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Old 28-10-2013, 18:42
Mr Quackers
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I will be emigrating to the USA next year and I need some advice about compatibility.
I have a large collection of DVD's - mostly region 2 PAL but some region 1 NTSC.
I also have a large number of BD's - region B or no region at all.
I have a number of multi region DVD players and some region B BD players.
I intend to take my collection of DVD's and BD's and all my players as well.
I'm concerned that whilst UK TV's display PAL and NTSC, US TV's, I believe, only display NTSC which means my DVD's region 2 PAL won't display on a US TV (although BD's will) - am I correct?
Do you think I could buy simply a display of some sort in the US rather than a TV - would a display show PAL?
I also have a Hitachi PJ TX300 projector which I want to take as well - any possible pitfalls?
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Old 28-10-2013, 19:42
BKM
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I will be emigrating to the USA next year and I need some advice about compatibility.
I have a large collection of DVD's - mostly region 2 PAL but some region 1 NTSC.

I'm concerned that whilst UK TV's display PAL and NTSC, US TV's, I believe, only display NTSC which means my DVD's region 2 PAL won't display on a US TV (although BD's will) - am I correct?
Yes and no!! Firstly NTSC and PAL are ways of encoding colour onto a composite TV signal so are meaningless if the DVD player is connected via RGB or HDMI (however US TVs do not normally have RGB - they have the similar but not the same YUV).

However friends who have emigrated to Canada have simply connected a UK DVD player to their (US/Canada) widescreen TV via simple composite and it works just fine for R2 DVDs (so it must be OK for PAL) HDMI up scaling should also work and would give even better quality.

The DVD player seems more important than the TV as multi-region seems unknown in North America.

My friends are really pleased to have got access to DVDs from the UK again - and it has seemed quite easy!!

BluRay players are, of course, always connected via HDMI so taking one which also up scales R2 (or even R1+2) DVDs seems the best solution to me!
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Old 29-10-2013, 00:34
Winston_1
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The problem is many, not all, TVs from ex NTSC countries won't operate at 50 Hz field rate. However most multi region DVD players can be set to output in NTSC on composite at 60Hz field rate. Look in the menus for "TV type, PAL, Auto, or NTSC" and select NTSC. This is something you could check on your DVD and BD players now before you go.

If your projector works now it will work over there with your existing players. It will probably work with NTSC as well, this is something you could also check now.

Also check now whether the equipment you are taking will work on a 120 volt mains supply. Step up transformers are available of course.
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Old 29-10-2013, 14:57
Mr Quackers
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Thank your for your replies.
Am I therefore correct in assuming that if my DVD players have a composite output and are hacked/chipped to multi region, they should work on US TV?
I am taking at least 4 DVD players and 3 BD players.
My 2 Denons don't have HDMI but they have composite and component- one of my Sony's only has scart so I assume that won't work.
Will they work using component output - do you know if US TV's have component input because I assume I would get better picture using component rather than composite.
My Pioneer which has been chipped and is HDMI has a strange problem when playing region 1 DVD's - in dark scenes, the picture darkens and then suddenly lightens when the scene in the film/programme changes and happens to be a brighter scene - it's not the TV because my other DVD and BD players which are multi region do not do this - any thoughts?
Model of Pioneer is DV-696AV.
Finally, will chipped/ handset hacked DVD/BD players actually output NTSC or will there be a problem re 50/60HZ situation?
Many thanks for your help
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Old 29-10-2013, 15:28
BKM
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The problem is many, not all, TVs from ex NTSC countries won't operate at 50 Hz field rate. However most multi region DVD players can be set to output in NTSC on composite at 60Hz field rate. Look in the menus for "TV type, PAL, Auto, or NTSC" and select NTSC. This is something you could check on your DVD and BD players now before you go.
I think you may no longer be correct for any reasonably modern US TV!

My friends in Canada have had NO problems with either of a oldish CRT TV or a brand new LCD one with their DVD player obtained from the UK last Christmas! Both appear to have handled 50Hz with no problems.

They do, I think, use a small stepdown transformer on the DVD player.
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Old 29-10-2013, 15:34
chrisjr
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I think you may no longer be correct for any reasonably modern US TV!

My friends in Canada have had NO problems with either of a oldish CRT TV or a brand new LCD one with their DVD player obtained from the UK last Christmas! Both have handled 50Hz with no problems.

They do, I think, use a stepdown transformer on the DVD player.
I had a random look at the specs of various US model Sony and Panasonic TVs. None of the one's I looked at seemed to support 50Hz. They listed various video standards but all were 60Hz.

Are you absolutely certain it is not your friend's DVD player converting a PAL 50Hz disk into NTSC 60Hz to feed the TV?

If they are running a 230V UK spec DVD on 120V US/Canadian mains then surely they are using a step-up transformer?
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Old 29-10-2013, 15:38
chrisjr
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Thank your for your replies.
Am I therefore correct in assuming that if my DVD players have a composite output and are hacked/chipped to multi region, they should work on US TV?
I am taking at least 4 DVD players and 3 BD players.
My 2 Denons don't have HDMI but they have composite and component- one of my Sony's only has scart so I assume that won't work.
Will they work using component output - do you know if US TV's have component input because I assume I would get better picture using component rather than composite.
My Pioneer which has been chipped and is HDMI has a strange problem when playing region 1 DVD's - in dark scenes, the picture darkens and then suddenly lightens when the scene in the film/programme changes and happens to be a brighter scene - it's not the TV because my other DVD and BD players which are multi region do not do this - any thoughts?
Model of Pioneer is DV-696AV.
Finally, will chipped/ handset hacked DVD/BD players actually output NTSC or will there be a problem re 50/60HZ situation?
Many thanks for your help
Without knowing the exact makes and models of all these players that is a question that cannot be answered.

The Pioneer you mentioned does appear to have NTSC capabilities. At least according to the manual I downloaded from the Pioneer website. It even implies it can do NTSC over HDMI.

Though it doesn't seem to explicitly mention 50-60Hz conversion.

The one thing the specs did mention however is that it seems to have a fixed 230V power supply. So won't work on US mains without an additional transformer.
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Old 29-10-2013, 17:41
captainkremmen
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The vast majority of modern flat screen TVs in the US will cope quite happily with a Pal 50Hz input, but not all. So if you intend to buy a new TV out there this is something you should check in advance, and even if they do it may only be through certain inputs (a TV may accept Pal 50 via composite but not via HDMI for example).

There's far less need or desire for multiregion DVD and BluRay players in the US too, but they are available although generally online for the big brands. Some of the budget brands are pretty much the same machines we have available here, although they may have different brand names. Often with budget makes it's just a case of entering a service menu, or inputting a few button presses, but again you'll find a wealth of info online for most.

As you are taking your own players though that is less of a problem, the main issue will be whether or not the TV you buy can accept a Pal 50Hz input and what connections are available.

The US never embraced the European Scart connector so you wont find a TV that can accept a scart cable except from some specialists, and even they they will be European models so wont work with terrestrial broadcasts in the US, although they should still work fine with set top boxes from cable companies etc via HDMI. If you buy a US TV and it has component video inputs and your player(s) has component ports that's one route, although most TVs only have one set of component inputs. If your players have HDMI that would be the preferred route and again, most (but not all) US TVs will accept Pal 50Hz via HDMI so you'd need to check in advance. Component inputs were generally widely supported in the US as they were in the UK, but just like here, more modern TVs are dropping the older connectors in favour of more HDMI inputs.

So basically:
HDMI - easiest connection and best quality, especially of course for BluRay.
Component Video - Good alternative and some TVs can even accept HD via component provided the player supports it too.
S-Video - Decent quality especially for DVD, although not HD so not the best quality for BluRay.
Composite - The lowest quality and should really be used only as a last resort.

You'll get the best quality if the TV accepts PAL 50Hz via HDMI, if it doesn't the TV may well accept Pal 60Hz but it also depends on whether your players can output Pal 60. Some players can also output pure NTSC but this seems to be less common with newer players than it used to be, so again might be worth checking the manuals and menu options to check.

You will also need transformers for your European equipment as it is doubtful any of them will be dual voltage.

Unfortunately without the actual model numbers of what you have and what you intend to connect them to it's almost impossible to give a firm yes/no answer.
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Old 29-10-2013, 18:05
BKM
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I had a random look at the specs of various US model Sony and Panasonic TVs. None of the one's I looked at seemed to support 50Hz. They listed various video standards but all were 60Hz.
I suspect this will be exactly like when people started importing R1 DVDs into the UK. All TVs then were CRT and I suspect very few then listed 60Hz in their features! In practice the "electronic frame hold" circuits seemed to manage just fine.
Are you absolutely certain it is not your friend's DVD player converting a PAL 50Hz disk into NTSC 60Hz to feed the TV?
It's a little portable DVD player with its own small (5 inch or so) screen (they were ALSO worried - doubtful even!- it would work with their main TV!). It ONLY has a composite output (AFAIR) - no SCART and no RGB I. It just seemed to work (with no problems they told me about!) with its composite output on their old CRT (which must have been 15 years old) and their new Hitachi 40" LCD.
I don't THINK it had a 60Hz or PAL/NTSC option...but cannot be sure about this!
If they are running a 230V UK spec DVD on 120V US/Canadian mains then surely they are using a step-up transformer?
As its a portable I did mean they changed its step-down transformer to a canadian one to give the 12V it needs!
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Old 29-10-2013, 19:25
Nigel Goodwin
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I suspect this will be exactly like when people started importing R1 DVDs into the UK. All TVs then were CRT and I suspect very few then listed 60Hz in their features! In practice the "electronic frame hold" circuits seemed to manage just fine.
Unfortunately it's not as simple as that, while many UK CRT sets would accept 60Hz frame signals (and many were specifically designed to so, while others worked because the chip set used supported both) it didn't work the other way round.

American TV's were deliberately designed (crippled!) NOT to accept 50Hz or PAL - and while it's supposedly not so on modern LCD sets, I've no evidence to support that.

The only American LCD's I've had dealings with were small portable ones, and they wouldn't accept 50Hz or PAL - but they were pre-HD, and pre-HDMI.
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Old 29-10-2013, 20:40
Mr Quackers
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Thank you all so much for the advice.
My units that I'm taking are;
Pioneer DV- 696 DVD chipped M/R
Denon DVD A1 DVD( box states region 2 but it plays region 1 as well)
Denon DVD2900/2 DVD chipped M/R
Yamaha S2700 DVD handset hacked
Cambridge Azur 650BD which is DVD M/R from the box
Samsung BDP1500 BD region 2 DVD playback (but can be hackable from handset, as I understand)
Sony BDP-S500ES BD (DVD M/R hacked from a 'One For All handset').
I will be leaving behind Sony DVP-SR90 DVD region 2 as this only has a scart output and I appreciate you experts for helping me out on this.
With regard to voltage, it appears there isn't any problem except for the Denons which appear to be 240V only but I can get transformers.
Do you guys think it's worthwhile taking my Sony 26inch LCD over there? Model 26EX302 - when I was out there last year they had large screen 60" Sonys and Panasonics in Wallmart for a few hundred dollars (or should I say, a fistful of dollars (sic)).
I would appreciate all your thoughts and views - do you think US versions of TV's are as good as ours or they all made in Turkey?
Nigel, do you have any info? I wonder if American Sonys and Panasonics are in essence, Bekos in disguise 'cos they're so cheap - if I want to watch my clothes washing I'll buy a Beko washing machine- otherwise I think if I want to watch TV I'll buy a Sony or Panasonic (although I understand Panasonic make some rather good automatic washing machines...)
Once again, guys, great site and fantastic help!!!!!!!!
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Old 29-10-2013, 21:33
Winston_1
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Scart only output is no problem. Just take a scart to phono lead or adapter. However I note that that DVD player is region 2 only.

From an earlier post it would appear US Sonys and Panasonic's are 60Hz only so probably best to avoid them.

I wouldn't bother taking your 26" Sony. It defiantly won't get of air broadcasts without a set top box and you'll almost certainly need a big transformer underneath it.
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Old 30-10-2013, 04:16
captainkremmen
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You could always join a US based forum and post a question asking about which TVs can accept PAL 50 and through which inputs, you'll likely get more accurate information there. Here's one:
http://www.hometheaterforum.com/foru...ectorsscreens/

As for your existing TV the size of transformer needed will depend on the power consumption of the TV, and transformers for higher power devices can be quite expensive and rather large. Look up the TV's power consumption figures and then do a search online for transformers and prices.

( And yes, I know it's late, can't sleep )
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Old 30-10-2013, 16:56
spiney2
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for dvds the main problem is european (different from usa )line and frame output rates. most modern tvs that have hdmi inputs should support all rates including for analogue scart/ rca inputs (flat screen tvs are now essentially identical worldwide except for the terrestrial tuner). but then you need a standalone dvd player that will output at the pal line and frame rates. you can take one with you and of course they are also available in usa.

theres also the question of dvd region coding. a region free player that can cope with both dvd formats should hopefully play both pal and ntsc types but im not absolutely sure.

you may have problems with playinhg both types of dvd on one computer. most software media players can cope but from memory i think region coding is actually insde the drive itself. most drives will let you change this maybe 5 times. but u can always get a 2nd usb plug in dvd drive and set it for the other dvd format ......
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Old 30-10-2013, 17:05
spiney2
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ignore this post ...... see my correction in post below ....

many consumer electronics items will now accept 120 to 240 v power input since the smps power supply modules are often designed for that. however those that are not might only last a short time or be damaged so you should check the instruction book first ..... otherwise a 2.1voltage stepdown transformer may be used as suggested above.
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Old 30-10-2013, 17:21
spiney2
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..... oops ! putting 110v ac into a device "expecting" 240 v is perfectly safe. and should also (but might not) work since the power unit is smps. this works for tvs etc but obviously would not for "white goods" which use electric motors .......

its the other way round ..... usa stuff used in europe ..... that might damage it .......

i got this wrong way round sorry.
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Old 30-10-2013, 19:04
Winston_1
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Actually it is 120V in the US not 110V.

You obviously have not read this thread. For instance my earlier post
QUOTE:The problem is many, not all, TVs from ex NTSC countries won't operate at 50 Hz field rate. However most multi region DVD players can be set to output in NTSC on composite at 60Hz field rate. Look in the menus for "TV type, PAL, Auto, or NTSC" and select NTSC. This is something you could check on your DVD and BD players now before you go. QUOTE.

Trying to run a TV at half its quoted input voltage is not recommended. Even if it works it will draw twice the current which could strain some parts of the switch mode power supply.
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Old 30-10-2013, 23:35
spiney2
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i fully understand the problem.

standalone dvd players may have various output modes. however, providing a particular player will recognise the pal format the actual line and field rates should not matter on a modern tv. of course some players may use drop frame and give a jerky picture but there are both multi standard and pal only players.

a switching supply will consume approx twice input current at half voltage but of course dissipates the same power ! the components are all rated for a higher voltage. but if the required chopper frequency is out of range then it simply wont work.
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Old 31-10-2013, 06:25
spiney2
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spose better interpret what i have written.

if a dvd player will not play a particular format then there is nothing you can do.

otherwise, it might play the "wrong" format, but badly. eg a pal dvd on ntsc device might play but either too fast with top and bottom of picture missing or instead it might use frame insertion for right speed but jerky picture.

another difficulty is pal colour on ntsc only (or vice versa). depending on player you might get hanover bars (noticable sttripes) or just monochrome.

if a player is not genuine multi region multi format then the best way might be 2 different players.

any flat screen tv should be able to cope with all combinations of line and frame rates. as long as the player produces some sort of output. for analogue inputs it will use the line and frame sync pulses

operating a tv device at double rated voltage will probably destroy it.

operating at half rated voltage is probably ok. main difficulty is higher current in input rectifiers but they should cope.

many devices are now rated 120 - 240 v ac and should be ok.
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Old 31-10-2013, 09:52
Winston_1
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any flat screen tv should be able to cope with all combinations of line and frame rates. as long as the player produces some sort of output. for analogue inputs it will use the line and frame sync pulses
You keep saying that but the fact of the matter is many TVs sold in ex NTSC markets don't cope with 50Hz field rates. If fed with 50Hz field rate signals a message comes up "incompatible video format" or something similar.
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Old 31-10-2013, 10:03
Nigel Goodwin
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I would appreciate all your thoughts and views - do you think US versions of TV's are as good as ours or they all made in Turkey?
Most American electronics are just cheap crap, similar to Vestel over here.


Nigel, do you have any info? I wonder if American Sonys and Panasonics are in essence, Bekos in disguise 'cos they're so cheap
As far as I know, Sony and Panasonic still design their own TV's, just as over here - so 'should' be better.

Don't forget, prices are lower over because of no VAT, and lower taxes generally - and prices are often shown less sales tax, where that applies.
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Old 31-10-2013, 16:48
spiney2
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flat screens in usa need to cope with 24 30 & 60 fps. p & i. missing out just 25i is a bit bizarre. certainly the better brands like sony etc should cope. some cheap onesmight not. so you just buy one that can.
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Old 31-10-2013, 22:41
Winston_1
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flat screens in usa need to cope with 24 30 & 60 fps. p & i. missing out just 25i is a bit bizarre. certainly the better brands like sony etc should cope. some cheap onesmight not. so you just buy one that can.
Wrong again. It's the Sonys and Panasonics that can't handle 25i whereas the cheap unknown brands tend to be OK. Obviously they should work but are deliberately hobbled much in the same way Panasonic hobble their sets in Europe in other ways.

http://forums.digitalspy.co.uk/showt...bled+panasonic
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Old 06-11-2013, 17:11
mike1948
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I am in the UK and have a friend in the US to whom I occasionally send DVDs recorded on my PVR from UK TV. He plays them on his PC with the aid of Nero 9 or 10 (I cannot remember which). I assume that Nero 14, the latest version, also has this capability. Some other DVD/CD burning progs may also be able to play them. I am sure you could connect a PC to a modern TV and use it as a monitor.
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Old 06-11-2013, 19:57
Nigel Goodwin
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I am sure you could connect a PC to a modern TV and use it as a monitor.
You can, almost all modern TV's have this capability (and have for a good few years).
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