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EE launch 300Mbps LTE-A Network


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Old 05-11-2013, 00:24
Colin_London
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Past midnight so guess the embargo has been lifted:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolog...G-network.html

Of course of no practical use to anyone except those involved at Tech City until compatible devices become available mid-2014.
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Old 05-11-2013, 07:57
klendathu
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If only they would spend money on a simple signal to make a call
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Old 05-11-2013, 10:15
drivel
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That's crazy.

500M allowance could be used up in half a minute.
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Old 05-11-2013, 20:09
jchamier
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Of course of no practical use to anyone except those involved at Tech City until compatible devices become available mid-2014.
Exactly - and this has to be sold as an alternative to FTTC, with similar usage rates.

e.g. 100megabytes of download for 40/month, would probably sell to people who can only get 1meg ADSL - especially if they didn't have to have a phone line. Maybe with an external antenna on the house.

I don't see any need for this sort of service on a phone or tablet to be honest.
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Old 06-11-2013, 00:19
qasdfdsaq
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You forget the millions of M2M systems and business services running on these data networks. Busses, trains, etc. anyone? Those hotspots run off 3G and 4G services. There may be anything up to 800 passengers on any one train, with several hundred using wifi at the same time.

As for an end user - the benefit comes from high bandwidth applications you're not using 24/7. While you probably don't need the latest Angry Birds update at ultrafast speed, getting it done in 5 seconds instead of 50 is still nice when you've got 40 app updates to do at the same time.

Personally my heaviest usage of 4G so far was having to download a Windows service pack at a customer's home, who had no fixed-line broadband access. That was a good few hundred megabytes that'd have taken several hours without 4G. If I need to do a big download on the move, it's usually because I need to do it and can't get my work done until it's finished. Especially important when I have my next customer to get to in an hour and I don't have two hours to sit around waiting some download.

But they do say the biggest benefitters from 4G at the moment are business users not your average consumer, and I find that hard to disagree with.
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Old 06-11-2013, 00:24
jabbamk1
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But they do say the biggest benefitters from 4G at the moment are business users not your average consumer, and I find that hard to disagree with.
I agree.

Three seem to be taking a more consumer centric approach unlike the others who seem to be targeting business users more.
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Old 06-11-2013, 00:47
Everything Goes
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You forget the millions of M2M systems and business services running on these data networks. Busses, trains, etc. anyone? Those hotspots run off 3G and 4G services. There may be anything up to 800 passengers on any one train, with several hundred using wifi at the same time.

As for an end user - the benefit comes from high bandwidth applications you're not using 24/7. While you probably don't need the latest Angry Birds update at ultrafast speed, getting it done in 5 seconds instead of 50 is still nice when you've got 40 app updates to do at the same time.

Personally my heaviest usage of 4G so far was having to download a Windows service pack at a customer's home, who had no fixed-line broadband access. That was a good few hundred megabytes that'd have taken several hours without 4G. If I need to do a big download on the move, it's usually because I need to do it and can't get my work done until it's finished. Especially important when I have my next customer to get to in an hour and I don't have two hours to sit around waiting some download.

But they do say the biggest benefitters from 4G at the moment are business users not your average consumer, and I find that hard to disagree with.
Well there goes your monthly allowance in a matter of minutes

EE's allowances are akin to giving you a Ferrari and only allowing you to use 1 litre of fuel
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Old 06-11-2013, 08:39
Quackers
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That's crazy.

500M allowance could be used up in half a minute.
Even worse, 13 Seconds if getting 100% of that 300 Megabits per second.
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Old 06-11-2013, 11:01
qasdfdsaq
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Well there goes your monthly allowance in a matter of minutes

EE's allowances are akin to giving you a Ferrari and only allowing you to use 1 litre of fuel
Not entirely. My allowance being 10GB for 46, and that was only halfway up the scale (i.e. midway between the lowest and highest available at the time)
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Old 06-11-2013, 11:09
zx50
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