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Old 25-05-2013, 12:00
Michael_Eve
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Sure I'm not being v original here, but was wondering; which stories not highly regarded (in general) by fandom really float your boat? Be out and proud; spread the love.

My 20th Century Who choices;

1. The Gunfighters: Pre-Video and DVD (aka The Dark Times) there was a lot of "received wisdom" in fandom. Eg this story was flamin' awful! Saw it in the Mid 80's (somehow ) and thought it was terrific. Brilliant Bill in top form, Peter Purves excellent...very good fun.

2. The Power of Kroll: First complete Graham Williams story I saw after becoming a fan in '82. (Again, oldies like me know how) . Aforementioned "received wisdom" seemed to be that this era was pretty silly, cheap and shoddy. Again...thoroughly enjoyed the story. Lovely location work, Tom on charisma overload, the original and IMO best Romana, Green High Priests praying to flaccid rubber tentacles..What's not to like?

3. Greatest Show in the Galaxy: My favourite McCoy story/performance. Surreal, thoughtful, lots of subtext (the show itself; 60's idealism lost to 80's materialism) colourful, chilling (Ian Reddinton is superb as the Chief Clown and Bellboy's suicide still makes me shiver) The direction is absolutely superb too.

Any more for anymore? NB Mocking of choices will lead to serious tutting.
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:08
ShootyDogThing
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I think '42' is a really great episode
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:09
tomwozhere
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I think '42' is a really great episode
I agree, I don't know why it's hated as much as it is.
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:12
Koquillion
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Death to the Daleks can get a bit of bad press, but I love it.

Timelash...Can't explain this one at all, just think it's really enjoyable nonesense!.
Anyway, I am off to wash my 'I heart Twin Dilemma' t-shirt...
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:15
CoalHillJanitor
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Agree with Death to the Daleks and Timelash. I also don't think Underworld is as bad as its reputation, and I am a fan of The Beast Below.
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:27
Tom Tit
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Delta and the Bannermen.

I understand why it offends the sensibilities of some viewers and even have a little sympathy. Maybe it was an ill-advised serial for Doctor Who, but if we put aside the issue of whether it was tonally suitable and just judge it for what it is it's actually quite good.

The scripts are clever and witty and there is a lot of story packed into three episodes, all of it cohesive. The whole thing feels somewhat like a cartoon and that was deliberate. It's like a live action Doctor Who cartoon. Not to a lot of people's taste maybe, but well realized. I also love the visual design of the Bannermen. The storyline with the Princess and her offspring is pretty outrageous and the scene with Mel walking in on her with the baby is surely going too far into absurdity for anyone but damn it, I like it. That was a knowing script, not a ham-fisted one, like a lot of 80s stories unfortunately were. They knew it was out there but wanted to push the envelope a bit. I admire that, even whilst being able to say it was probably the wrong direction. But after the mediocrity of the Eric Saward years the show needed to do something different and they were trying. At least Cartmel was giving it his all, unlike his former encumbent.


I also like Love & Monsters for similar reasons. And because I just find Peter Kay hilarious in it. I think one of the great things about Doctor Who is its versatility; you can do so much with it, so I think it's kind of a waste that some people think it should be the 'base under siege' formula every single week.


OP: I love your choices. Three very enjoyable stories. I've praised the Gunfighters a lot on this forum, The Greatest Show in the Galaxy is probably my second favourite McCoy after Ghost Light and I personally love the whole Key to Time season. I don't consider there to be any weak stories in it. Although it did unfortunately finish with maybe the weakest (the Armageddon Factor) that's only relative to the previous ones. It was still very decent Doctor Who.


I agree, I don't know why it's hated as much as it is.
Well, I can't speak for anyone else but I can tell you why I don't like it - because it is 45 minutes of running around and shouting, with little actual story.
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:32
Antimon_Bush
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THE RINGS OF AKHATEN - one of the best episodes ever. It's so imaginative, emotional, escapist and magical . I can't understand why people dislike this episode so much. Definitely the most underrated episode.

Other great and underrated episodes are:
- Shakespeare Code
- Gridlock
- Partners in Crime
- Midnight
- Planet of the Dead
- Night Terrors

Not great but still underrated:
- Fear Her (average IMO)
- Smith and Jones (good introduction to Martha Jones)
- The Beast Below (I like whole series 5, including this episode)
- The Curse of the Black Spot
- The Doctor, the Window and the Wardrobe
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:40
Tom Tit
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THE RINGS OF AKHATEN - one of the best episodes ever. I can't understand why people dislike this episode so much.
There was a bandwagon in town. A 6 out of 10 story can become a crisis when fandom watches it in a bad mood
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:42
allen_who
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THE RINGS OF AKHATEN - one of the best episodes ever. I can't understand why people dislike this episode so much. Definitely the most underrated episode.

Other great and underrated episodes are:
- Shakespeare Code
- Gridlock
- Partners in Crime
- Midnight
- Planet of the Dead
- Night Terrors

Not great but still underrated:
- Fear Her (average IMO)
- Smith and Jones (good introduction to Martha Jones)
- The Beast Below
- The Curse of the Black Spot
- The Doctor, the Window and the Wardrobe
The Beast Below

Even Moffat himself says that was a bit of a mess and he wrote it
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:46
Antimon_Bush
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The Beast Below

Even Moffat himself says that was a bit of a mess and he wrote it
I like whole series 5, including this episode.
Smilers and pre-title sequence were great. Also, Amy was fantastic in this episode (much better then in the series 6).
But I admit that the plot wasn't one of the best. It is average.
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:48
AdelaideGirl
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What was messy about The Beast Below? I was re watching it two hours ago - fantastic story about ethics and the treatment of animals.
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:56
allen_who
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What was messy about The Beast Below? I was re watching it two hours ago - fantastic story about ethics and the treatment of animals.
Well my lovely Anzac Highway friend I actually agree with you really.. I thought it was quite entertaining. But when I saw a moffat interview where he ranked his best and worst stories he put this at the bottom and said it was a mess. So at that point I allowed myself to agree with him but in reality it was far from a mess and Amy saving the day was great...

Peace and goodwill and a trip to the Marion shopping centre
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Old 25-05-2013, 12:58
Tom Tit
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What was messy about The Beast Below? I was re watching it two hours ago - fantastic story about ethics and the treatment of animals.

A little bit obvious and manipulative maybe? I'm guessing from your post that it was preaching to the converted with the theme so I guess you would find it more palatable than some but for me, the payoff just wasn't convincing. I do not believe that the revelation of the 'space whale' would get the reaction it did. The human race is pretty savage and given it's history with every other species on planet Earth I really don't think it's use of the creature was anything more than business as usual. Everyone's sudden remorse and disgust just didn't ring true. It was forced. As was the quite cynical tug on the heartstrings when it is revealed that the lovely, grudgeless creature just wanted to help children and was still quite happy to do so after its treatment. You can pile it on a little too thick and this story does so.

As someone else has pointed out, this story is regularly singled out by Steven Moffat as his weakest and I would back the writer's instincts on this one. That said... it's still not awful.
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Old 25-05-2013, 13:00
Dalek101
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I love the Death to the Daleks! It just gets a bit of bad press because of the Dalek music
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Old 25-05-2013, 13:13
AdelaideGirl
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A little bit obvious and manipulative maybe? I'm guessing from your post that it was preaching to the converted with the theme so I guess you would find it more palatable than some but for me, the payoff just wasn't convincing. I do not believe that the revelation of the 'space whale' would get the reaction it did. The human race is pretty savage and given it's history with every other species on planet Earth I really don't think it's use of the creature was anything more than business as usual. Everyone's sudden remorse and disgust just didn't ring true. It was forced. As was the quite cynical tug on the heartstrings when it is revealed that the lovely, grudgeless creature just wanted to help children and was still quite happy to do so after its treatment. You can pile it on a little too thick and this story does so.

As someone else has pointed out, this story is regularly singled out by Steven Moffat as his weakest and I would back the writer's instincts on this one. That said... it's still not awful.
Ok I'll certainly acknowledge that I'm left wingish and vegetarian so it was always going to appeal. But given recent reactions to scandals around live exports and any cruelty to cats or dogs and that whales tend to be given special respect it's not that far fetched.
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Old 25-05-2013, 13:29
bennythedip
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I can't stand 42 just can't watch it.reminds me too much of Stella and Carl in corrie. A daft one I always enjoy is keys of marinus.I guess I've fallen for that one because it was the 1st properly restored black and white vhs.
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Old 25-05-2013, 13:32
Michael_Eve
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Enjoying the replies...ta.

I agree about 'Death to the Daleks'...probably only second to The Time Warrior for me re: Season 11. Also fond of 'Delta...'; easily my favourite of Season 24. (That sounds a bit 'damning with faint praise' but no, I think it's a lot of fun and really sees McCoy coming into his own) '...Marinus' is v enjoyable too.

Still pondering 21st Century choices...but count me in as a 'Beast Below' admirer.
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Old 25-05-2013, 13:59
kyllerbuzcut
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The Gangers 2 parter gets a lot of stick but I love it. Rings was great this season I thought too. I also liked Dinosaurs, which got a lot of stick.
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Old 25-05-2013, 14:05
Shawn_Lunn
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What was messy about The Beast Below? I was re watching it two hours ago - fantastic story about ethics and the treatment of animals.
Nothing. I think it's an interesting episode.
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Old 25-05-2013, 14:07
SilenceWillFall
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The Beast Below and A Town Called Mercy are two episodes that are on my all time favrite list, but don't seem to be generally that popular or are considered bad. Also, while Rings of Akhaten is not my favorite episode ever, the kind of criticism it got puzzles me, because IMO it wasn't any better or worse than most others average NuWho episodes.
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Old 25-05-2013, 14:23
Abomination
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Aliens of London / World War Three (Series 1)
This two-part story wasn't brilliant, and it could have done without the fart gags (but then I suppose we would have never got that whole "When they fart, if you'll pardon the word..." bit from Harriet Jones, which was just priceless) but it still had plenty going for it. The focus on London was a new thing for the show, and was still quite refreshing here (try saying the same come The End of Time ), we were introduced to the likes of Harriet Jones and Toshiko Sato - two of my favourite but most mistreated women of RTD's era. The story was large-scale and the scene of Big Ben getting destroyed was iconic. And there's just so much more to this two-parter that makes it a worthy re-watch. No episode is perfect, and this story certainly isn't by any stretch of the word, but it was a fun adventure showing off Eccleston's acting talents on all sides.

Tooth and Claw (Series 2)
I often criticise the Moffat-era episodes of being too fast paced, and that some stories rush around too much trying to look cool that they struggle to find room for any substance. Tooth and Claw is an episode that often doesn't get mentioned in either good lists or bad lists of episodes, but I feel that it definitely warrants a mention. If you can cast aside the red-dressed monks at the start that look like part of a BBC pre-show ident, there's a lot going for this episode. The characters are well written, there's a dark and gothic undertone to the plot, the time period is very well realised (with the deliberate exception of Rose's 'naked' attire), and there are clever plot points set up for the series story arc and spin-off. But better than all of that was the fast pacing and high-octane action I'd usually expect in a Moffat episode - it's admittedly quite primitive in that it involves a lot of running down corridors, but then Doctor Who is partly famous for that. I also think it's the only episode from the early second series that seemed to suit David Tennant better than it would have suited Christopher Eccleston.

The Runaway Bride (Series 3)
Many people either don't like this episode, or consider it too much of a repeat of what The Christmas Invasion had to offer. As stories on their own though, I would choose The Runaway Bride every time. Donna was admittedly very over the top in her introduction, but it's the sort of zest-injection the show needed fr Christmas given the absence of Rose for the very first time. The story actually features a lot more of The Doctor as well, which pans out better in terms of delivering a Doctor Who Special. The Racnoss was a brilliant design, the scene on what I gathered was supposed to be the Hammersmith flyover was similarly impressive, and the death of the Racnoss children was one of the darkest but best scenes from the whole of the RTD-era. The episode wouldn't win any awards for 'best episode', but I think it's far superior in almost every respect to the Christmas episode before it - unfortunately, this will always be 'the one that came after', 'the tired retread'.

Gridlock (Series 3)
This episode comes with one of those easy-to-sum-up concepts. It's "the one with the motorway". It's hard to pin-point what exactly, but Gridlock offers us something fresh and new we haven't seen before, whilst also bringing us back to a Nu-Who familiar world and a Classic-Who familiar foe. The whole thing looks impressive, when you can look past some of the slightly cartoon-esque visuals, and the religious undertones give the story gravitas and resonance... adding some well needed depth to the New Earth trilogy and rounding it off nicely. With the reveal of the Face of Boe's secret, and The Doctor's emotional talk to Martha at the end about fighting the Daleks, there was some strong continuity in here as well. And that final shot of the New New York skyline is still amazing to this day...one of the best single CGI shots that Nu-Who has presented in its eight years so far.

42 (Series 3)
The first contribution from Chris Chibnall, who later returned for the Silurian two-parter in Series 5, and the dinosaur and cube episodes of Series 7. As it happens, 42 is the only episode of Chibnall's I have actually liked. And yet it's probably the only one of his episodes I went in expecting not to like (it looked like a smaller scale retread of Series 2's The Impossible Planet at the time). The threat in this episode is an interesting one, whilst again the visuals stay very impressive, and the acting very strong. Martha, or I should say Freema, is on top form here in one of her best episodes. It was good to actually show the Doctor so powerless and in pain, as we usually have to just believe he is from what we're told. I think if played in real-time this would have been even more impressive an episode, but even without it this is one of my favourites from the Nu-Who era.

Partners in Crime (Series 4)
This episode gets a lot of flack for the Adipose - the little blobs of fat that constitute the 'threat' of the story. Whilst I can definitely concur that they come across as the least bit threatening, I thought that was entirely part of their charm and that many people seemed to miss the point of them, and the episode as a whole. Many said the show had "lost it" at this point, or had become a joke you'd find on Cbeebies. I think this episode added nothing but variety. Not every alien in the universe is going to be a sharp-toothed monster or moustache-twirling villain with a cackling laugh. It was great to see that addressed, particularly after the likes of Max Capricorn in Voyage of the Damned. There were some strong emotional scenes between Wilf and Donna who were brilliantly reintroduced and placed together, the Adipose space ship was an inspired design that looked like something out of Close Encounters, the scene with the Doctor talking to himself in the TARDIS was very touching, and the reveal of Rose at the end was probably the biggest "WOAH" moment until Moffat pulled off the same stunt with Oswin but across the whole of the opening episode of Series 7. In terms of opening episodes, I feel this was probably my favourite of the whole of RTD's era.

The Sontaran Stratagem / The Poison Sky (Series 4)
Looking back at the first story from Helen Raynor (the Dalek two-parter from Series 3), you can see how much of a flawed story it is. The effects don't convincingly pull off the New York setting, the Daleks take control of another Earth skyscraper (yawn!) and the pig-slave element was just annoying. But for all it's flaws, I cannot deny that Raynor gave the story a brilliant script and a nice bit of direction here and there. I think this really emerges again in her second story, the Sontaran two-parter from Series 4. As someone who'd not seen a Sontaran story before, I was most impressed. UNIT were back again, as was Martha, and I was genuinely concerned for Wilf. Note that The Poison Sky is essentially the first time we got Donna, Martha and Rose all in one episode (sort of) and I feel that this is quite an underrated story that really refreshed the London-centric global invasion element of RTD's tenure.

The Unicorn and the Wasp (Series 4)
I feel that this is another episode that you'll either 'get' or you won't. It was the first time in an RTD episode that I'd felt that the whole world wasn't in jeopardy, that the story was a little more closely-knit and intimate. This is played up to brilliant effect as an Agatha Christie mystery, complete with moody sax music in the background. This is the sort of thing I imagined when we were told about the 'movie-poster' element of Series 7, as this really has a genre all of its own. The entire cast are on top form, and Gareth Roberts delivers a hilarious and fun script that really pays tribute to Agatha Christie as well.

The Beast Below (Series 5)
Between Series 4 and the end of Series 6, this was the only in-series episode of Doctor Who penned by Moffat that didn't feature River Song. Despite my liking that character, it is always interesting to see what else Moffat has to offer. On initial viewing, I considered The Beast Below to be one of my least favourite episodes of Doctor Who ever. I now happily take that back, and think it had a lot more to do with how I hadn't yet adjusted to Moffat's era. I don't care if the man himself has even commented on it being his poorest episode (I think most of his Series 6 episodes were weaker) I absolutely love this. Liz Ten is a brilliant gun-ho character whose given a lot of substance come the episodes conclusion, the concept itself is a brilliant one sat somewhere between sci-fi and fairytale and Amy Pond shows her worth here as well. I would love to see a further adventure of the Starship UK and explore some more of the ship The soundtrack for the episode is also very good, with some of it even going on to be used in the 'Afterword' segment of Amy's last episode.

The Vampires of Venice (Series 5)
Toby Whithouse gave us an adventurous episode with some spectacular acting power here. The vampires being revealed as fish people wasn't quite what I expected, but I enjoyed it all the same. Again the score was very impressive, the story is engaging enough, and there are encouraging hints of a promising story arc woven throughout. There's not some in-depth rational reasoning for why I think this episode is very good, it just comes across that way to me.

The Curse of the Black Spot (Series 6)
This poor episode found itself wedged between the massive astronaut two-parter, and the impressive Neil Gaiman episode that people had been waiting nearly two years to see. On that front it never stood a chance, and whilst it's not a perfect episode that has a fair few errors in it as well, it's a very decent one when you give credit where it's due. Stuck to the confines of a ship for most of the story, perhaps this is insight into what an episode would be like if it was set wholly in the TARDIS console room? But the Siren is a brilliantly designed and fantastically conceived threat, whilst the ship-on-a-ship element at the end was also nicely done.

A Town Called Mercy (Series 7)
I absolutely loved this story. Whilst it didn't have the lasting impact of, say, Asylum of the Daleks, it was probably one of only a couple of episodes of Series 7 I can say managed to cope with the 45 minute limit very nicely indeed. That's not because the story isn't all that, it's because the characters and the location are given room to breathe and are established convincingly. I didn't see the reveal at the end of the episode coming at all either, and think that plot-wise this episode had a pay off for me that the likes of The Power of Three never would.

The Rings of Akhaten (Series 7)
Rose got Platform One, Martha got The Globe Theatre, Donna got Pompeii, Amy got the Starship UK and Clara got Akhaten. All of these episodes have been subjected to a more-than-average amount of criticism in some way or another, with The Rings of Akhaten probably being the least liked of the bunch. I really don't understand why though, as it presents us with a rare example of a child actor that isn't annoying, and an enchanting story that is epic and beautiful. Doctor Who has never been very good with science, and Akhaten is just up front about it. Clara is given a lot of character development here, and Matt Smith's monologuing has improved so much since Series 5. The Vigil are an impressively designed threat I only wanted to see more of, the Mummy was deliberately underwhelming and the real threat was brilliantly realised. On top of that, the episode delivers a couple of good songs that advance the plot, and really don't get in the way as much as many people made out at the time (they total less than 5 minutes between them both!). It's fun, it's eerie, it's sentimental, but it's brand new too... I loved this episode and consider it second only to The Crimson Horror in the second half of Series 7.
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Old 25-05-2013, 14:35
brouhaha
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Iím not sure if itís considered awful but The Web Planet is often held up as an example of a sixties Doctor Who that just didnít work. It works fine for me, however. I think itís tremendously atmospheric, helped enormously by the filters used on the camera lenses, which give Vortis an eerie quality. OK, none of the alien life forms are completely successful but the fact that the only characters who are human in appearance are the TARDIS crew is another aspect that was rare for Doctor Who at the time (in fact not just at the time, thinking about it). It seems to have been a genuine attempt to create an alien environment and Iíve always thought that should be applauded at least.

Iíve never understood the kickings that Revenge of the Cybermen has got over the years either. I have to admit I have particularly fond memories of watching it as a child so I suppose thatís one of the reasons I love it still but, even watching it today, I donít think itís as bad as people make out. Maybe itís because it came slap bang in the middle of what many consider to be Doctor Whoís golden period, and anything that didnít quite come up to the extremely high standard that the programme had set itself is looked on more negatively than it perhaps deserves to be. OK, on the negative side, the Cybermen themselves arenít realised particularly well (e.g. the Cyberleader stutting around with hands on hips!) and are clearly, ahem, lacking in number but at least this latter point is actually addressed on screen with a great Tom Baker line. And they still had this six year old hiding behind the sofa! (Although I do admit that the Cybermat was a bit crap.) BUT!... On the plus side, Voga is extremely well done, both in the lovely studio sets and the great use of Wookey Hole as a location, most of the acting is excellent (particularly the three leading Vogans) and, really, how can any story be considered terrible with Tom Baker, Lis Sladen and Ian Marter in it? The interplay between the three leads is really lovely to watch.

Oh, and I really like 42 as well
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Old 25-05-2013, 14:41
Antimon_Bush
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Gridlock (Series 3)
This episode comes with one of those easy-to-sum-up concepts. It's "the one with the motorway". It's hard to pin-point what exactly, but Gridlock offers us something fresh and new we haven't seen before, whilst also bringing us back to a Nu-Who familiar world and a Classic-Who familiar foe. The whole thing looks impressive, when you can look past some of the slightly cartoon-esque visuals, and the religious undertones give the story gravitas and resonance... adding some well needed depth to the New Earth trilogy and rounding it off nicely. With the reveal of the Face of Boe's secret, and The Doctor's emotional talk to Martha at the end about fighting the Daleks, there was some strong continuity in here as well. And that final shot of the New New York skyline is still amazing to this day...one of the best single CGI shots that Nu-Who has presented in its eight years so far.

Partners in Crime (Series 4)
This episode gets a lot of flack for the Adipose - the little blobs of fat that constitute the 'threat' of the story. Whilst I can definitely concur that they come across as the least bit threatening, I thought that was entirely part of their charm and that many people seemed to miss the point of them, and the episode as a whole. Many said the show had "lost it" at this point, or had become a joke you'd find on Cbeebies. I think this episode added nothing but variety. Not every alien in the universe is going to be a sharp-toothed monster or moustache-twirling villain with a cackling laugh. It was great to see that addressed, particularly after the likes of Max Capricorn in Voyage of the Damned. There were some strong emotional scenes between Wilf and Donna who were brilliantly reintroduced and placed together, the Adipose space ship was an inspired design that looked like something out of Close Encounters, the scene with the Doctor talking to himself in the TARDIS was very touching, and the reveal of Rose at the end was probably the biggest "WOAH" moment until Moffat pulled off the same stunt with Oswin but across the whole of the opening episode of Series 7. In terms of opening episodes, I feel this was probably my favourite of the whole of RTD's era.

The Beast Below (Series 5)
Between Series 4 and the end of Series 6, this was the only in-series episode of Doctor Who penned by Moffat that didn't feature River Song. Despite my liking that character, it is always interesting to see what else Moffat has to offer. On initial viewing, I considered The Beast Below to be one of my least favourite episodes of Doctor Who ever. I now happily take that back, and think it had a lot more to do with how I hadn't yet adjusted to Moffat's era. I don't care if the man himself has even commented on it being his poorest episode (I think most of his Series 6 episodes were weaker) I absolutely love this. Liz Ten is a brilliant gun-ho character whose given a lot of substance come the episodes conclusion, the concept itself is a brilliant one sat somewhere between sci-fi and fairytale and Amy Pond shows her worth here as well. I would love to see a further adventure of the Starship UK and explore some more of the ship The soundtrack for the episode is also very good, with some of it even going on to be used in the 'Afterword' segment of Amy's last episode.

The Vampires of Venice (Series 5)
Toby Whithouse gave us an adventurous episode with some spectacular acting power here. The vampires being revealed as fish people wasn't quite what I expected, but I enjoyed it all the same. Again the score was very impressive, the story is engaging enough, and there are encouraging hints of a promising story arc woven throughout. There's not some in-depth rational reasoning for why I think this episode is very good, it just comes across that way to me.

The Curse of the Black Spot (Series 6)
This poor episode found itself wedged between the massive astronaut two-parter, and the impressive Neil Gaiman episode that people had been waiting nearly two years to see. On that front it never stood a chance, and whilst it's not a perfect episode that has a fair few errors in it as well, it's a very decent one when you give credit where it's due. Stuck to the confines of a ship for most of the story, perhaps this is insight into what an episode would be like if it was set wholly in the TARDIS console room? But the Siren is a brilliantly designed and fantastically conceived threat, whilst the ship-on-a-ship element at the end was also nicely done.

The Rings of Akhaten (Series 7)
Rose got Platform One, Martha got The Globe Theatre, Donna got Pompeii, Amy got the Starship UK and Clara got Akhaten. All of these episodes have been subjected to a more-than-average amount of criticism in some way or another, with The Rings of Akhaten probably being the least liked of the bunch. I really don't understand why though, as it presents us with a rare example of a child actor that isn't annoying, and an enchanting story that is epic and beautiful. Doctor Who has never been very good with science, and Akhaten is just up front about it. Clara is given a lot of character development here, and Matt Smith's monologuing has improved so much since Series 5. The Vigil are an impressively designed threat I only wanted to see more of, the Mummy was deliberately underwhelming and the real threat was brilliantly realised. On top of that, the episode delivers a couple of good songs that advance the plot, and really don't get in the way as much as many people made out at the time (they total less than 5 minutes between them both!). It's fun, it's eerie, it's sentimental, but it's brand new too... I loved this episode and consider it second only to The Crimson Horror in the second half of Series 7.
Exactly! You read my mind.
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Old 25-05-2013, 14:47
Yoshi Fan
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-The Long Game (I've yet to see somebody other than me who likes this episode. It's not the best by any means, but I do enjoy it a lot.)
-Gridlock.
-Voyage of the Damned.
-Planet of the Dead.
-The Beast Below
-The Curse of the Black Spot.
-A Town Call Mercy.
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Old 25-05-2013, 14:54
Talma
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Of new Who apparantly Boomtown isn't popular with some people, I have no idea why, I loved it. And 42, the Runaway Bride, the Vampires of Venice, the Ganger two-parter and the Rings of Akhaten.
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