Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 

Prisoners


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 24-01-2014, 08:25
Will2911
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 285

Is it just me, or does it annoy other people too when British people say they don't like Foreign film and then start listing American Pictures as their favourites... I'm like hang on, you said you didn't like Foreign film yet you love all these American films...
Will2911 is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 24-01-2014, 08:28
Thunder Lips
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,553
No it doesn't annoy me because I know what they mean and see no reason to be a pedant about it.
Thunder Lips is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 08:35
Will2911
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 285
No it doesn't annoy me because I know what they mean and see no reason to be a pedant about it.
It should annoy you as it is another sign of creeping American Cultural Imperialism
Will2911 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 09:00
Chasing Shadows
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,104
It should annoy you as it is another sign of creeping American Cultural Imperialism
Until Americans start speaking a language other than English I think we'll be fine considering Hollywood movies as not being "foreign" films - if that's okay with you?
Chasing Shadows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 09:05
Will2911
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 285
Until Americans start speaking a language other than English I think we'll be fine considering Hollywood movies as not being "foreign" films - if that's okay with you?
Nope not okay, there are big cultural differences. And I feel that American films need to be treated the same as Non English language cinema and given smaller and limited releases
Will2911 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 09:08
Chasing Shadows
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,104
Nope not okay, there are big cultural differences. And I feel that American films need to be treated the same as Non English language cinema and given smaller and limited releases
Do you? Ah well, never mind, eh? You continue feeling like that - and the rest of us will carry on with how we feel. Then everyone's happy.
Chasing Shadows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 09:13
Fairyprincess0
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,887
Yeah. But tend to idolise u.s. Films at the expense of the British film industry. Britian had a brilliant film industry until the early 80's. Things are better then they were. But the British people could still appricitate there own movie culture more.....

10 British films every Brit should watch.....

1. Matter of life and death
2. Brighton rock
3. Black narcissist
4. Telstar
5. Damned united
6. Harry brown
7. If
8. Monty python's life of Brian
9. The rebel
10. Ice cold in Alex

10 cult films British films every Brit should watch

1. The devils
2. Rocky horror picture show
3. Seance on a wet afternoon
4. Photographing faries
5. Serbian sound studio
6. Tommy
7. Peeping Tom
8. Bloody kids
9. Women in love
10. Leauge of gentlemen (1950's)
Fairyprincess0 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 09:42
Mark A
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 4,094
And there's also the tricky problem of what exactly is a British film? How many are wholly financed and shot in the UK and staring and made by nothing but British talent? Not too many I would think.

Regards

Mark
Mark A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 11:28
Takae
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 8,274
Is it just me, or does it annoy other people too when British people say they don't like Foreign film and then start listing American Pictures as their favourites... I'm like hang on, you said you didn't like Foreign film yet you love all these American films...
Technically, the classification is based on language, not country.

From English-language speakers' point of view, a film that uses English language as its main language isn't 'foreign'.
From French-language speakers' point of view, a film that uses French language as its main language isn't 'foreign'.

If a Scottish film has a Gaelic language as its main language, it can be classified as a foreign film within the UK.

That aside: yes, it does annoy me sometimes when people's favourite-film lists consist nothing but U.S. films. Well, not annoyed. More along the line of 'How boring.' Especially when there are English-language films from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Ireland, the Philippines, etc.

Last edited by Takae : 24-01-2014 at 11:35. Reason: Clearing up my grammatical mess
Takae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 11:29
Takae
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 8,274
And there's also the tricky problem of what exactly is a British film? How many are wholly financed and shot in the UK and staring and made by nothing but British talent? Not too many I would think.
You can say the same thing about many 'American' films as well, actually. Not just British and American films, but also just about every country in the world.
Takae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 11:50
Johnny Clay
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,907
It should annoy you as it is another sign of creeping American Cultural Imperialism
Indeed. Damn Yanks and their 'film industry'.

How dare they create and market these things successfully.
Johnny Clay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 11:51
Mystical123
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 11,369
Nope not okay, there are big cultural differences. And I feel that American films need to be treated the same as Non English language cinema and given smaller and limited releases
There are cultural differences between English films and Scottish films, does that make one or the other of those foreign?

Defining a film as being from any one country is inherently problematic in the modern world of international financing, filming etc. Look at the Best British Film nominees at the BAFTAs this year, for example - all but one I believe was at least part financed or had major roles (directing, producing or acting) played by non-Brits. Doesn't make them any less British in the eyes of the British Academy, and shows quite clearly that a truly 'British' film is a misnomer in itself.

If you want to be pedantic, then the full meaning of foreign films is really 'foreign language films', but no-one bothers saying the whole thing unless it's at the major awards shows.
Mystical123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 12:21
whedon247
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 13,785
they speak english in their films and thats not a foreign language to most brits.
whedon247 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 13:00
Will2911
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 285
Indeed. Damn Yanks and their 'film industry'.

How dare they create and market these things successfully.
Indeed. This is like when a Tesco comes to a small town and puts all the local business into trouble and eventually means they have to close down. This is what the American film industry will do to ours
Will2911 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 13:21
Johnny Clay
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,907
Indeed. This is like when a Tesco comes to a small town and puts all the local business into trouble and eventually means they have to close down. This is what the American film industry will do to ours
There's your key word. Business carves its own path regardless, always will. The Film business will be no different.

But we've always had US films in our cinemas, and the UK film industry was dying during the seventies due to its inability to keep up with changes in both film-making and audience demands. Doubtless there are other factors, but we just couldn't compete. And if there's an assumption that the Brit film industry would've flourished without the omnipresence of US films then I'd have to disagree. Success is down to broad appeal, something US cinema obviously knows a lot about but where we often falter badly.
Johnny Clay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 14:15
Residents Fan
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 5,062
Until Americans start speaking a language other than English I think we'll be fine considering Hollywood movies as not being "foreign" films - if that's okay with you?
By that logic, Canadian and Australian films don't count as
"foreign" either.

Usually, when I think of "foreign" films, I usually think of
non-English language ones.


That aside: yes, it does annoy me sometimes when people's favourite-film lists consist nothing but U.S. films. Well, not annoyed. More along the line of 'How boring.' Especially when there are English-language films from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Ireland, the Philippines, etc.
There's also quite a few US films made outside the Hollywood
system (Kenneth Anger's output, David Lynch's
"Eraserhead", "Sex Lies and Videotape", etc.)
Residents Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 22:40
JimothyD
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 5,023
Is it just me, or does it annoy other people too when British people say they don't like Foreign film and then start listing American Pictures as their favourites... I'm like hang on, you said you didn't like Foreign film yet you love all these American films...
What about 'American' films that are choc full of British actors and have British directors, producers and technicians? There are plenty of examples of these. Do you count these as 'foreign films'?

I think this thread is missing a key word - 'language'. As in foreign language film.
JimothyD is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2014, 22:50
theonlyweeman
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,214
And there's also the tricky problem of what exactly is a British film? How many are wholly financed and shot in the UK and staring and made by nothing but British talent? Not too many I would think.

Regards

Mark
That's a can of worms you don't want to open.

For example Seven Psychopaths, funded by the British Film Institute and Film4. Writern and Directed by Martin McDonagh, who has joint British-Irish citizenship, but shot in America using primarily American actors (aside from Irishman Colin Farrel).

Most places consider it a British film, but if you didn't know anything about it and didn't see the BFI credit it would look like an American film...
theonlyweeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2014, 02:18
treefr0g
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 7,950
I'm not a big fan of foreign films with the exception of 'Star Wars' which I thought was very good for a foreign film.
treefr0g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2014, 02:33
treefr0g
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 7,950
And there's also the tricky problem of what exactly is a British film? How many are wholly financed and shot in the UK and staring and made by nothing but British talent? Not too many I would think.

Regards

Mark
The closest I can think of is Harry Potter.

Thanks to J K Rowling, the UK is almost wholly responsible for the most successful movie franchise in the history of movies.
treefr0g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2014, 08:33
dee123
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 13,642
It should annoy you as it is another sign of creeping American Cultural Imperialism
I come here to escape the 10 million threads about this in General Discussion. Not here too!
dee123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2014, 09:44
Mark A
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 4,094
The closest I can think of is Harry Potter
All American financed I'm afraid, and most of the directors have been non-British.

Regards

Mark
Mark A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2014, 13:43
CLL Dodge
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The Green Hills of Earth
Posts: 71,266
There is a resistance to foreign language (i.e. subtitled) films.
CLL Dodge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2014, 13:46
CLL Dodge
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The Green Hills of Earth
Posts: 71,266
All American financed I'm afraid, and most of the directors have been non-British.

Regards

Mark
Though made in Britain with a British producer and a wholly British cast. They count as ours, albeit co-productions with foreign finance.

But nobody regards Columbia pictures as Japanese.
CLL Dodge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2014, 13:53
treefr0g
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 7,950
Though made in Britain with a British producer and a wholly British cast. They count as ours, albeit co-productions with foreign finance.

But nobody regards Columbia pictures as Japanese.
Yes. This is what I meant.

I don't think we'll ever be able to fully finance a film of this scale but it showed that we are able to produce films of this scale.
treefr0g is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 21:04.