to music through headphones and not on speakers (the only exception being in my car) and I'm presuming with vinyl you'd tend to play that through speakers, so I'm not really so keen on that. I suppose even if you have the best sound quality, if my earphones are rubbish then it wouldn't matter anyway though.
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Old 19-05-2013, 22:28
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Vinyl was still pretty much king in the 80's, but cassettes were popular too, especially to play in cars or on personal stereos. CD's didn't really start to become popular until the late 80's from what I remember. I got my first CD player in 1988 (first CD I got was Kylie's debut album) and throughout the 90's I bought CD albums/singles but also still bought a lot of vinyl. A lot of the Brit Pop/Indie bands of the mid to late 90's I still bought on vinyl but lots of CD's too. I rarely ever bought pre-recorded cassettes as I didn't like the sound quality of them, compared to CD's and vinyl. If I wanted to listen to music on my Walkman cassette player I'd record albums/songs onto blank cassettes from my CD's and vinyl records.
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Old 20-05-2013, 00:10
scrilla
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I never said that, I just found it a bit hard to believe (though maybe im a sucker, I don't know) as I thought the point in changing formats is that their only changed when an improved way to deliver music is found, or however you word that - if the quality was much worse then people wouldn't want to move to the new format. I thought that if you encode or rip a track above 128kbps then its the full quality that the CD offers and encoding above that doesn't improve the audio quality of the actual file, it just makes the file size larger.
Mp3s are about convenience more than sound quality, so the improvement is to do with portability and storage space.
128kbps is definitely NOT great quality. 320kpbs is far better but the .wav files on a CD are 1411kbps. Mp3 is a 'lossy' format and the lower the bitrate, the more of the signal that is removed. If you have music on vinyl or cassette or CD it would be better to archive it digitally in a lossless format such as FLAC (free lossless audio codec). Flac files encoded from audio CDs are typically just over half the size of the discs .wav files but are lossless. The reason they are smaller is because the date is stored differently. Flac files can be converted to .wav files as required or compressed as mp3s for use with mobile devices using free programs such as Audacity.

As for vinyl, new releases aren't automatically released on that format I think, so the best you can buy is a CD, so I presume. I only really listen to music through headphones and not on speakers (the only exception being in my car) and I'm presuming with vinyl you'd tend to play that through speakers, so I'm not really so keen on that. I suppose even if you have the best sound quality, if my earphones are rubbish then it wouldn't matter anyway though.
For most new music the default hard-copy format is CD. It the music has been recorded and mastered digitally there's no reason the vinyl release should be superior. Vinyl has some limitations of it's format. Plenty of people who would care about sound quality and own good hi-fi equipment use headphones to listen to music. If you don't live alone (or with people sympathetic to your music choices) or have neighbours in close proximity it can be a wise choice.

I read of someone who was converting their library of mp3s to 'lossless' wav files. No matter what bit rate they are this is not possible. A 320kbps mp3 track converted to 1411kbps wav file will have the same audio quality as the mp3 but take up far more space. Of course, if you have lossless music you can make it smaller for convenience and reduce the quality as a result. Whether the reduction in quality would be noticeable to the person when playing it through whatever system/s they use is another matter.
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Old 20-05-2013, 00:22
scrilla
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You must have had alot of money to be able to buy CDs back in the early 90s - they were expensive enough by the late 90s. I remember when albums cost 12.99 each, or even 13.99 in WH Smith I think.

I remember cassettes being available alongside CDs. Cassette singles once cost 1.99, with CD singles being 3.99, like in Virgin Megastores. Later on, it went down to 99p for cassette singles and 1.99 for CD singles, if I remember right.

You could get some bargain cassette tapes at car boot sales and the like, when CDs were becoming really popular in the mid 90s. I got some bargains that way...I still have a cassette player for the few tapes I've kept.

I don't think there are many independent record stores. Perhaps in cities but I don't know of any particularly local to where I live.
Well, to be fair, I do have what most people would consider a pretty large music collection but because I buy a lot, I'm also a bargain hunter and certainly any CDs I was buying before I actually bought a CD player in 1992 were very cheap and I always try to buy as cheaply as I can, to this day. Pay less for each item: buy more items, I guess is my philosophy. A lot of the CD sigles I was buying in the 90s were in the 50p / 99p price range with some at 25p and some at 1.99 and I'd always raid the sales after Christmas for albums that were getting cleared.

Yes, the independent record store thing is a problem now, with not so many even existing: what with legal downloads, illegal downloads and the likes of Amazon. My nearest is in a city fifteen miles away so I'm not in browsing every week but it's nice to have the option. Several of the others I used in towns I commute to closed around eight years ago.
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Old 20-05-2013, 00:36
iseloid
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Not at all. Mum had Bad on vinyl, and adores it haha
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Old 20-05-2013, 02:00
ShaunIOW
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I was buying vinyl until 1991 (mainly albums not available on cassette or CD or picture discs).
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Old 20-05-2013, 02:01
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There's a vinyl shop near my uni. To be fair, it looks really good in there and kind of wish I could buy a vinyl CD to play. I think at home, my parents have the vinyl player somewhere hidden. But we still had it in our house at the start of 00s (even though we had a CD player too by then).
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Old 20-05-2013, 06:28
homer2012
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Was buying my dance music on vinyl in 1998/1999
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Old 20-05-2013, 10:48
IzzyS
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Mp3s are about convenience more than sound quality, so the improvement is to do with portability and storage space.
128kbps is definitely NOT great quality. 320kpbs is far better but the .wav files on a CD are 1411kbps. Mp3 is a 'lossy' format and the lower the bitrate, the more of the signal that is removed. If you have music on vinyl or cassette or CD it would be better to archive it digitally in a lossless format such as FLAC (free lossless audio codec). Flac files encoded from audio CDs are typically just over half the size of the discs .wav files but are lossless. The reason they are smaller is because the date is stored differently. Flac files can be converted to .wav files as required or compressed as mp3s for use with mobile devices using free programs such as Audacity.


For most new music the default hard-copy format is CD. It the music has been recorded and mastered digitally there's no reason the vinyl release should be superior. Vinyl has some limitations of it's format. Plenty of people who would care about sound quality and own good hi-fi equipment use headphones to listen to music. If you don't live alone (or with people sympathetic to your music choices) or have neighbours in close proximity it can be a wise choice.

I read of someone who was converting their library of mp3s to 'lossless' wav files. No matter what bit rate they are this is not possible. A 320kbps mp3 track converted to 1411kbps wav file will have the same audio quality as the mp3 but take up far more space. Of course, if you have lossless music you can make it smaller for convenience and reduce the quality as a result. Whether the reduction in quality would be noticeable to the person when playing it through whatever system/s they use is another matter.
Ok, thanks for the information.

Well, to be fair, I do have what most people would consider a pretty large music collection but because I buy a lot, I'm also a bargain hunter and certainly any CDs I was buying before I actually bought a CD player in 1992 were very cheap and I always try to buy as cheaply as I can, to this day. Pay less for each item: buy more items, I guess is my philosophy. A lot of the CD sigles I was buying in the 90s were in the 50p / 99p price range with some at 25p and some at 1.99 and I'd always raid the sales after Christmas for albums that were getting cleared.

Yes, the independent record store thing is a problem now, with not so many even existing: what with legal downloads, illegal downloads and the likes of Amazon. My nearest is in a city fifteen miles away so I'm not in browsing every week but it's nice to have the option. Several of the others I used in towns I commute to closed around eight years ago.
Wow, that is cheap! I'm surprised you could find any at that price range - were they perhaps re-releases of old music? (or did they tend to be?).
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Old 20-05-2013, 11:00
IzzyS
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There's a vinyl shop near my uni. To be fair, it looks really good in there and kind of wish I could buy a vinyl CD to play. I think at home, my parents have the vinyl player somewhere hidden. But we still had it in our house at the start of 00s (even though we had a CD player too by then).
There was an independent record store on sale on Ebay a couple of months or so ago, I spotted the listing when searching for something else. It was in London, called (I think) Retro Man or Retro Bloke or something. The listing had loads of photos of their stock, they had absolutely tons of vinyl and CDs as well as DVDs etc. it made me daydream about running such a store - I thought that was a cool thought (though if I did then maybe I'd rename it to Retro Lady or something lol ).

They were looking for roughly half a million - I wonder if it sold?.
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Old 20-05-2013, 16:28
shackfan
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Originally Posted by Izzy[B
S;65971256]You must have had alot of money to be able to buy CDs back in the early 90s - they were expensive enough by the late 90s. I remember when albums cost 12.99 each, or even 13.99 in WH Smith I think.
[/b]
I remember cassettes being available alongside CDs. Cassette singles once cost 1.99, with CD singles being 3.99, like in Virgin Megastores. Later on, it went down to 99p for cassette singles and 1.99 for CD singles, if I remember right.

You could get some bargain cassette tapes at car boot sales and the like, when CDs were becoming really popular in the mid 90s. I got some bargains that way...I still have a cassette player for the few tapes I've kept.

I don't think there are many independent record stores. Perhaps in cities but I don't know of any particularly local to where I live.
What a bizarre thing to say. I was buying cds for around 15 in the mid 80s. That was the price so you paid it. Remember when dvds first came out and were well over 10. New technology is always a few quid more at the start.
In fact considering new technology often takes a good 10 years to become well and truly the only format people buy, it should not be a shock to anyone that vinyl was still readily available during the 80s and 90s.
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Old 20-05-2013, 19:20
IzzyS
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What a bizarre thing to say. I was buying cds for around 15 in the mid 80s. That was the price so you paid it. Remember when dvds first came out and were well over 10. New technology is always a few quid more at the start.
In fact considering new technology often takes a good 10 years to become well and truly the only format people buy, it should not be a shock to anyone that vinyl was still readily available during the 80s and 90s.
What was bizarre, sorry? yes I remember when DVDs cost close to 20 - the first one I got was You've Got Mail which was something like 18.99 around 2001 and we could only play DVDs through a DVD drive on our home computer then.

Like you say, most new technologies or formats cost more until most people own the devices to play them, so they'll then be able to sell more and can bring down the price per unit.
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Old 20-05-2013, 19:54
CLL Dodge
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I switched to CD in 1991. Vinyl all the way before then.
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Old 20-05-2013, 21:08
scrilla
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Ok, thanks for the information.
No problem.

Wow, that is cheap! I'm surprised you could find any at that price range - were they perhaps re-releases of old music? (or did they tend to be?).
Actually it would mostly have been new releases. The shops would get them free from record company reps who wer trying to push certain new release into the chart and sometimes they'd fire them out very cheaply to attract sales, or reduce them in a few weeks if they hadn't gone. Times have changed.

Coming back to records, there are some 12" and 7" singles I have several copies of because they were so cheap I couldn't leave them.
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