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Glee star Cory Monteith found dead in Canada hotel, aged 31


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Old 18-07-2013, 20:43
benjamini
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Very interesting article about heroin users and why some look more the part than others, much of what I said previously on here.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23355579
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Old 18-07-2013, 21:01
misslibertine
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Personally for me, irrespective of the fact that I loved him as an actor in Glee, it's because he tried so hard to beat his addictions and had been clean for a pretty long time and yet, ultimately, he wasn't able to because it is a disease which takes away the rational ability to control resistance.
He did so much as well in his life to warn against the dangers of drugs. He didn't sit back and do nothing, he used his fame and his fortune to try and help others, to set up charities aimed at helping youngsters who might have been in a similar place he was as a 13-year-old, he didn't hide his past, he spoke openly about being an addict, about how his fame and fortune wasn't easily come by and how he never took any of it for granted.

I think the fact that there hasn't been a bad word said about him by anyone, including the Hollywood press and paparazzi (hardly known for their acts of kindness), says it all about the type of guy he was.

Ultimately I'm just sad that he wasn't able to continue his struggle with drugs and alcohol and that he won't be around any more to entertain and inspire people to try and search for a better life and a solution to addiction.
Couldn't have put it better myself.
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Old 19-07-2013, 03:58
sam_h786
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I use to watch Glee but it wore off on me. It's very shocking to hear he lost his life at such a young age. I wasn't aware of his addiction problems til I read about them now and I respect him for being honest about them. Even though he appeared self aware of his problems however I think it must have been a constant struggle for him especially when his problems started at 13. Showbiz is no place for a child or a young person.

I read his interview about him reuniting with his dad which was sweet the way he described it and I think despite their problems as a family, Cory's father should have been allowed to see his son one last time. At the time of grief, I think you should put aside any differences and allow all to grieve x
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Old 19-07-2013, 08:32
nathanbrazil
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Showbiz is no place for a child or a young person.
Yet there are many people who find fame young and don't feel the urge to shove needles in their arm or drink themselves stupid.
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Old 19-07-2013, 08:34
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Old 19-07-2013, 08:35
nathanbrazil
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People don't bother to research these things when they're already so convinced they're right, regardless of truth.
There you go making assumptions because it suits what you wish to believe.

Yes, I was aware that Mr Monteith gave to charity. Perhaps if he'd given a bit more, he wouldn't have had so much to spend on drink and drugs.

The truth, which you seem so fond of, is that Mr Monteith died because he took drugs and drank, despite knowing full well what would happen if he continued that lifestyle. Conclusion: he liked drink and drugs more than he liked being alive. That is sad, but it also makes him a waste of space.
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Old 19-07-2013, 08:37
tommytiger
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Yet there are many people who find fame young and don't feel the urge to shove needles in their arm or drink themselves stupid.
You should think how lucky you are that you're a strong person who can resist urges, rather than berate people who aren't like you.
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Old 19-07-2013, 08:39
tommytiger
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There you go making assumptions because it suits what you wish to believe.

Yes, I was aware that Mr Monteith gave to charity. Perhaps if he'd given a bit more, he wouldn't have had so much to spend on drink and drugs.

The truth, which you seem so fond of, is that Mr Monteith died because he took drugs and drank, despite knowing full well what would happen if he continued that lifestyle. Conclusion: he liked drink and drugs more than he liked being alive. That is sad, but it also makes him a waste of space.
Look into the term 'addictive personality' and what it means.
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Old 19-07-2013, 08:51
shelleyj89
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Personally for me, irrespective of the fact that I loved him as an actor in Glee, it's because he tried so hard to beat his addictions and had been clean for a pretty long time and yet, ultimately, he wasn't able to because it is a disease which takes away the rational ability to control resistance.
He did so much as well in his life to warn against the dangers of drugs. He didn't sit back and do nothing, he used his fame and his fortune to try and help others, to set up charities aimed at helping youngsters who might have been in a similar place he was as a 13-year-old, he didn't hide his past, he spoke openly about being an addict, about how his fame and fortune wasn't easily come by and how he never took any of it for granted.

I think the fact that there hasn't been a bad word said about him by anyone, including the Hollywood press and paparazzi (hardly known for their acts of kindness), says it all about the type of guy he was.

Ultimately I'm just sad that he wasn't able to continue his struggle with drugs and alcohol and that he won't be around any more to entertain and inspire people to try and search for a better life and a solution to addiction.
Brilliant post.
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Old 19-07-2013, 10:06
Cadiva
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I use to watch Glee but it wore off on me. It's very shocking to hear he lost his life at such a young age. I wasn't aware of his addiction problems til I read about them now and I respect him for being honest about them. Even though he appeared self aware of his problems however I think it must have been a constant struggle for him especially when his problems started at 13. Showbiz is no place for a child or a young person.

I read his interview about him reuniting with his dad which was sweet the way he described it and I think despite their problems as a family, Cory's father should have been allowed to see his son one last time. At the time of grief, I think you should put aside any differences and allow all to grieve x
He didn't get into showbiz at a young age, his struggles with addiction began aged 13 because of a troubled home life and problems at school.

That's from last year, someone's just posted it again and so the news sites have picked it up as if it's new. It's from a flight he was on from Japan to Vancouver in 2012.

Yet there are many people who find fame young and don't feel the urge to shove needles in their arm or drink themselves stupid.
There are very few young people who find fame who don't, at one point or another, have issues with some form of addiction.

Conclusion: he liked drink and drugs more than he liked being alive. That is sad, but it also makes him a waste of space.
Conclusion: Addition is a disease and you're incredibly ill informed and judgemental.
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Old 19-07-2013, 10:38
rolergirl
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Originally Posted by nathanbrazil
"Conclusion: he liked drink and drugs more than he liked being alive. That is sad, but it also makes him a waste of space."
.......................................................

WOW...JUST WOW!!!
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Old 19-07-2013, 11:27
nathanbrazil
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You should think how lucky you are that you're a strong person who can resist urges, rather than berate people who aren't like you.
Oh grow up, please. Millions upon millions of ordinary decent folk 'resist urges' every day, without any special training. Or, for the most part, understand that taking heroin is never going to be a good idea.

Mr Monteith was supposedly a grown up, yet continually did things which ultimately destroyed his life. There is no easy excuse, he was an idiot and should therefore not be held up as a victim.
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Old 19-07-2013, 11:33
LondonGirl25
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Oh grow up, please. Millions upon millions of ordinary decent folk 'resist urges' every day, without any special training. Or, for the most part, understand that taking heroin is never going to be a good idea.

Mr Monteith was supposedly a grown up, yet continually did things which ultimately destroyed his life. There is no easy excuse, he was an idiot and should therefore not be held up as a victim.
I think you are missing the point. Cory wasn't an adult when he became addicted to drugs. He was 13. Did you make adult decisions at 13?! He was a child and for whatever reason he was driven to drugs. He fought that addiction until the age of 31.

By the time he became an adult he had been addicted to drugs for several years, he obviously did try to beat his addiction and was very open about it and it is incredibly sad that he didn't beat his addiction.
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Old 19-07-2013, 11:34
puppylove7
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Oh grow up, please. Millions upon millions of ordinary decent folk 'resist urges' every day, without any special training. Or, for the most part, understand that taking heroin is never going to be a good idea.

Mr Monteith was supposedly a grown up, yet continually did things which ultimately destroyed his life. There is no easy excuse, he was an idiot and should therefore not be held up as a victim.
I agree that drug taking is a really bad thing but some people can't stop. Cory obviously wanted to as he voluntarily went into rehab.
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Old 19-07-2013, 11:34
AdelaideGirl
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There are a couple of threads in this message board that really show the best and worst in people. While there is some ignorance there is also some wonderful compassionate humanity. You are beautiful people and your families are lucky.
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Old 19-07-2013, 12:36
LondonGirl25
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There are a couple of threads in this message board that really show the best and worst in people. While there is some ignorance there is also some wonderful compassionate humanity. You are beautiful people and your families are lucky.
Very true and well said
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Old 19-07-2013, 12:41
sam_h786
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He didn't get into showbiz at a young age, his struggles with addiction began aged 13 because of a troubled home life and problems at school. .
Thanks Cadiva! I wasnt fully aware of that. However being in Showbiz must have given him more access to alcohol and drugs. The temptation was there always unfortunately and sadly his body gave out. Using for that long and getting help to overcome his addictions was most likely very difficult for all involved.

x
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Old 19-07-2013, 13:04
wilehelmas
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There you go making assumptions because it suits what you wish to believe.

Yes, I was aware that Mr Monteith gave to charity. Perhaps if he'd given a bit more, he wouldn't have had so much to spend on drink and drugs.

The truth, which you seem so fond of, is that Mr Monteith died because he took drugs and drank, despite knowing full well what would happen if he continued that lifestyle. Conclusion: he liked drink and drugs more than he liked being alive. That is sad, but it also makes him a waste of space.
It doesn't make him a 'waste of space' imo. It makes him a person with problems who tried hard to keep it from being anyone else's problem.

I often take a hard line on drugs, yes they are a choice for most, no you don't have to take them, yes there is superb help for people out there, sometimes it still doesn't work.

It's life. I think it would be fairer to say he 'wasted' his chance, probably by choice, not that he himself was a waste of space. You'd have probably seen a nice guy who you thought was decent had you met him. His death serves as a reminder that we're still assuming clean cut wealthy people that 'look great' often aren't. That drugs problems transcend class and culture.
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Old 19-07-2013, 13:23
MissPinotGrigio
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It doesn't make him a 'waste of space' imo. It makes him a person with problems who tried hard to keep it from being anyone else's problem.

I often take a hard line on drugs, yes they are a choice for most, no you don't have to take them, yes there is superb help for people out there, sometimes it still doesn't work.

It's life. I think it would be fairer to say he 'wasted' his chance, probably by choice, not that he himself was a waste of space. You'd have probably seen a nice guy who you thought was decent had you met him. His death serves as a reminder that we're still assuming clean cut wealthy people that 'look great' often aren't. That drugs problems transcend class and culture.
Completely agree with this, very well said.

I have controversial opinions on addiction - I think a lot of damage is being done by referring to it as an "illness", it's not, it's a symptom of a lifestyle choice. Calling it an illness absolves the addict of responsibility for their actions and recovery and is probably responsible for most deaths through addiction IMHO.

And again, drugs can make you do bad things if you lack the money to maintain your addiction. Cory himself said that he only got the initial help when he was 19 after he stole some money from someone close to him (possibly a family member). His success with "Glee" has prevented the need for him to do that. By the looks of things, like many addicts, he's a good guy who was spurred to do bad things when on drugs (double life). Some addicts turn to a permanent bad side and "thrive" on that lifestyle (violent alcoholics, granny-mugging crackheads etc). Quite a few others just do drugs quietly for fear they may be "found out", or that any chaos or harsh realities enter their lives.

It does make you waste your life, but none of them are a waste of space. After all, look at James Taylor, Elton John, Boy George, David Bowie. All recovering addicts?
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Old 19-07-2013, 13:26
tommytiger
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Oh grow up, please. Millions upon millions of ordinary decent folk 'resist urges' every day, without any special training. Or, for the most part, understand that taking heroin is never going to be a good idea.

Mr Monteith was supposedly a grown up, yet continually did things which ultimately destroyed his life. There is no easy excuse, he was an idiot and should therefore not be held up as a victim.
I'm fully aware that some people on forums are only interested in having their opinion seen and have no intention of changing their opinion, however misguided and inappropriate their opinion is seen by others.

I've grown up, I became non-judgemental, I understand that as humans we all make mistakes and nobody is perfect.
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Old 19-07-2013, 13:29
AdelaideGirl
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Don't think that calling it an illness absolves the addict of responsibility but clearly classifies it as a medical problem rather than a criminal one. A diabetic has an illness and also takes responsibility for getting the right treatment, eating the right food etc.
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Old 19-07-2013, 13:36
MissPinotGrigio
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Don't think that calling it an illness absolves the addict of responsibility but clearly classifies it as a medical problem rather than a criminal one. A diabetic has an illness and also takes responsibility for getting the right treatment, eating the right food etc.
Sorry, AdelaideGirl, I don't buy that.

If I have a cold/get diagnosed with diabetes, cancer etc., I, and most folk will do everything I can do get better the minute I don't feel well and know what I've got.

If I'm addicted to drugs though, I know I am, and this could go on for years until a/ I can't take any more and really do want to quit b/ I die c/ become incapacitated. That's why I think calling it an illness absolves the user of self-responsibility for getting better. For any illness, it's ultimately you who has to either will yourself better, or go to the docs/hospital/ask someone to get you medication or get it yourself. But with an addiction it can go on and on and on for years, and I know a lot of addicts who think it's an illness and therefore someone will come along and "cure" them someday, or help them get better, so they don't have to do anything.

Sorry - I just think it's very damaging treatment. That, and forcing people into rehab when they're not ready or willing.
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Old 19-07-2013, 14:06
Cadiva
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Oh grow up, please. Millions upon millions of ordinary decent folk 'resist urges' every day, without any special training. Or, for the most part, understand that taking heroin is never going to be a good idea.

Mr Monteith was supposedly a grown up, yet continually did things which ultimately destroyed his life. There is no easy excuse, he was an idiot and should therefore not be held up as a victim.
And where has anyone said he was a victim? He died because he drank alcohol and took some heroin. He is the one responsible for making that choice. However, given his experiences with alcohol and drugs began at the age of 13, that he entered rehab aged 19, that he chose to get clean shortly after a near death experience at that same age and that he had 10 years clean before relapsing (for whatever reason no-one knows but the pressures of fame could have contributed to it) only this year, I think referring to him as a waste of space is not only wrong but shows an utter lack of understanding of addiction.

Sorry, AdelaideGirl, I don't buy that.

If I have a cold/get diagnosed with diabetes, cancer etc., I, and most folk will do everything I can do get better the minute I don't feel well and know what I've got.

If I'm addicted to drugs though, I know I am, and this could go on for years until a/ I can't take any more and really do want to quit b/ I die c/ become incapacitated. That's why I think calling it an illness absolves the user of self-responsibility for getting better. For any illness, it's ultimately you who has to either will yourself better, or go to the docs/hospital/ask someone to get you medication or get it yourself. But with an addiction it can go on and on and on for years, and I know a lot of addicts who think it's an illness and therefore someone will come along and "cure" them someday, or help them get better, so they don't have to do anything.

Sorry - I just think it's very damaging treatment. That, and forcing people into rehab when they're not ready or willing.
I think there's confusion over the use of the word illness. Addiction is a disease, it's a problem in the stimuli which feed the brain and which, in most people, they are able to control. An addict isn't able to control their addiction because they become unable to rationalise about it. It isn't always "bad things" that people are addicted to either, or things which can kill them. I know people who are addicted to shopping, buying things they know they will never use or wear, often leaving the items still with their tags on in carrier bags stuffed in the wardrobe.

I do, however, agree with you that ultimately it is the addict who has to want to change and that unless they have made that decision, any kind of treatment will be useless.
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Old 19-07-2013, 14:18
asyousay
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Did Cory really want to Quit when he went into Rehab in April, if he was addicted to Heroin and back boozing and whatever else he was using then a month in rehab was never enough time to clean up his act and that points to it being half arsed imo.

My mum for just booze was in Rehab for 6 months because the detox alone took ages, then it made her ill and so on. Then intensive therapy for months and she has now been sober 13 years.

If you want to get clean it takes longer then "1" month from what i saw and have seen from my mum.


The fact he was back out and off on holiday and so on points to it not working imo - it was just we never knew how bad his addiction was.
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Old 19-07-2013, 14:51
film_fan
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I think the circumstances surrounding when it happened should be considered as well tho.

From reading things in the press etc, I think you do very much get the impression that he did want to get clean.

Like the article about the 'leading a double live' - clean in LA / back to his partying ways in Canda.

When he is back in Canada, hanging around with the same friends - who possibly don't support his sober / drug free life - has he lost the support that he normally receives when in LA.

Purely speculating but:

He had been in Canada since the 6th July (i'm sure that's the date i read), there have been some pictures where he doesn't look like he is on drugs. I think he also met up with his agent or someone for Tea the day before - and from all accounts seemed happy / healthy and not using.

So I wonder if he had really been trying to avoid slipping back in his old ways.

But then on his last night in Canada he meets up with some friends and decides to go for a drink - which ends up being a heavy night (as its his last night in Canada for a while maybe?!?) - he ends up back in the same crowd where he can get hold of anything he needs to.

When people are drunk it's far easier to loose that self control.

Obviously this is just purely speculating...and possibly a load of rubbish.

I think that calling him a waste of space is wrong. I was watching interviews with him last night - and he always seemed happy and kind to the people he was with.

I don't know why his death has shocked me (and bothered me) more than any other celebrity death...but it has.
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