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Film+TV Actor+Actress bad accents of all-time.


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Old 11-11-2013, 19:14
Anny Campbell
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Film+TV Actor+Actress bad accents of all-time.

I am new to this, and have only just recently been shown how to use google, but even I know how to use the B I U buttons!

OK I will go first, we can have a hypothetical award, if anyone can be be bothered to total them up.

It's only a bit of fun!

I have so many ''Cockney Manchester" ones from Frasier, but I will choose one of my favourite actors Mel Gibson, who, apparently was born in Peekskill, New York, United States.

I thought he was from Australia, until I googled that he moved there aged 12, so at least he switched one accent. Unfortunately not 2 with Scottish!

My choice is

Mel Gibson in Braveheart
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Old 11-11-2013, 19:20
Inky Binky
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Philip Glenister from the awful ITV show "DEMONS".

He plays an American demon hunter on it but he struggled so badly with the accent. As a matter of fact, he slips in and out of an American accent so often that it became a game for many of us watching. He was so terrible on that show. lol.
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Old 11-11-2013, 19:23
sheila blige
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I love Alan Rickman but someone ought to tell him that he cannot do a convincing East Coast US accent. He's particularly awful in a film called Dark Harbour.
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Old 11-11-2013, 19:40
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'It is the fiend himself!'


Ah, Keanu...
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Old 11-11-2013, 20:12
Blossom85
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Julia Roberts' attempt at an Irish accent in 'Michael Collins' was HORRENDOUS!!!
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Old 11-11-2013, 20:15
Gulftastic
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The legendary 'Irish' accent from 'Sons Of Anarchy':

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVIkgK6eyn0
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Old 11-11-2013, 20:20
jeffiner1892
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Jamie Dornan's accent in Once Upon a Time kept flitting between American and Belfast.

When he appeared in a flashback in the second season he'd given up on American all together.
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Old 11-11-2013, 20:41
wakey
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Film+TV Actor+Actress bad accents of all-time.

I am new to this, and have only just recently been shown how to use google, but even I know how to use the B I U buttons!

OK I will go first, we can have a hypothetical award, if anyone can be be bothered to total them up.

It's only a bit of fun!

I have so many ''Cockney Manchester" ones from Frasier, but I will choose one of my favourite actors Mel Gibson, who, apparently was born in Peekskill, New York, United States.

I thought he was from Australia, until I googled that he moved there aged 12, so at least he switched one accent. Unfortunately not 2 with Scottish!

My choice is

Mel Gibson in Braveheart
I don't think its fair to really criticise his accent here. It was almost certainly as genuine as anyone elses accent in the movie. After all its a movie about someone who lived between 1272 and 1305 so no-one knows what the correct accent at the time would have been. It certainly wouldn't however have been the accent of modern day scots.

When it comes to historically set works imho we simply have to discount any movie set before the late 1800's as we simply have no frame of reference.

Talking of Scottish though I want to throw Sean Connery into the mix in anything where he isn't playing a Scot. Hunt For Red October especially sticks in my mind
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Old 11-11-2013, 20:48
woot_whoo
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Does it count when the actors don't even try? Both Clark Gable and Leslie Howard played antebellum Southern gentlemen in Gone With the Wind; yet Gable simply spoke in his native Yankee accent and Howard bizarrely spoke in upper class English!

One of the worst attempts at an accent I've ever heard was on TV rather than film. The guy playing Daphne's ex-fiance Clive on Frasier sported a strange, mockney accent that made Dick Van Dyke look like a native Eastender. I believe he even got out the word "lover-ly" at one point. When Daphne's brothers later showed up, their allegedly Manchester accents ranged from Robbie Coltrane speaking in tongues to Anthony LaPaglia attempting cockney.
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Old 11-11-2013, 21:02
degsyhufc
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I don't think its fair to really criticise his accent here. It was almost certainly as genuine as anyone elses accent in the movie. After all its a movie about someone who lived between 1272 and 1305 so no-one knows what the correct accent at the time would have been. It certainly wouldn't however have been the accent of modern day scots.

When it comes to historically set works imho we simply have to discount any movie set before the late 1800's as we simply have no frame of reference.

Talking of Scottish though I want to throw Sean Connery into the mix in anything where he isn't playing a Scot. Hunt For Red October especially sticks in my mind
I am Juan Sánchez Villalobos Ramírez, Chief metallurgist to King Charles V of Spain. And I'm at your service.


Apparently Russell Crowe got a bit of a pasting for his varying accent in Robin Hood.
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Old 11-11-2013, 21:02
degsyhufc
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Does it count when the actors don't even try? Both Clark Gable and Leslie Howard played antebellum Southern gentlemen in Gone With the Wind; yet Gable simply spoke in his native Yankee accent and Howard bizarrely spoke in upper class English!
Daniel Craig went that route in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
Many Swedish critics questioned the choice to have many of the characters talk in "Swedish-accent". Most criticism was pointed to Mara's accent that many critics heard as Russian or Dutch and not Swedish at all. Daniel Craig admitted in an interview that he thought this was stupid and therefore used his real voice.
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Old 11-11-2013, 21:04
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Which reminds me, Kevin Costner or the director came to the same conclusion in Robin Hood Price of Thieves.
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Old 11-11-2013, 21:19
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Christopher Lambert's 'Scottish' accent and Sean Connery's 'Spanish' accent in Highlander
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Old 11-11-2013, 21:22
woot_whoo
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Which reminds me, Kevin Costner or the director came to the same conclusion in Robin Hood Price of Thieves.
This was also the case in the film version of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas. The filmmakers decided that they might as well have the German characters simply speak in the actors' natural, English accents, as having them speak English in affected German accents would be equally innaccurate (wartime Nazis not being known for speaking English full time). It worked because everyone spoke in English accents, so no one stood out as not playing ball or being convincing. It also brought the horror a little closer to home.
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Old 11-11-2013, 21:25
sarahcs
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I always assumed the Moon accents in Frasier were deliberately terrible. It's not like Robbie Coltrane can't do a proper English accent.
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Old 11-11-2013, 21:53
Anny Campbell
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Fantastic replies

I did say it was a bit of fun, but please continue

Especially Americans who can tell us Brits about bad American state accents BY Americans

For instance

Does Kelsey Grammar do a good Seattle accent in Frasier (or the actors playing Niles and Martin Crane)?

In Britain Cockney, Manc, Geordie, Scouse and Glaswegian are clearly different, and sometimes impossible to decipher if you are not from that area.

Is the same true in other countries?
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Old 11-11-2013, 21:56
degsyhufc
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I'm not sure how they sound to US ears but I find Aussie actresses tend to do good accents, specifically generic American.
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Old 11-11-2013, 22:15
Whedonite
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One of the worst attempts at an accent I've ever heard was on TV rather than film. The guy playing Daphne's ex-fiance Clive on Frasier sported a strange, mockney accent that made Dick Van Dyke look like a native Eastender. I believe he even got out the word "lover-ly" at one point. When Daphne's brothers later showed up, their allegedly Manchester accents ranged from Robbie Coltrane speaking in tongues to Anthony LaPaglia attempting cockney.
The actors apparently deliberately messed up the accents to make fun of the way our accents are portrayed on American TV. At least the Moon family did. I can't say the same for Clive or Daphne's friends in the episode where they stay in a cabin.
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Old 11-11-2013, 22:17
Inky Binky
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In the TV show FRINGE (love that show), I noticed that actress Anna Torv unknowingly sometimes slipped into her native Australian accent. It caught me off guard when I first heard it. It didn't happen a whole lot but it is sprinkled throughout the series. Most people wouldn't notice it because it was usually just a word or two - not an entire dialog.
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Old 11-11-2013, 22:20
jeffiner1892
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This was also the case in the film version of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas. The filmmakers decided that they might as well have the German characters simply speak in the actors' natural, English accents, as having them speak English in affected German accents would be equally innaccurate (wartime Nazis not being known for speaking English full time). It worked because everyone spoke in English accents, so no one stood out as not playing ball or being convincing. It also brought the horror a little closer to home.
Yeah I wondered about that because Rupert Friend spoke with an English accent in it but had a reasonably convincing German accent in Young Victoria.

In "Wimbledon" Nikolaj Coster-Waldau was a Dane playing a German but it was hard to figure if he was speaking with a German accent or not.

That reminds me, Peter Dinklage's English accent in Prince Caspian (and even in Season one of Game of Thrones) was AWFUL.
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Old 11-11-2013, 22:21
woot_whoo
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Fantastic replies

I did say it was a bit of fun, but please continue

Especially Americans who can tell us Brits about bad American state accents BY Americans

For instance

Does Kelsey Grammar do a good Seattle accent in Frasier (or the actors playing Niles and Martin Crane)?

In Britain Cockney, Manc, Geordie, Scouse and Glaswegian are clearly different, and sometimes impossible to decipher if you are not from that area.

Is the same true in other countries?
In Cheers, the only actor to attempt a Bostonian accent was John Ratzenberger as Cliff. Strangely, Rhea Perlman (who plays Carla) was meant to be a Bostonian, but she and her family all spoke in Brooklyn accents.

I think Rue McClanahan deliberately hammed up her Georgia accent as Blanche in The Golden Girls. In the pilot, Blanche wasn't Southern and Rue just spoke in her regular accent - it was only when the show got picked up for a series that Blanche became a self-proclaimed Southern belle.

Also in the Golden Girls, Sophia spoke in what we might consider a Yiddish accent (complete with words like "yutz"). This was despite her character being supposedly Sicilian! Even more bizarrely, Sophia's sister Angela visited from Sicily a few times (played by Nancy Walker) and also spoke in Walker's Yiddish accent. When brother Angelo appeared, the actor (Bill Dana) attempted one of the most OTT eye-a-taaalian accents ever committed to TV.
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Old 11-11-2013, 22:26
woot_whoo
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The actors apparently deliberately messed up the accents to make fun of the way our accents are portrayed on American TV. At least the Moon family did. I can't say the same for Clive or Daphne's friends in the episode where they stay in a cabin.
That's good to know - I kind of thought that Coltrane was directed to just have a laugh with it. I wonder if they actually scripted his gibberish or told him just to mumble nonsense.

The guy who played Clive, though - nah, he was just awful. Jane Leeves must have been laughing behind her hands at the actor's attempt to 'do English'.

On British TV, Ray Winstone's cockney Henry VIII was laughably poor - especially when the rest of the cast was RPing it up.
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Old 11-11-2013, 22:28
jeffiner1892
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Sometimes the accents do seem ramped up soundwise though.

I remember watching one of the Emily episodes of Friends and a housemate wondering why they couldn't get a real English actress instead of an American putting on a bad accent.
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Old 11-11-2013, 22:29
Inky Binky
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That reminds me, Peter Dinklage's English accent in Prince Caspian (and even in Season one of Game of Thrones) was AWFUL.
But that's forgivable because his character is not English (it's a fantasy show) and they're not in England. So any accent (phony or not) is fine for GAME OF THRONES.
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Old 11-11-2013, 22:34
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That's good to know - I kind of thought that Coltrane was directed to just have a laugh with it. I wonder if they actually scripted his gibberish or told him just to mumble nonsense.

The guy who played Clive, though - nah, he was just awful. Jane Leeves must have been laughing behind her hands at the actor's attempt to 'do English'.

On British TV, Ray Winstone's cockney Henry VIII was laughably poor - especially when the rest of the cast was RPing it up.
I'd love to see a Cockney Henry VIII. I've never seen Winstone's version. It sounds hilarious


But that's forgivable because his character is not English (it's a fantasy show) and they're not in England. So any accent (phony or not) is fine for GAME OF THRONES.
The actors playing his siblings have English accents though and he's suppose to sound like them. He sounds really out of place, but it's fine because Dinklage is awesome.
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