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Old 19-08-2014, 13:12
blueisthecolour
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So every decade has seen a wide range of differing music style and major artists. Many of these are lost from the public conscious for ever, some are forgotten for a while before regaining popularity and the lucky few remain part of music and cultural history. They form the soundtrack for any kind of nostalgia for that era, whether it be period movies, documentaries or theme bars

I was wondering what popular music will end up as defining the 00s in this way. What will be played over clip shows of the Iraq war, the economic crash and Obama become President? What band references will tell people that the movie is set in the decade? What will be the standard dj set for 'noughties nights'?
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Old 19-08-2014, 13:58
AdzPower
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Coldplay, The Killers, Adele.
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Old 19-08-2014, 14:26
Soupietwist
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Seven Nation Army - seems to be the very much go to song, popular in both football grounds and TV clipping.
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Old 19-08-2014, 15:05
len112
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I expect that would be music from the 80's then .
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Old 19-08-2014, 15:18
Hav_mor91
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Do you mean 2000-2009- Which for me was Indie, R&B, Pop punk, and the continuing teen pop revival 99-02 and then tail ending off into Electronica/Dance.

DJ set would include:

Can't Get You Out Of My Head
Get The Party Started
Girlfriend (Avril)
Mr. Brightside
Take Me Out
Seven Nation Army
Mercy (Duffy)
Umbrella
Ooops..I Did It Again
Hung Up
Sexy Back
Just Dance
In For The Kill
Smile
Chasing Pavements
Leave Right Now
White Flag
The Real Slim Shady
I Predict A Riot
Everybody's Changing
Bleeding Love
We Belong Together


Really the noughties had more defining trends and artist as opposed to one definitive sound it was a rather good decade for music on reflection something for all.
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Old 19-08-2014, 15:42
radcliffe95
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Nothing, it was the worst decade for music since the charts began.....until the current teenies of course.
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Old 19-08-2014, 18:01
mgvsmith
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Do you mean 2000-2009- Which for me was Indie, R&B, Pop punk, and the continuing teen pop revival 99-02 and then tail ending off into Electronica/Dance.

DJ set would include:

Can't Get You Out Of My Head
Get The Party Started
Girlfriend (Avril)
Mr. Brightside
Take Me Out
Seven Nation Army
Mercy (Duffy)
Umbrella
Ooops..I Did It Again
Hung Up
Sexy Back
Just Dance
In For The Kill
Smile
Chasing Pavements
Leave Right Now
White Flag
The Real Slim Shady
I Predict A Riot
Everybody's Changing
Bleeding Love
We Belong Together


Really the noughties had more defining trends and artist as opposed to one definitive sound it was a rather good decade for music on reflection something for all.
I think it is probably the first decade which didn't have a major new genre or youth-inspired movement in music. The music journos tried to suggest names for all sorts of genres and some of them have stuck but they didn't represent any real youth movement. It's the decade that the music biz really took over, even with all the fears about how the industry would be swept aside by downloading and streaming, it didn't happen.

I think it is the decade of the ipod and the playlist and it is appropriate you answer by way of a playlist. We have the tools to find a huge range of different music from many more sources and we can curate our own music lists. Again despite the fears that suggestion that the 'long tail' model of consumption would mean charts dominated by established artists, new music came through.

I think some of the retro music like Amy Winehouse and Adele will stand up over time. Rock music will seem a little lighter in tone, with Kings of Leon, Coldplay and the Arctic Monkeys to the fore. The music that is considered cutting edge music will probably be from artists like Jay-Z, Kanye West and The White Stripes.
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Old 19-08-2014, 18:10
Pink Knight
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Nothing, it was the worst decade for music since the charts began.....until the current teenies of course.
Can't disagree with this. There is probably still decent music coming out, but it seems to get nowhere near the charts more than ever.
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Old 19-08-2014, 18:18
Makson
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Back To Black/Rehab
Pokerface/Bad Romance
Bleeding Love
Umbrella
Crazy In Love
Toxic
You're Beautiful
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Old 19-08-2014, 18:28
BRITLAND
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Top 10 Decade Defining Songs of the 2000s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waClhq-Oo2g

Top 10 Decade Defining Musical Acts: 2000s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADT5pFBb5bo
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Old 19-08-2014, 18:29
Declan_Khan
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Eurodance, the indie revival, dubstep, nu metal, club rap, white R&B. Linkin Park, 50 Cent, The Strokes, The White Stripes, Black Eyed Peas, Justin Timberlake, Amy Winehouse, Lily Allen, The Arctic Monkeys, Slipknot, David Guetta. "In The Club", "Seven Nation Army", "Sexyback", "I Bet You Look Good On The Dance Floor", "Last Nite", "Crawling", "Duality", "When Love Takes Over", "Back To Black", "Smile".
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Old 19-08-2014, 18:29
Dandem
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I think it will be remember as the decade where indie and pop-rock became more popular. I think people are always likely to recall songs like:

- The Killers - Mr Brightside
- Arctic Monkeys - I Bet That You Look Good On The Dancefloor
- Evanescence - Bring Me To Life
- My Chemical Romance - Welcome to the Black Parade
- Green Day - American Idiot
- The Kooks - She Moves In Her Own Way
- White Stripes - Seven Nation Army
- Kings of Leon - Sex on Fire
- Coldplay - Yellow
- Kaiser Chiefs - I Predict A Riot
- The Fratellis - Chelsea Dagger
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Old 19-08-2014, 18:33
Hitstastic
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The decade as a whole will be remembered for Reality TV pop, with Will Young scoring the biggest selling single of the decade with his Pop Idol winner's single. To think that was in 2002, and no song between 2003 and 2009 could outsell the song.

Then again, the death of the cd single and the rise of the legal download meant atrocious sales between 2003-2007, and only then did sales start to pick up again.

On the flip side, Coldplay are definite contenders for band of the decade. Songs like Fix You and The Scientist are timeless, these are the type of songs that are likely to feature on TV montages in the future. They've already had a massive impact on several TV shows.
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Old 19-08-2014, 18:33
mgvsmith
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Can't disagree with this. There is probably still decent music coming out, but it seems to get nowhere near the charts more than ever.
Yes, some music finds it level in retrospect not at the time. The most popular music of the decade will probably help define it but there will always be some left-field music that has been partially overlooked that will emerge later as being more important than first thought. I think that might be Sigur Ros for example.
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Old 19-08-2014, 19:18
Eric_Blob
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The decade as a whole will be remembered for Reality TV pop
I highly doubt that personally. Shows like Pop Idol or X Factor will be remembered when you talk about TV in the 00's, but not when you talk about music in the 00's imo.
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Old 19-08-2014, 19:49
cnbcwatcher
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In terms of mainstream pop acts:

Britney Spears
Lady Gaga (Fame era)
Justin Timberlake
The Pussycat Dolls
Girls Aloud (UK and Ireland only)
Beyonce
Sugababes (again possibly UK only)
P!nk

As for songs:
Can't Get You Out Of My Head
Just Dance
Poker Face
I Kissed A Girl
Bad Romance
Hung Up
Umbrella
SexyBack
Get The Party Started
Oops I Did It Again
I'm A Slave 4 U
Gimme More
Womanizer
Toxic
About You Now
Up (The Saturdays)
Crazy In Love
Single Ladies

I can't think of many others
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Old 19-08-2014, 22:45
Hav_mor91
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I think it is probably the first decade which didn't have a major new genre or youth-inspired movement in music. The music journos tried to suggest names for all sorts of genres and some of them have stuck but they didn't represent any real youth movement. It's the decade that the music biz really took over, even with all the fears about how the industry would be swept aside by downloading and streaming, it didn't happen.

I think it is the decade of the ipod and the playlist and it is appropriate you answer by way of a playlist. We have the tools to find a huge range of different music from many more sources and we can curate our own music lists. Again despite the fears that suggestion that the 'long tail' model of consumption would mean charts dominated by established artists, new music came through.

I think some of the retro music like Amy Winehouse and Adele will stand up over time. Rock music will seem a little lighter in tone, with Kings of Leon, Coldplay and the Arctic Monkeys to the fore. The music that is considered cutting edge music will probably be from artists like Jay-Z, Kanye West and The White Stripes.
Exactly it was the first real decade where music was available on demand in many differing forums it was when a song could be heard on an advert and become an istant hit.

There were small trends and sub-genres within like The Klaxons and the Nu-rave movement or Emo with bands like My chemical Romance but overall these lasted little time and were quickly gazumped by the next trend or fad.

And despite the disparaging remarks on here against the decade amongst all the crap like in most decades there was some great stuff.

Lets not pretend like the majority of every decade has many stinkers.
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Old 19-08-2014, 23:04
Billy Hicks
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Like most decades, the noughties saw a complete jettisoning of anything relating to the previous decade that was now considered "uncool" until its return as a revival a further decade later. So "cheesy" manufactured kid-friendly pop of the late 1990s was out, more risque acoustic-driven R&B-influenced pop was in, lots of former squeaky-clean stars suddenly given a radical makeover wearing much less clothing and singing more explicit (yet still, just, radio-friendly) songs to show how grown up they were now. This soundtracked 2001 to about 2005, after which you had a bit of an attempt at a retro soul revival with Amy Winehouse (+ Mark Ronson), Duffy and other distinctively-sounding female singers including some bird called Adele, and then the slow, gradual re-introduction of synthpop through the second half, to the point where by the time you get to 2009 you've got the sounds of the 2010s arriving a bit early. So whereas songs like 'Crazy In Love', 'Hips Don't Lie', 'Umbrella' etc I'd definitely include as noughties anthems, there's a few by 2009 - 'Poker Face', 'Sexy Chick', 'I Gotta Feeling' etc I'd have to think about playing at a future Noughties Nostalgia Night as it feels like the start of the next instead. Play, say, S Club 7's 'Reach' next to Lady Gaga's 'Bad Romance' and I think many would struggle to think of them both being products of the same decade, one a 90s hangover and the other a 10s preview. Similarly in a 1990s night, playing Lonnie Gordon's 'Happenin' All Over Again' only to immediately segue into the Artful Dodger's 'Rewind' would be an extremely bizarre moment!

In dance music, we began with the late 90s Ibiza trance boom still a major dominant force right through the early noughties, joined with the 2-step garage that ruled the first couple of years but was mostly gone by late 2001, its big vocal star Craig David soon becoming little more than a punchline. By 2002 the likes of Flip & Fill have watered the trance sound down into much less powerful vocal pop music, which briefly does well but trance as a mainstream chart sound is essentially over by the end of 2004. In its place are a variety of "new sounds", none of which entirely sticking - the closest perhaps being the dull looped house of 2004-2006, following which you've got the electro of 2006-07, the bassline garage of 2007-08 and the brief but weirdly glorious Eurodance revival of 2008 but none were around for long. Dubstep was developing underground by the end of the decade but didn't really hit the top reaches of the charts until 2011, and even that's now been superseded by the current deep house fad. In general dance plays a much smaller role in the noughties charts than both the 90s and even the 10s so far, tastes perhaps tiring of it and wanting some guitarwork back in the top 40 instead.

Which I think leads onto what the noughties will most be remembered for - the indie. While it didn't entirely last the whole of the decade - we started with a continuation of downbeat post-Britpop and then went mad for Nu-Metal for about a year in 2001, but by the mid-2000s Indie was the absolute dominating sound and responsible for almost all the decade's best tracks. In the end it suffered from a landfill effect, suffering from diminishing returns and filling the charts with so many interchangeable guitar bands to the point where it fell off a cliff after about 2008 and only recently seems to be climbing back up again. There's also the huge embracing of American urban and R&B music, but it's not a sound I've ever been particularly familiar with - it did jostle a lot in the charts with indie around the middle of the decade though and was responsible for a fair few number 1s, probably more #1s than indie managed to be honest particularly on the singles chart.

It seems odd to talk about reality TV acts because that's still very much around today, The X Factor still churning them out although perhaps a bit less than its late-noughties peak. I'd name these as some of the most memorable and defining tracks of the decade:

Coldplay - Yellow
Kylie Minogue - Can't Get You Out of My Head
White Stripes - Seven Nation Army
Beyonce - Crazy In Love
The Killers - Mr Brightside
James Blunt - You're Beautiful
Kanye West - Gold Digger
Snow Patrol - Chasing Cars
Kings of Leon - Sex on Fire

...and then you've got the complete revolution of singles themselves, going from compact discs bought in a music store in 2000 to downloaded or even streamed from the internet in 2009!

Have definitely missed a lot out but that's at least my summary of some of it.
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Old 19-08-2014, 23:17
dsmithy2011
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In a nutshell Britney Spears
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Old 19-08-2014, 23:23
James_Taylor2
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In a nutshell Britney Spears
Yer everything from the noughties was about her
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Old 19-08-2014, 23:37
cnbcwatcher
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In a nutshell Britney Spears
Definitely GO BRITNEY!
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Old 20-08-2014, 00:10
dsmithy2011
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Whenever i think of the noughties all i picture is her musically and publicly ups and downs she definitely defined the noughties for me.
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Old 20-08-2014, 00:15
cnbcwatcher
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Whenever i think of the noughties all i picture is her musically and publicly ups and downs she definitely defined the noughties for me.
Well she released 5 albums during the noughties (Oops, Britney, In The Zone, Blackout and Circus) as well as her first GH and remix album so she was definitely very active. She also did that movie (Crossroads) and then 2007 happened. I became a big fan during the early noughties.
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Old 20-08-2014, 00:53
mgvsmith
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Yes, I think the 00s should be defined by a female artist but for overall talent and some lasting influence it should probably be Amy rather than Britney.
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Old 20-08-2014, 05:15
StratusSphere
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Like most decades, the noughties saw a complete jettisoning of anything relating to the previous decade that was now considered "uncool" until its return as a revival a further decade later. So "cheesy" manufactured kid-friendly pop of the late 1990s was out, more risque acoustic-driven R&B-influenced pop was in, lots of former squeaky-clean stars suddenly given a radical makeover wearing much less clothing and singing more explicit (yet still, just, radio-friendly) songs to show how grown up they were now. This soundtracked 2001 to about 2005, after which you had a bit of an attempt at a retro soul revival with Amy Winehouse (+ Mark Ronson), Duffy and other distinctively-sounding female singers including some bird called Adele, and then the slow, gradual re-introduction of synthpop through the second half, to the point where by the time you get to 2009 you've got the sounds of the 2010s arriving a bit early. So whereas songs like 'Crazy In Love', 'Hips Don't Lie', 'Umbrella' etc I'd definitely include as noughties anthems, there's a few by 2009 - 'Poker Face', 'Sexy Chick', 'I Gotta Feeling' etc I'd have to think about playing at a future Noughties Nostalgia Night as it feels like the start of the next instead. Play, say, S Club 7's 'Reach' next to Lady Gaga's 'Bad Romance' and I think many would struggle to think of them both being products of the same decade, one a 90s hangover and the other a 10s preview. Similarly in a 1990s night, playing Lonnie Gordon's 'Happenin' All Over Again' only to immediately segue into the Artful Dodger's 'Rewind' would be an extremely bizarre moment!

In dance music, we began with the late 90s Ibiza trance boom still a major dominant force right through the early noughties, joined with the 2-step garage that ruled the first couple of years but was mostly gone by late 2001, its big vocal star Craig David soon becoming little more than a punchline. By 2002 the likes of Flip & Fill have watered the trance sound down into much less powerful vocal pop music, which briefly does well but trance as a mainstream chart sound is essentially over by the end of 2004. In its place are a variety of "new sounds", none of which entirely sticking - the closest perhaps being the dull looped house of 2004-2006, following which you've got the electro of 2006-07, the bassline garage of 2007-08 and the brief but weirdly glorious Eurodance revival of 2008 but none were around for long. Dubstep was developing underground by the end of the decade but didn't really hit the top reaches of the charts until 2011, and even that's now been superseded by the current deep house fad. In general dance plays a much smaller role in the noughties charts than both the 90s and even the 10s so far, tastes perhaps tiring of it and wanting some guitarwork back in the top 40 instead.

Which I think leads onto what the noughties will most be remembered for - the indie. While it didn't entirely last the whole of the decade - we started with a continuation of downbeat post-Britpop and then went mad for Nu-Metal for about a year in 2001, but by the mid-2000s Indie was the absolute dominating sound and responsible for almost all the decade's best tracks. In the end it suffered from a landfill effect, suffering from diminishing returns and filling the charts with so many interchangeable guitar bands to the point where it fell off a cliff after about 2008 and only recently seems to be climbing back up again. There's also the huge embracing of American urban and R&B music, but it's not a sound I've ever been particularly familiar with - it did jostle a lot in the charts with indie around the middle of the decade though and was responsible for a fair few number 1s, probably more #1s than indie managed to be honest particularly on the singles chart.

It seems odd to talk about reality TV acts because that's still very much around today, The X Factor still churning them out although perhaps a bit less than its late-noughties peak. I'd name these as some of the most memorable and defining tracks of the decade:

Coldplay - Yellow
Kylie Minogue - Can't Get You Out of My Head
White Stripes - Seven Nation Army
Beyonce - Crazy In Love
The Killers - Mr Brightside
James Blunt - You're Beautiful
Kanye West - Gold Digger
Snow Patrol - Chasing Cars
Kings of Leon - Sex on Fire

...and then you've got the complete revolution of singles themselves, going from compact discs bought in a music store in 2000 to downloaded or even streamed from the internet in 2009!

Have definitely missed a lot out but that's at least my summary of some of it.
What an excellent summary!
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