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BBC2 to Screen German ''Band of Brothers''


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Old 20-08-2013, 17:54
Doghouse Riley
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A straw man argument that seems to be deployed as routine in such discussions.

I also don't subscribe to that view - that would just be silly wouldn't it? However the BBC has only imported the best Euro shows (usually on BBC4) which of course happen to be subbed - which I'm personally glad about as wouldn't want dubbing. There will also be tons of Euro shows which are rubbish that we don't see (thankfully).

Anyway back to the actual subject of the thread! Somehow I've missed this thread before now but this show sounds good and will certainly be watching it.
Sorry, it isn't a straw man argument. It's a valid point as often that can be the view of some.
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Old 20-08-2013, 18:10
ilovewallander
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I guess it will be once it starts, I've already said it might be watchable, time will tell.
Yes I noticed you'd said that, in amongst the usual arguments with other posters.

I'll be watching the mini series. I give all subtitled programmes a chance, not all have been good but some have been unmissable and I'd rather have subtitles instead of dubbing. I used to think I'd miss the action if I was busy reading subs, but I've found I don't! And I'd rather have my attention on the programme rather than doing other things at the same time, you can just as easily miss things when you're multi-tasking with an English language show on though so reading some subs for an hour shouldn't be much of a hardship. I'm sure other tasks can wait for an hour or so.
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Old 20-08-2013, 18:30
farmer bob
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I sometimes find that subtitles help me to concentrate on the programme even more. Some of the best movies / tv I've enjoyed have been subtitled. Each to their own I guess.
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Old 20-08-2013, 19:20
Gort
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Err.

Tell me how school attendance would make any difference to you being able to follow the dialogue in Swedish, if you only did French at school?
Naturally, reading subtitles requires the ability to read, which school should have acquainted you with, just like being able to read posts before making replies.

Unless you're familiar with the language, you need to be constantly trying to read the subtitles and watching the action at the same time, usually for an hour without a break if you're watching it live on BBC..
It's not hard to read and watch at the same time. Really, it's not hard at all and is pretty basic. I actually think that there might be something in the quip I made about bunking off school if you have such difficulty.

The only thing that you can't do while watching a subtitled programme is write posts on DS at the same time as watching, etc. Still, seeing that I don't partake in such activity, I'll leave that for others to lament.

On that note, I'll say that I hope this is the next Das Boot and bow out of this thread for now.
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Old 20-08-2013, 20:31
Doghouse Riley
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Naturally, reading subtitles requires the ability to read, which school should have acquainted you with, just like being able to read posts before making replies.



It's not hard to read and watch at the same time. Really, it's not hard at all and is pretty basic. I actually think that there might be something in the quip I made about bunking off school if you have such difficulty.

The only thing that you can't do while watching a subtitled programme is write posts on DS at the same time as watching, etc. Still, seeing that I don't partake in such activity, I'll leave that for others to lament.

On that note, I'll say that I hope this is the next Das Boot and bow out of this thread for now.

So finally some good news?
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Old 22-08-2013, 15:15
Petingo
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I sometimes find that subtitles help me to concentrate on the programme even more. Some of the best movies / tv I've enjoyed have been subtitled. Each to their own I guess.

This.

The fact one has to concentrate solely on the programme enhances the enjoyment, IMO.

It is so easy to lose concentration by reading a newspaper or look at the 'net when watching a programme in English.
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Old 22-08-2013, 16:38
Doghouse Riley
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This.

The fact one has to concentrate solely on the programme enhances the enjoyment, IMO.

It is so easy to lose concentration by reading a newspaper or look at the 'net when watching a programme in English.
I'd agree, but it has to be really good for it to be worth giving it my complete attention.

I was very impressed with the first series of Wallander (the one with the late Johanna Sällström in the cast) and said so on here.
My point has always been that sadly, not all of these sub-titled series are that good, but then I guess that's subjective. In any event, as I found them disappointing, I've not bothered with the more recent ones on BBC4.

I said before, this one might be good but I'm reserving judgement.

Sub-titled foreign dramas will be selected, as much for their comparatively low cost in these, their self-inflicted tough financial times by the BBC, as for their dramatic quality. The number of them screened is testimony to that.
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Old 22-08-2013, 16:40
mossy2103
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<snipped> ..... in these, their self-inflicted tough financial times by the BBC,
So the 6-year Licence Fee freeze was self-inflicted?
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Old 22-08-2013, 16:47
Doghouse Riley
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So the 6-year Licence Fee freeze was self-inflicted?
I've said this so many times.
Any company in the private sector would "give their right arm" to know on January 1st what their total income for the whole year would likely to be. If you then know what it will also be for the next several years, managing the finances is so much easier, rather than having to make "informed guesses, as most companies do.
The BBC has been in this position and has a proven record of not managing our money well. It's so easy for them to lose the plot as it's not their, but our cash they are spending.

The government knew they were living in a world of their own, compared to the rest of us, hence the freeze. So yes, in my opinion, it was self-inflicted.
.
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Old 22-08-2013, 16:51
mossy2103
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I've said this so many times.
Any company in the private sector would "give their right arm" to know on January 1st what their total income for the whole year would likely to be. If you then know what it will also be for the next several years, managing the finances is so much easier, rather than having to make "informed guesses, as most companies do.
The BBC has been in this position and has a proven record of not managing our money well. It's so easy for them to lose the plot as it's not their, but our cash they are spending.

.
All of which might be true, but has nothing to do with a 6-year LF freeze (and the resultant drop in real income over that time) and how the BBC supposedly inflicted this upon itself.


Edit: Ah, I see that you have added an additional line.

Edit no.2: The Telegraph reported it rather differently:

BBC ordered to accept six-year freeze in licence fee

The BBC has been forced to accept a six-year freeze in the licence fee and take on extra funding commitments as part of the Government’s austerity measures.

<snipped>

George Osborne, the Chancellor, has also extracted a commitment from the BBC to spend less on its website. The Coalition will claim that it has finally forced the BBC to accept some responsibility to tighten its belt at a time of national austerity.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/t...cence-fee.html
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Old 22-08-2013, 17:34
Doghouse Riley
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All of which might be true, but has nothing to do with a 6-year LF freeze (and the resultant drop in real income over that time) and how the BBC supposedly inflicted this upon itself.


Edit: Ah, I see that you have added an additional line.

Edit no.2: The Telegraph reported it rather differently:


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/t...cence-fee.html
The "suits" at the BBC should have been aware the way the economy was going and anticipated that there would be some restrictions on their spending. Many private sector companies would have done as much.
Trouble is, old habits and extravagances die hard with people who have never had to earn the cash they're spending.

A letter in a paper the other day suggested "downsizing" the BBC and giving half the four billion to the NHS. Seems a bit drastic as that organisation can waste a lot of cash. But it shows that some people now think the BBC is a bloated monolith.
There are now so many other channels that I can always find something worth watching. I and I'm sure, as are many, not so dependent on the BBC for TV entertainment.
I rarely watch anything on BBC1.
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Old 22-08-2013, 18:00
MikeySaint859
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There are now so many other channels that I can always find something worth watching.
Yeah, Doghouse, but you are easily pleased.
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Old 22-08-2013, 18:10
Doghouse Riley
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Yeah, Doghouse, but you are easily pleased.
Yes, this is true!
I've just added another non-BBC drama to my viewing list, "Low Winter Sun" which from the first episode, looks promising.
Fortunately, it doesn't involve having to read sub-titles.
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Old 22-08-2013, 19:40
mossy2103
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The "suits" at the BBC should have been aware the way the economy was going and anticipated that there would be some restrictions on their spending.
They didn't (but were subsequently forced to) - however the outcome would have been the same - and that outcome would have been because of the economy (as you have stated), not because of the BBC. So whichever way, it was not self-inflicted. As you have just pointed out, it was "the way the economy was going".

Mind you, I can't bring to mind any other business or organisation who reined in their spending plans or underwent large-scale redundancies ahead of the downturn. They all seemed to wait until after the downturn/credit crisis hit.

A letter in a paper the other day suggested "downsizing" the BBC and giving half the four billion to the NHS. Seems a bit drastic as that organisation can waste a lot of cash. But it shows that some people now think the BBC is a bloated monolith.
Some people have always thought that - there will always be some who see an opportunity to advance a long-held belief, or who simply jump on the bandwagon - a few letters are not likely to be that representative when viewed against the backdrop of how many still regularly watch (and appreciate) BBC content (on TV, radio or online). But that's for another thread.
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Old 22-08-2013, 20:43
rifleman
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Great more German re-enactors next year! as if there isn't enough of them already!!!!
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Old 22-08-2013, 21:45
Doghouse Riley
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They didn't (but were subsequently forced to) - however the outcome would have been the same - and that outcome would have been because of the economy (as you have stated), not because of the BBC. So whichever way, it was not self-inflicted. As you have just pointed out, it was "the way the economy was going".

Mind you, I can't bring to mind any other business or organisation who reined in their spending plans or underwent large-scale redundancies ahead of the downturn. They all seemed to wait until after the downturn/credit crisis hit.

Some people have always thought that - there will always be some who see an opportunity to advance a long-held belief, or who simply jump on the bandwagon - a few letters are not likely to be that representative when viewed against the backdrop of how many still regularly watch (and appreciate) BBC content (on TV, radio or online). But that's for another thread.
You've said it yourself, "they were forced." They'd have carried on in their own little bubble and recent information dragged out of them under the FOIA, showed that some have still carried on as if money were no object.
Peter Fincham said on his first day in the job for the BBC, expressing concern over whether enough cash was available to do the job, was told; "You'll have difficulty spending the budget."
That mentality is totally senseless. It's since been revealed that when he went, he'd have needed a wheelbarrow to take his "wedge" away, it was so over the top.

Well run companies in the private sector, often anticipate future problems and take remedial action in advance, it's a way of protecting the share price as investors get jumpy if sudden massive redundancies are effected.

The BBC still make some good programmes, but they're carrying too much "baggage."

Obviously there's a core of people for whom the BBC can do no wrong, as it's always been "there."

But as you say, all this is really for another thread.
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Old 22-08-2013, 21:50
Doghouse Riley
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Great more German re-enactors next year! as if there isn't enough of them already!!!!
Well, if this is even only a partial success, there'll likely be "another one along in a minute."
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Old 23-08-2013, 07:15
mossy2103
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Well run companies in the private sector, often anticipate future problems and take remedial action in advance, it's a way of protecting the share price as investors get jumpy if sudden massive redundancies are effected.
Were there any?

I can't think of any that did that prior to the banking crisis and ensuing economic downturn. Indeed, large parts of industry simply reacted to that downturn.
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Old 23-08-2013, 10:15
Justabloke
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Its interesting reading the "controversy" about subtitles in this thread, I don't personnly have a problem with them, I find that I don't even notice I'm reading them if the show itself is absorbing.

The point I was going to make was this; its quite ironic that people are arguing about subtitles on a german TV programme because a German friend of mine complains that German TV always dub non German shows and how much he hates it.
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Old 23-08-2013, 11:54
andy1231
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They always have. I remember an East German Import in the 1960's "The Singing Ringing Tree" that was shown on the BBC just before Blue Peter. That Scared the living Daylights out of me.

Hope the BBC shows more imports from the Continent.
I loved The Singing Ringing Tree - looking back at it now it seems so sureal.
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Old 23-08-2013, 14:16
Cadiva
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They always have. I remember an East German Import in the 1960's "The Singing Ringing Tree" that was shown on the BBC just before Blue Peter. That Scared the living Daylights out of me.

Hope the BBC shows more imports from the Continent.
Oh, I remember The Singing Rain Tree, I think they must have repeated that in the 1970s.
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Old 31-01-2014, 20:34
saythatagain
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I've just watched this show (with English subtitles) and it's one of the best things I've ever seen on TV. Incredible stuff.

If you like the swedish Wallander, Das Boot etc you will love this.

I don't know when it's coming on BBC2 but I would urge you all to watch it.
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Old 17-04-2014, 12:56
Bio Max
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starts on BBC2 on Saturday 26th April! At last. The trailer is fantastic, can't wait to watch it.

p.s. could a mod change the title to 'Generation War' ?
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Old 17-04-2014, 13:56
Trsvis_Bickle
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Well if it's as good as "Das Boot" then its going to be worth a watch. Wonder what theatre of war they will show, I assume 'Eastern Front" so it doesn't upset western viewers.
If it's even half as good as Das Boot, it'll be worth watching. That was one of the best war films ever made.

Will definitely look out for this.
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Old 17-04-2014, 14:05
degsyhufc
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starts on BBC2 on Saturday 26th April! At last. The trailer is fantastic, can't wait to watch it.

p.s. could a mod change the title to 'Generation War' ?
Do you think the mods go though every thread looking for requests?

Contact them and ask them to change the title.
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