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Should I get rid of my Freeview reciever in the New Year?


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Old 09-10-2013, 16:52
Neil_Norton
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I find that my partner and I listen to the radio a lot, watch DVDs, read books and play computer games.

The only things we watch on Freeview are "Birds of a Feather", "2.4 Children" and "Silent Witness" repeats on Drama, "Citizen Khan" on BBC1 and "Some Girls", "Bad Education" and "Family Guy" on BBC3.

Bare in mind, a lot of these are repeats and these will probably run out in the New year and be replaced with something else.

I can watch "Call The Midwife" (my other fav programme) on I-Player and to be fair, I can absolutely not afford the television licence due to the cuts. I feel there is little on and barely anything interests me.

Should we actually ditch the Freeview reciever in the New Year or just keep it on?
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Old 09-10-2013, 17:01
rikstan87
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I believe you still need a license to watch I player?
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Old 09-10-2013, 17:04
chrisjr
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I believe you still need a license to watch I player?
Only if you watch the live streams of the BBC channels.

If you only watch programmes using the catch-up feature when they are not being broadcast live you do not need a licence.
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Old 09-10-2013, 17:04
kasg
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I believe you still need a license to watch I player?
Not for catch-up you don't, only if you are watching live TV.

Edit: snap!
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Old 09-10-2013, 17:07
Neil_Norton
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Phew, at least that's a relief with the licence.
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Old 09-10-2013, 17:54
rikstan87
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Only if you watch the live streams of the BBC channels.

If you only watch programmes using the catch-up feature when they are not being broadcast live you do not need a licence.
Not for catch-up you don't, only if you are watching live TV.

Edit: snap!
Fair enough!
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Old 09-10-2013, 18:01
chrisy
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Only if you watch the live streams of the BBC channels.

If you only watch programmes using the catch-up feature when they are not being broadcast live you do not need a licence.
I wish they'd change that. There was a mention in another thread about "freeloaders who don't have a TV licence as they watch everything delayed on iPlayer". These people should be contributing to the programmes they are watching. Make everybody link their TV licence to an iPlayer account, perhaps have a discounted rate for iPlayer-only (although I fail to see why it should be discounted, other than a reduction in proportion to the amount the broadcast chain costs)

That would sort out some of the funding issues where the government keeps cutting back on how much TV licence money the BBC gets.
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Old 09-10-2013, 19:09
Neil_Norton
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Erm...so I am being called a freeloader all because I dont want broadcast TV?

Is the BBC paying some of you "licence lovers" on comission? Nice to know where the fee is going...on top of that if there was HIGH quality programming instead of it going on a dead soap and turkeys.
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Old 09-10-2013, 19:34
jj20x
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Erm...so I am being called a freeloader all because I dont want broadcast TV?
Could it be because you appear to still want to watch the content on iplayer but don't want to contribute to funding the service?
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Old 09-10-2013, 19:54
Colin_London
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Erm...so I am being called a freeloader all because I dont want broadcast TV?

Is the BBC paying some of you "licence lovers" on comission? Nice to know where the fee is going...on top of that if there was HIGH quality programming instead of it going on a dead soap and turkeys.
If the content is so bad then why are you watching anything on iPlayer, delayed or otherwise?

So I guess you are pleased to hear that the BBC will be spending more on Arts programming in future?
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Old 09-10-2013, 20:16
TYCO
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From what you listed you watch a lot of TV - about an hour a day. I don't think you should watch any more than that. I watch Dragon's Den and X Factor, then the Apprentice when it's on. Occasionally the news.
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Old 09-10-2013, 21:27
TelevisionUser
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Phew, at least that's a relief with the licence.
Here is the full guidance: http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one

You need to be covered by a valid TV Licence if you watch or record TV as it's being broadcast. This includes the use of devices such as a computer, laptop, mobile phone or DVD/video recorder.
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Old 09-10-2013, 21:31
chrisjr
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And here

http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-i...d-online-top8/

Exception: If you only watch catch-up services online, then you donít need a licence. For example, you donít need one to use BBC iPlayer, or ITV player, to catch up on programmes after they have been shown on TV.
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Old 09-10-2013, 22:49
Gary_LandyFan
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Erm...so I am being called a freeloader all because I dont want broadcast TV?

Is the BBC paying some of you "licence lovers" on comission? Nice to know where the fee is going...on top of that if there was HIGH quality programming instead of it going on a dead soap and turkeys.
No, technically you are being called a freeloader because you will not be paying for the programming yet you will still be watching it via the iPlayer.

Which you are quite entitled to do though.

Although you say you can't afford to pay the licence fee cost, there are those that choose not to get a TV Licence (but can afford to do so) and watch the programming for free instead.
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Old 09-10-2013, 22:51
Gary_LandyFan
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From what you listed you watch a lot of TV - about an hour a day. I don't think you should watch any more than that. I watch Dragon's Den and X Factor, then the Apprentice when it's on. Occasionally the news.
Now for that you deserve to tortured

Oh wait by watching that you already are
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Old 11-10-2013, 10:48
malpasc
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If you can't afford the TV licence, how may I ask can you afford a PC/laptop and a broadband connection in order to watch the iPlayer?
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Old 11-10-2013, 14:24
lbear
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The BBC terms and conditions state:

"You may not watch television programmes using BBC Online Services on any device (including mobile phones, "smart" phones or devices, laptops, tablets and personal computers) at the same time (or virtually the same time) as the programmes are being broadcast, simulcast or otherwise made available by the BBC on television, unless you have a valid television licence."

So although you do not technically require a licence if you only watch on iPlayer, you may run into problems if you happen to watch, say, Eastenders at the same time it is being repeated on BBC Three. Note that using a device other than a television to watch a programme at the same time it is being broadcast requires a licence. That there is a delay caused by internet streaming etc is not a defence.

The TV licence also pays for the rest of the BBC's output, including radio.
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Old 11-10-2013, 18:41
plasticstoat
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Cant afford the licence? You don't have to pay it in one hit you know!!! And because of that I fail to believe you can't afford it - its more don't want to pay for it. Which to be fair none of us do, but hey something has to pay for the programming!
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Old 13-10-2013, 00:01
scruffpot
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on a tvl note...
I bought a 2nd hand pc monitor from the british heart foundation the other day (no tv tuner - just a standard monitor), they would not let me buy it unless I signed a tvl declaration form...

its the first time I've been asked for that, I've got a tvl license but I just made up the address and paid in cash.. as the women behind the desk got arsey with me when i asked "Why as its a monitor and it does not have a tuner", she muttered store policy and got rather defensive...
however a literally brand new hanns G 19" widescreen monitor for 10quid can't complain..
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Old 13-10-2013, 00:10
Winston_1
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on a tvl note...
I bought a 2nd hand pc monitor from the british heart foundation the other day (no tv tuner - just a standard monitor), they would not let me buy it unless I signed a tvl declaration form...
They were wrong on two counts.

1. It was a monitor.
2. Then requirement to sign TVL declaration was abolished a few months ago.
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Old 13-10-2013, 00:22
scruffpot
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They were wrong on two counts.

1. It was a monitor.
2. Then requirement to sign TVL declaration was abolished a few months ago.
Hi winston, thanks for that.. yup i thought that was the right awnser for No1, I did not know about the No2 that it had been abolished.
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Old 13-10-2013, 10:47
drumtochty
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So is there a man with a pair of ladders that operates from a van that peers through windows with a copy of the Radio Times to make sure you are only watching catch up TV on your computer?

Bet there is waiting list to get an interview for that job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

eddie
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Old 13-10-2013, 11:48
chrisjr
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Hi winston, thanks for that.. yup i thought that was the right awnser for No1, I did not know about the No2 that it had been abolished.
Next time they ask you for a declaration point them to this

The Wireless Telegraphy Act of 1967 (as amended) has been repealed meaning that from 25 June 2013 onwards, TV dealers are no longer required to notify TV Licensing when they sell or rent out TV equipment.
http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/about/l...nd-policy-AB9/
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Old 13-10-2013, 13:11
spencer1973
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I aggree that whatever the legal position.

1) If you only listen to BBC Radio asnd have no TV, you should really buy a tv licence
2) If you only watch delayed programmes and have no TV you should get a licence.

Fact is BBC programmes on TV/Radio/Online, are paid for by the licence fee (ie: Someone else if you dont have a licence), I am surprised the Law hasnt caught up yet
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Old 13-10-2013, 15:41
Winston_1
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I aggree that whatever the legal position.

1) If you only listen to BBC Radio asnd have no TV, you should really buy a tv licence
2) If you only watch delayed programmes and have no TV you should get a licence.

Fact is BBC programmes on TV/Radio/Online, are paid for by the licence fee (ie: Someone else if you dont have a licence), I am surprised the Law hasnt caught up yet
There used to be a separate radio licence. It was abolished as not worth collecting when the majority of the population had a TV.

But at the end of the day the cost of a TV licence is relatively small compared with all the taxes we have to pay, so I wonder why it upsets so many people.
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