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Old 26-06-2013, 22:46
jafsie
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I have a new TV (just out of warranty) recently it has developed a glitch.

It will run O.K for a day or a week then suddenly there is a "phut" sound and the sound goes off.

We turn off the set for 15 ish minutes and it is OK for a while.

It had been running fine for a week until tonight when there was a power cut for a few seconds and now we are back to square one.

Any ideas?
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Old 26-06-2013, 23:10
Winston_1
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I have a new TV (just out of warranty) recently it has developed a glitch.

It will run O.K for a day or a week then suddenly there is a "phut" sound and the sound goes off.

We turn off the set for 15 ish minutes and it is OK for a while.

It had been running fine for a week until tonight when there was a power cut for a few seconds and now we are back to square one.

Any ideas?
I take it you mean it just out of manufacturers warranty, 1 year.

The Sale of Goods Act gives you 6 years protection (5 in Scotland) and a TV is expected to last longer than a year.
So take it back and demand something is done about it.

Also under EU rules all electrical equipment sold in the EU has to be guaranteed for 2 years. Retailers in the UK squirm and say the UK opted out as the SOGA is better. Great, if it is better the 2 year rule must apply by definition.

Also read this:

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/b...ty-EU-law.html
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Old 27-06-2013, 03:55
jafsie
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One month out of warranty

I should have said it is a JVC LT-32DA 30J
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Old 27-06-2013, 03:56
jafsie
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Thanks Winston I will read carefully.
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Old 27-06-2013, 09:13
Nigel Goodwin
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I take it you mean it just out of manufacturers warranty, 1 year.

The Sale of Goods Act gives you 6 years protection (5 in Scotland) and a TV is expected to last longer than a year.
So take it back and demand something is done about it.

Also under EU rules all electrical equipment sold in the EU has to be guaranteed for 2 years. Retailers in the UK squirm and say the UK opted out as the SOGA is better. Great, if it is better the 2 year rule must apply by definition.
As always, READ the regulations - don't just repeat the incorrect information posted on the Internet.

However, presumably the set was bought from Comet? - as JVC stopped trading in the UK longer ago than that, and Comet bought the rights to use the name. I believe the unsold stock was bought by one of the Supermarkets following the demise of Comet?.
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Old 27-06-2013, 09:39
chrisjr
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I take it you mean it just out of manufacturers warranty, 1 year.

The Sale of Goods Act gives you 6 years protection (5 in Scotland) and a TV is expected to last longer than a year.
So take it back and demand something is done about it.

Also under EU rules all electrical equipment sold in the EU has to be guaranteed for 2 years. Retailers in the UK squirm and say the UK opted out as the SOGA is better. Great, if it is better the 2 year rule must apply by definition.

Also read this:

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/b...ty-EU-law.html
May I suggest you read these

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/...12:0016:EN:PDF

http://ec.europa.eu/consumers/cons_i...7_EN_final.pdf

The 2 year "guarantee" is actually the legal minimum protection consumers have under the directive. It may be described in the text as a guarantee but it is your basic legal rights under the law.

The SOGA gives consumers similar legal rights for 6 years (5 in Scotland) so in that respect is better than the EU directive.

http://sogahub.tradingstandards.gov.uk/sogaexplained

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1979/54

A manufacturer or retailer guarantee has no defined time limit. See Article 6 of the directive (first link) and section 9 of the second document.
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Old 27-06-2013, 10:51
Winston_1
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However, presumably the set was bought from Comet? - as JVC stopped trading in the UK longer ago than that, and Comet bought the rights to use the name. I believe the unsold stock was bought by one of the Supermarkets following the demise of Comet?.
Tesco.
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Old 27-06-2013, 18:10
Orbitalzone
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May I suggest you read these

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/...12:0016:EN:PDF

http://ec.europa.eu/consumers/cons_i...7_EN_final.pdf

The 2 year "guarantee" is actually the legal minimum protection consumers have under the directive. It may be described in the text as a guarantee but it is your basic legal rights under the law.

The SOGA gives consumers similar legal rights for 6 years (5 in Scotland) so in that respect is better than the EU directive.

http://sogahub.tradingstandards.gov.uk/sogaexplained

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1979/54

A manufacturer or retailer guarantee has no defined time limit. See Article 6 of the directive (first link) and section 9 of the second document.
Chris, this "2 year EU guarantee" that keeps being posted all over the net isn't a 2 year guarantee in the traditional sense is it? ie you can take a product back and get it fixed/replaced within 2 years of purchase but it's a 2 year time limit in the EU (excluding UK and some other countries) - meaning you can claim an item does not conform (ie it's gone wrong) within 2 years from purchase ? - but have to prove it's faulty like a UK resident could do within the 6 year claim period?

Whereas in the UK the SOGA gives UK consumers 6 years to show an item does not conform?

Page 10 on the first PDF you linked (section 6) says something to this effect. Or am I mistaken?

You see all over the place people saying everything now has a 2 year EU warrantee but I don't think it's that simple.... everything has a 1 year warranty in the old sense but UK can claim up to 6 years that it wasn't fit for purpose but EU peeps only get 2 years to do this?
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Old 27-06-2013, 18:43
Nigel Goodwin
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Chris, this "2 year EU guarantee" that keeps being posted all over the net isn't a 2 year guarantee in the traditional sense is it? ie you can take a product back and get it fixed/replaced within 2 years of purchase but it's a 2 year time limit in the EU (excluding UK and some other countries) - meaning you can claim an item does not conform (ie it's gone wrong) within 2 years from purchase ? - but have to prove it's faulty like a UK resident could do within the 6 year claim period?
Exactly - yet people here keep posting the same total rubbish about it.
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Old 27-06-2013, 19:18
jjne
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All that said, because of the two-year EU warranty (which, on the continent does generally mean that goods are guaranteed for two years rather than one), a lot of manufacturers are quite happy to repair/replace items between one and two years old at no, or nominal cost to the purchaser. I have had such service from Toshiba, Sansa and Samsung in the last five years.

Problem being that legally, both the retailer and manufacturer (both Comet in this case) are no more. Very unlikely in this case that you'll get any kind of good will on this.

Funnily enough, I was panned on HotUKDeals last year for pointing this out. It's all very well saying that the manufacturer will take care of warranty problems in the case of a store's demise, but in many cases the manufacturer has deals with the retailer, removing their obligation to the purchaser.

Alba was a prime example of this (before the name was taken over by Argos) -- they sold to retail chains on the basis that they provided no manufacturer warranty as such, and directed customers to the retailer in all cases.

(As an aside, JVC-Kenwood have not stopped trading in the UK, it's just that they have moved away from household CE and into the car radio market. Yes, yes I know -- the UK subsidiary might now be a different company, but that's not really relevant).
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Old 27-06-2013, 20:01
chrisjr
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Chris, this "2 year EU guarantee" that keeps being posted all over the net isn't a 2 year guarantee in the traditional sense is it? ie you can take a product back and get it fixed/replaced within 2 years of purchase but it's a 2 year time limit in the EU (excluding UK and some other countries) - meaning you can claim an item does not conform (ie it's gone wrong) within 2 years from purchase ? - but have to prove it's faulty like a UK resident could do within the 6 year claim period?

Whereas in the UK the SOGA gives UK consumers 6 years to show an item does not conform?

Page 10 on the first PDF you linked (section 6) says something to this effect. Or am I mistaken?

You see all over the place people saying everything now has a 2 year EU warrantee but I don't think it's that simple.... everything has a 1 year warranty in the old sense but UK can claim up to 6 years that it wasn't fit for purpose but EU peeps only get 2 years to do this?
If you read the EU directive alongside the Sale Of Goods Act they are remarkably similar. Except that the EU directive has a 2 year time limit.

Bit nowhere in the directive will you see the phrase "two year warranty" or "two year guarantee". The second EU document I linked to does use the phrase "legal guarantee" when referring to the provisions of the directive. But I don't think they mean guarantee in the sense of a bit of paper in the box giving you additional remedies over and above the legal minimum.

If it did then you could say the SoGA gives UK consumers a six year guarantee, but does anybody think it does?
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Old 27-06-2013, 20:08
Nigel Goodwin
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All that said, because of the two-year EU warranty (which, on the continent does generally mean that goods are guaranteed for two years rather than one), a lot of manufacturers are quite happy to repair/replace items between one and two years old at no, or nominal cost to the purchaser. I have had such service from Toshiba, Sansa and Samsung in the last five years.
Again, nothing to do with any fictitious EU '2 year warranty', but simply the UK SOGA.


Funnily enough, I was panned on HotUKDeals last year for pointing this out. It's all very well saying that the manufacturer will take care of warranty problems in the case of a store's demise, but in many cases the manufacturer has deals with the retailer, removing their obligation to the purchaser.
Quite a lot of the large multiples have 'bought out' the warranty from the manufacturer at various times, basically you get a cheaper trade price but then all the warranty costs are the retailers.

'Generally' if the retailer goes bankrupt the manufacturer will take the warranties back.

But in the case of Comet the TV's were sourced directly by Comet, nothing whatsoever to do with JVC UK who don't even sell TV's any more.


(As an aside, JVC-Kenwood have not stopped trading in the UK, it's just that they have moved away from household CE and into the car radio market. Yes, yes I know -- the UK subsidiary might now be a different company, but that's not really relevant).
What do you mean by JVC-Kenwood?, JVC and Kenwood are different unrelated companies, and Kenwood never even sold TV's - they pulled out of HiFi after their disastrous deal with a TV shopping channel which cost them their dealer network.
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Old 27-06-2013, 20:32
Orbitalzone
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As of 2011 JVC and Kenwood became JVCKenwood
http://www.jvckenwood.co.jp/en/

I thought JVC was owned by Matsushita but these days it's hard to keep up with who owns what brand name or division... 100% reliable wikipedia (!) says :

In December 2006, Matsushita entered talks with Kenwood and Cerberus Capital Management to sell its stake in JVC.[7] In 2007, Victor Company of Japan Ltd confirmed a strategic capital alliance with Kenwood and SPARKX Investment, resulting in Matsushita's holding being reduced to approximately 37%.[8]
In March 2008, Matsushita (Panasonic) agreed to spin off the company and merge it with Kenwood Electronics, creating JVC Kenwood Holdings on October 1, 2008.[9]

And
JVCKenwood website say: Effective October, 2011, the two companies
- Victor Company of Japan, Limited (JVC)
and Kenwood Corporation -
merged into JVCKENWOOD Corporation.
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Old 28-06-2013, 08:43
Nigel Goodwin
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As of 2011 JVC and Kenwood became JVCKenwood
Cheers for that. so it's very recent then.
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Old 28-06-2013, 11:56
jjne
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Again, nothing to do with any fictitious EU '2 year warranty', but simply the UK SOGA.
The 2 year guarantees in place elsewhere in the EU are not 'ficticious'. Sansa, for their part, explicitly referred to the fact that they were compelled to apply a 2-year warranty across the EU when I asked them if they could replace my 18 month old MP3 player whose charger connector had failed.

But in the case of Comet the TV's were sourced directly by Comet, nothing whatsoever to do with JVC UK who don't even sell TV's any more.
Yes, I know, and that is what I was telling people.

What do you mean by JVC-Kenwood?, JVC and Kenwood are different unrelated companies, and Kenwood never even sold TV's - they pulled out of HiFi after their disastrous deal with a TV shopping channel which cost them their dealer network.
Nonsense -- Kenwood pulled out of HiFi worldwide at the same time as they pulled out of the UK -- they, along with a number of other smallish Japanese HiFi makers, realised there was no longer any profit in selling properly-made, built-to-last electronics.
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Old 28-06-2013, 11:58
jjne
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Cheers for that. so it's very recent then.
If you consider five years to be "very recent", yup.
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Old 28-06-2013, 12:10
chrisjr
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The 2 year guarantees in place elsewhere in the EU are not 'ficticious'. Sansa, for their part, explicitly referred to the fact that they were compelled to apply a 2-year warranty across the EU when I asked them if they could replace my 18 month old MP3 player whose charger connector had failed.
Read the links I provided to the actual text of the EU directive. There is NO mention anywhere in it that compels anyone to offer any guarantee of any sort.

Where the directive does mention guarantees it makes no mention of what time period they should cover.
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Old 28-06-2013, 13:24
Nigel Goodwin
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If you consider five years to be "very recent", yup.
I don't quite see how the quoted date of 2011 works out to five years?
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Old 28-06-2013, 13:26
Nigel Goodwin
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The 2 year guarantees in place elsewhere in the EU are not 'ficticious'. Sansa, for their part, explicitly referred to the fact that they were compelled to apply a 2-year warranty across the EU when I asked them if they could replace my 18 month old MP3 player whose charger connector had failed.
As already mentioned READ WHAT THE ACT SAYS, don't listen to incorrect advice from CS's who generally know nothing
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Old 01-07-2013, 20:54
tellyman
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This set is likely to be fitted with a Vestel chassis. There is a known fault with the audio o/p chip on one particular type which you probably have. Should you not get any recompence from your efforts to get the set fixed under the sale of goods act, I suggest you contact a competent local engineer, who should be able to carry out the repair.
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