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Strictly: "Celebrity and showmanship"


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Old 07-02-2014, 19:13
wazzyboy
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According to a leading amateur ballroom dancer, SCD is more about the above than dancing. Do you agree?

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Old 08-02-2014, 08:18
white tigress
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Yep! Suspect this pair would leap at the chance to work on SCD, but perhaps they lack the 'showmanship' factor?? It IS a Sat night Entertainment show, not a technical tick-box competition after all.
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Old 08-02-2014, 09:58
Ballroom-B.
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Of course the show is more about the celebrity and the showmanship as there is just insufficient time to learn all the intracacies of the technique of each dance. They have time to learn some but not all. There is plenty of show as well as technique in proper ballroom competitions.

I don't think, however, you can assume that they would love to be involved in SCD and don't have the showmanship. If anything the article suggests the opposite - they are very much more concerned about competing and being the best that they can be before turning pro. Anyway SCD clashes with three of the competitions they mentioned in the article (British nationals at Blackpool, internationals at Royal Albert Hall and WDC at Disney).
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Old 08-02-2014, 12:56
peeve
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Have to agree - of course Strictly is an entertainment show before it is a dancing programme. Come Dancing it ain't, thank goodness, or we wouldn't be watching in our millions and it wouldn't be broadcast at prime time on a Saturday evening.

As the article makes clear, the amateur dancers are not sneering at Strictly - indeed, they are delighted that it has raised the profile of dance - but it is not surprising that it doesn't appeal to them in the same way it appeals to those of us who are strictly sofa dancers. My elderly neighbour, who gave up ballroom dancing in her 80s, won't watch Strictly because they don't wear long gloves. Sniff.
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Old 08-02-2014, 13:06
dancingbearbear
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Don't wear long gloves? Some of them are barely wearing underwear!
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Old 08-02-2014, 13:25
peeve
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Don't wear long gloves? Some of them are barely wearing underwear!
I know! This is more Dot's style...

How would you get that dress in the boot of your car?
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Old 08-02-2014, 21:10
wazzyboy
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Part of me thought it alluded to the pros as opposed to the celeb contestants, in terms of celebrity and showmanship?
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Old 08-02-2014, 22:22
peeve
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Part of me thought it alluded to the pros as opposed to the celeb contestants, in terms of celebrity and showmanship?
You could be right. The pro dancers are not selected primarily because of the number of ballroom dancing medals they have on their mantelpiece. They need to be able to tackle all 10 dances, plus the extra ones that the Strictly producers throw at them (Salsa, Charleston, Argentine Tango, American Smooth); choreograph routines; teach celebrities how to do that routine; and have a decent personality and enough charm to win their own fanbase.

For example, Kevin from Grimsby is not nearly as good a dancer as his sister, Joanne, but he was a huge success on his first series because he was able to hit all those Strictly buttons. To be brutal, he didn't need to be that good a dancer. I'm fine with that, and I would guess most of the GBP would be happy with that as well, if they give it any thought at all.
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Old 08-02-2014, 23:19
Steve9214
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I recall Stephen Fry talking about the film "Magic" starring Anthony Hopkins, where a magician performs the most difficult card trick there is, to little applause.
A rival magician performs the most basic tricks to thunderous acclaim, because he does it with "showmanship".

There is a technique of a magician or assistant doing a move that is guaranteed to make an audience applaud, such a move is called a "clap-trap".

Strictly may be full of "showmanship" but X-Factor is full of "clap-traps"
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Old 10-02-2014, 00:16
Ellie_
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I don't think she's knocking it tbh, she seems to be saying it's given people a way to relate to ballroom dancing that wasn't there before. I know strictly is completely what made me take up ballroom dancing and I've absolutely LOVED it from the first lesson.

You do get to see some really top dancing from the pros as well, so while the show is focused on the celebrities you still get to see the proper stuff!
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:47
dancingbearbear
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I recall Stephen Fry talking about the film "Magic" starring Anthony Hopkins....
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!! I'll not sleep tonight, now that you've reminded me of the most terrifying thing I've ever seen in my life!
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Old 11-02-2014, 12:24
white tigress
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You could be right. The pro dancers are not selected primarily because of the number of ballroom dancing medals they have on their mantelpiece. They need to be able to tackle all 10 dances, plus the extra ones that the Strictly producers throw at them (Salsa, Charleston, Argentine Tango, American Smooth); choreograph routines; teach celebrities how to do that routine; and have a decent personality and enough charm to win their own fanbase.

For example, Kevin from Grimsby is not nearly as good a dancer as his sister, Joanne, but he was a huge success on his first series because he was able to hit all those Strictly buttons. To be brutal, he didn't need to be that good a dancer. I'm fine with that, and I would guess most of the GBP would be happy with that as well, if they give it any thought at all.
One comment on KFG's 'appeal'--he really totally RESPONDS to a Live Atmosphere and raises his game significantly, which--as an old Theatre Pro--I know makes ALL the Difference: it's what Laurence Olivier had which, perhaps technically superior but spiritually unconnected performers lacked. Call it The X-Factor or Charisma, but it's not only giving a quality performance BUT the performer's innate WILL TO CONNECT and PLEASE the live Audience, which is the whole POINT OF genius performance skills: it's a 2-way love affair between skilled artist and beloved audience. Happily for Our Kev THIS quality comes across on TV powerfully, hence his public acclaim.
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Old 11-02-2014, 22:04
HeidiB
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You are wrong.
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Old 11-02-2014, 23:12
Ellie_
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Well, that put that to bed then.
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Old 11-02-2014, 23:47
dancingbearbear
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Well, that put that to bed then.
I think we can all consider ourselves 'told'
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Old 12-02-2014, 13:48
white tigress
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Er, OK. x
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