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Best supporting actress nominee and Bette Davis co-star Joan Lorring dies aged 88


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Old 09-06-2014, 13:33
Hildaonpluto
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Also meant to say I view Barbara Stanwyck,Joan Crawford and Bette Davis as worthy of equal stature in terms of being Hollywood greats.For me their the great trio not duo.
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Old 09-06-2014, 13:34
Michael_Eve
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How would you rate Clift in the pantheon, Walter? He's my favourite actor. Happened to catch The Young Lions on telly years ago, and I'm not into War Films generally, but I found him mesmerising. Didn't know then obviously that it was his first post crash film.

Sought out his other films, and there's just something about his presence. Even in films I don't really rate that highly he's startling. My favourite performances are probably the aforementioned, Wild River, From Here to Eternity, The Search and an astonishing cameo in Judgement at Nurenberg. Read the Bosworth biography, which is brilliant but can be a hard read as his demons overtook him.
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Old 09-06-2014, 14:30
Walter Neff
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WOW Thats a heck of a lot of photos!Im so pleased you actually got to meet your favourite hollywood icon.How many people can say that?!
I will certainly like to join your group so that I can look at your pbotos.I shall do so in the next few days.Thank You.Have you met any other film stars?Have you been to visit Hollywood?

I Know Bette and Joan feuded.Did Ms Stanwyck feud with anyone?I think a rare biography
on Barbara was published in 2013.Have you read it?
I look forward to you joining us, you will be very welcome, as will any other genuine movie buff.

I have met several stars over the past 60 years. There used to be a regular annual event in the late 1940's, The Sunday Pictorial Film Garden Party, which was held at Morden Hall Park. I first went in 1948 and that was where I saw my favourites at the time like Margaret Lockwood and Jean Kent in the flesh. The first Hollywood star that I saw was Burt Lancaster at the height of his stardom in 1951.

I met Deborah Kerr in 1972 when she invited some fans into her dressing room when she was starring in Candida in Shaftesbury Avenue. We had our photo taken together and there is a copy of it in the files section of my Stanwyck group. She was without doubt the friendliest, and the loveliest star that I have ever seen.

I did see Marilyn when she gave a press reception at the Savoy Hotel in 1956 when she came here to film The Prince and the Showgirl with Laurence Olivier. Sadly, I didn't have a camera in those days, I could have got some great shots as she leaned out of the window waving, and she was gorgeous from where I was standing.

Barbara was loved by the Crew, the electricians, and all the backroom guys on her films. She was just about the only star that I ever heard of getting presented with a gift from the Crew at the end of filming. In The Great Man's Lady she played a character who aged from 16 to 112. At the end of filming she was presented with a carving of herself as the old lady, and it was inscribed, "To the Crews Great Lady". There is a photo of her holding it in the "Awards" album in the group. In many shots of her on the set between scenes she sitting on a stool which is inscribed "From the Crew of The Lady Gambles".

When Barbara and Bill Holden presented the sound award Oscar to Star Wars, he broke away from the script to pay his own special tribute to the lady who was responsible for him not being sacked from Golden Boy, his first film. This impromptu speech can be seen on You Tube, and it really is very touching. Four years later when Barbara was awarded an Honorary Oscar, she dedicated it to her beloved friend who had died six months earlier, "He always wished that I would win an Oscar, and so tonight my Golden Boy, you got your wish". That really is a tearjerker, and can also been seen on You Tube.

Barbara did have problems with Bette, who was already showing signs of temperament when they were filming So Big. She told the William Wellman director that Bette was "an egocentric little bitch". She said years later with grudging admiration that she knew that Bette would succeed because "she had such ruthless ambition." They were never friends, but I think that they respected each other, and there are some great photo's of them taken in the 1970's. Although I have to say that Barbara who was nine months older than Bette looked a good 20 years younger.

Incidentally Joan Crawford was one of Barbara's oldest friends, and you will see plenty of letters to each other in the files section of my group.

I have the book that was published last year, it is more than 1000 pages, and is only Volume one and goes up to 1940. It took her 15 years to complete, I just hope that I live long enough to read Volume 2. . Considering how long it took her to write it there are some very careless mistakes, including a 1942 photo which is dated 1934.

I went to Hollywood in 1979 and met Betty Barker, Joan Crawford's secretary. She drove me to Barbara's home where I stood outside taking photo's. Little did I know that just two years later I would finally meet her in New York.

There used to be a series of John Player Lectures at The National Film Theatre in the 1970's, and that was where I saw Bette Davis for the first time. Joan Bakewell interviewed her and eventually asked the audience if they would like to ask her any questions. I stood up shaking in my shoes and asked her if she had any ambition to be a director. She fixed me with a gimlet glare, and then said "NO, but I wouldn't mind being a producer, I rather like the idea of bossing all those men around. "
A few months later they showed an edited version on TV, and I couldn't believe it when they showed my bit. Unfortunately this was before videos, so I don't have it on film. They often show clips from that interview on the BBC, but not my bit, hopefully I might see it again one day.

In 1975 Bette toured the UK with her one woman show, chatting to the audience, asking questions inbetween showing clips of her films. I saw her at the London Palladium but didn't have the nerve to speak to her on that occasion.

She made her grand entrance, puffing on a cigarette, looked at the audience, and snapped, "What a dump!" (which of course is that famous line from Beyond the Forest)
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Old 09-06-2014, 15:13
Walter Neff
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How would you rate Clift in the pantheon, Walter? He's my favourite actor. Happened to catch The Young Lions on telly years ago, and I'm not into War Films generally, but I found him mesmerising. Didn't know then obviously that it was his first post crash film.

Sought out his other films, and there's just something about his presence. Even in films I don't really rate that highly he's startling. My favourite performances are probably the aforementioned, Wild River, From Here to Eternity, The Search and an astonishing cameo in Judgement at Nurenberg. Read the Bosworth biography, which is brilliant but can be a hard read as his demons overtook him.
I rate him very highly Michael, it was just so tragic that the early promise he showed wasn't maintained in those sad later years. It has been a long time since I saw Raintree County, but I thought that was the film where you could seem him both pre and post crash. I loved him in The Heiress and From Here to Eternity, did you know that he turned down the role that made Bill Holden a box office star in Sunset Boulevard? I found it painful to watch him in Suddenly Last Summer, he seemed to be more vulnerable than Taylor, who was playing his patient in that film.

I did have the Patricia Bosworth book years ago, that was one of several biographys that I loaned out and never saw again.
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Old 09-06-2014, 15:50
Michael_Eve
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I rate him very highly Michael, it was just so tragic that the early promise he showed wasn't maintained in those sad later years. It has been a long time since I saw Raintree County, but I thought that was the film where you could seem him both pre and post crash. I loved him in The Heiress and From Here to Eternity, did you know that he turned down the role that made Bill Holden a box office star in Sunset Boulevard? I found it painful to watch him in Suddenly Last Summer, he seemed to be more vulnerable than Taylor, who was playing his patient in that film.

I did have the Patricia Bosworth book years ago, that was one of several biographys that I loaned out and never saw again.
Know what you mean about Suddenly Last Summer, and think the same applied with Lee Remick and Marilyn Monroe in later films. I found Raintree County a hard watch partly because I don't think it's very good, but also because of the before and after crash scenes. Poor bloke. Personally found him very watchable right up to the end; even makes his last film, The Defector, interesting even though he's clearly not a well man.

Sorry, veering OT, but thanks for the insights.
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Old 09-06-2014, 15:54
Hildaonpluto
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I look forward to you joining us, you will be very welcome, as will any other genuine movie buff.

I have met several stars over the past 60 years. There used to be a regular annual event in the late 1940's, The Sunday Pictorial Film Garden Party, which was held at Morden Hall Park. I first went in 1948 and that was where I saw my favourites at the time like Margaret Lockwood and Jean Kent in the flesh. The first Hollywood star that I saw was Burt Lancaster at the height of his stardom in 1951.

I met Deborah Kerr in 1972 when she invited some fans into her dressing room when she was starring in Candida in Shaftesbury Avenue. We had our photo taken together and there is a copy of it in the files section of my Stanwyck group. She was without doubt the friendliest, and the loveliest star that I have ever seen.

I did see Marilyn when she gave a press reception at the Savoy Hotel in 1956 when she came here to film The Prince and the Showgirl with Laurence Olivier. Sadly, I didn't have a camera in those days, I could have got some great shots as she leaned out of the window waving, and she was gorgeous from where I was standing.

Barbara was loved by the Crew, the electricians, and all the backroom guys on her films. She was just about the only star that I ever heard of getting presented with a gift from the Crew at the end of filming. In The Great Man's Lady she played a character who aged from 16 to 112. At the end of filming she was presented with a carving of herself as the old lady, and it was inscribed, "To the Crews Great Lady". There is a photo of her holding it in the "Awards" album in the group. In many shots of her on the set between scenes she sitting on a stool which is inscribed "From the Crew of The Lady Gambles".

When Barbara and Bill Holden presented the sound award Oscar to Star Wars, he broke away from the script to pay his own special tribute to the lady who was responsible for him not being sacked from Golden Boy, his first film. This impromptu speech can be seen on You Tube, and it really is very touching. Four years later when Barbara was awarded an Honorary Oscar, she dedicated it to her beloved friend who had died six months earlier, "He always wished that I would win an Oscar, and so tonight my Golden Boy, you got your wish". That really is a tearjerker, and can also been seen on You Tube.

Barbara did have problems with Bette, who was already showing signs of temperament when they were filming So Big. She told the William Wellman director that Bette was "an egocentric little bitch". She said years later with grudging admiration that she knew that Bette would succeed because "she had such ruthless ambition." They were never friends, but I think that they respected each other, and there are some great photo's of them taken in the 1970's. Although I have to say that Barbara who was nine months older than Bette looked a good 20 years younger.

Incidentally Joan Crawford was one of Barbara's oldest friends, and you will see plenty of letters to each other in the files section of my group.

I have the book that was published last year, it is more than 1000 pages, and is only Volume one and goes up to 1940. It took her 15 years to complete, I just hope that I live long enough to read Volume 2. . Considering how long it took her to write it there are some very careless mistakes, including a 1942 photo which is dated 1934.

I went to Hollywood in 1979 and met Betty Barker, Joan Crawford's secretary. She drove me to Barbara's home where I stood outside taking photo's. Little did I know that just two years later I would finally meet her in New York.

There used to be a series of John Player Lectures at The National Film Theatre in the 1970's, and that was where I saw Bette Davis for the first time. Joan Bakewell interviewed her and eventually asked the audience if they would like to ask her any questions. I stood up shaking in my shoes and asked her if she had any ambition to be a director. She fixed me with a gimlet glare, and then said "NO, but I wouldn't mind being a producer, I rather like the idea of bossing all those men around. "
A few months later they showed an edited version on TV, and I couldn't believe it when they showed my bit. Unfortunately this was before videos, so I don't have it on film. They often show clips from that interview on the BBC, but not my bit, hopefully I might see it again one day.

In 1975 Bette toured the UK with her one woman show, chatting to the audience, asking questions inbetween showing clips of her films. I saw her at the London Palladium but didn't have the nerve to speak to her on that occasion.

She made her grand entrance, puffing on a cigarette, looked at the audience, and snapped, "What a dump!" (which of course is that famous line from Beyond the Forest)
I bet youve got some fantastic tales to tell!Your stories about Bette Davis made me chuckle. I recall hearing she waa defiant in character to the end provactively posing at the 1989 Cannes Film festival for the worlds media just a few days before she died.

Did Bette feud with anybody else?

May I ask you please to list your top ten leading ladies in order of preference when you have time?

Also interested in your thoughts on Lana Turner and Greta Garbo.The latter I adore in terms of screen presence but she has a lot of mystique.
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Old 09-06-2014, 16:53
Walter Neff
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I bet youve got some fantastic tales to tell!Your stories about Bette Davis made me chuckle. I recall hearing she waa defiant in character to the end provactively posing at the 1989 Cannes Film festival for the worlds media just a few days before she died.

Did Bette feud with anybody else?

May I ask you please to list your top ten leading ladies in order of preference when you have time?

Also interested in your thoughts on Lana Turner and Greta Garbo.The latter I adore in terms of screen presence but she has a lot of mystique.
Bette always said that she and Joan never feuded, and that they were both too professional, just totally different personalities. Although friends and acquaintances said that they always hated each other.

Bette said that the most difficult actress that she ever worked with was Miriam Hopkins. Once when she went to dinner with actor/director Bryan Forbes he asked her whatever happened to Miriam. Bette replied, "God was very good, he took her away from us."

She said that Faye Dunaway was most unprofessional actress that she ever worked with.

She was very fond of Anne Baxter, who of course was so brilliant playing the title role in All About Eve. She also admired Mary Astor, and when Mary won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar as the concert pianist in Bette's The Great Lie, she thanked two people, Tchaikovsky, and Bette Davis.

Difficult to list just ten favourites, I have so many, but the top three never change :

1. Barbara Stanwyck

2. Geraldine Page

3. Anne Baxter

4. Ida Lupino

5. Rosalind Russell

6. Lana Turner

7. Marilyn Monroe

8. Joan Fontaine

9. Marlene Dietrich

10. Joan Crawford

As you can see, Lana is a big favourite, she became a good actress and had real star quality. There are very few actresses that I didn't like but I never cared for Garbo, she always seemed the same to me, I could never see the appeal of Ingrid Bergman or Rita Hayworth either.
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Old 09-06-2014, 17:43
Hildaonpluto
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Bette always said that she and Joan never feuded, and that they were both too professional, just totally different personalities. Although friends and acquaintances said that they always hated each other.

Bette said that the most difficult actress that she ever worked with was Miriam Hopkins. Once when she went to dinner with actor/director Bryan Forbes he asked her whatever happened to Miriam. Bette replied, "God was very good, he took her away from us."

She said that Faye Dunaway was most unprofessional actress that she ever worked with.

She was very fond of Anne Baxter, who of course was so brilliant playing the title role in All About Eve. She also admired Mary Astor, and when Mary won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar as the concert pianist in Bette's The Great Lie, she thanked two people, Tchaikovsky, and Bette Davis.

Difficult to list just ten favourites, I have so many, but the top three never change :

1. Barbara Stanwyck

2. Geraldine Page

3. Anne Baxter

4. Ida Lupino

5. Rosalind Russell

6. Lana Turner

7. Marilyn Monroe

8. Joan Fontaine

9. Marlene Dietrich

10. Joan Crawford

As you can see, Lana is a big favourite, she became a good actress and had real star quality. There are very few actresses that I didn't like but I never cared for Garbo, she always seemed the same to me, I could never see the appeal of Ingrid Bergman or Rita Hayworth either.

Thank you

Number 2 and 4 on the list Im not overfamiliar with their work.Is there a stand out best film for each actress that youd recommend please?
I get the feeling that if Bette Davis took against you there was nothing down for you but equally was very emotionally warm and loyal to those she clicked with.For some reason Id have loved for Bette Davis and Marilyn Monroe to have worked together as I think the tales years later would have been pure gossip gold!

Do you know when part 2 of Barbara Stanwycks autobiography will be published?

I quite like Jane Russell too but Im not sure shes widely viewed as a great.Ive partially ploughed through a Garbo biography-I really do think oneday Hollywood will make a movie based on her life.

Am I right in assuming that theres no legendary film directors from this era left?I vaguely remember about 10 years ago a famous director who favoured Bette Davis dying aged 100?
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Old 09-06-2014, 18:32
Walter Neff
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Thank you

Number 2 and 4 on the list Im not overfamiliar with their work.Is there a stand out best film for each actress that youd recommend please?
I get the feeling that if Bette Davis took against you there was nothing down for you but equally was very emotionally warm and loyal to those she clicked with.For some reason Id have loved for Bette Davis and Marilyn Monroe to have worked together as I think the tales years later would have been pure gossip gold!

Do you know when part 2 of Barbara Stanwycks autobiography will be published?

I quite like Jane Russell too but Im not sure shes widely viewed as a great.Ive partially ploughed through a Garbo biography-I really do think oneday Hollywood will make a movie based on her life.

Am I right in assuming that theres no legendary film directors from this era left?I vaguely remember about 10 years ago a famous director who favoured Bette Davis dying aged 100?
You are spoiled for choice with Geraldine Page she was Nominated eight times for an Oscar before she finally won in 1985 for The Trip to Bountiful, and died just two years later aged 67. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, the film that did it for me was Sweet Bird of Youth with Paul Newman. They can be seen on You Tube and are available on DVD.

Ida Lupino was probably the most underrated actress in Hollywood. Born in London in 1918, the god daughter of Ivor Novello she made her film debut aged just 14. She went to Hollywood in 1934 to play the lead in Alice in Wonderland, but she was considered too mature for the role. She played several small roles until she made a big hit in The Light That Failed with Ronald Colman in 1939. She was great at playing hard luck dames in such films as They Drive by Night, with Bogart and George Raft, The Sea Wolf with Edward G Robinson, and High Sierra with Bogart. She always seemed to get the roles that Bette Davis rejected at Warner's including The Hard Way which won for her The New York Critics Award, the only award she ever received. She never got a single Oscar Nomination. My favourite of all her films is Road House in which she starred with Richard Widmark in 1948. She played a nightclub singer in this exciting thriller, and plays the piano and sings/croaks, "One for My Baby" . As Celeste Holm said about her character, "She can do more without a voice than anyone I have ever heard." I have the Special Edition DVD, and it can also be seen on You Tube.

In 1951 Ida starred in The Bigamist with Joan Fontaine who was married to Collier Young, the screenplay writer who Ida had divorced in 1951. She had some more good films, particularly The Big Knife and While the City Sleeps. When film offers dried up she switched to directing with The Outrage, Hard Fast and Beautiful, and one of my favourites, The Trouble With Angels, with Rosalind Russell and Hayley Mills. She ended up by being a very much respected director.

Like many of the older stars Ida switched to TV and one of the films was The Letters, three different stories in a story all connected to letters that had been lost in a plane crash, and eventually arrived late to affect many lives. Ida appeared in one, Jane Powell and John Forsyth in another, with Barbara Stanwyck, Dina Merrill and Leslie Nielson in the third story.

Ida died in 1995 aged 77 following a stroke.

The director Vincent Sherman was just one month away from his 100th birthday when he died in 2006. He directed Bette Joan and Ida, but sadly Barbara never worked with him. He had the distinction of having affairs with both Bette and Joan, mainly he said because they were easier to work with when he was keeping them satisfied.

You may recall that Bette and Marilyn did have two scenes together in All About Eve, remember when George Sanders introduces Marilyn to her as, "A graduate from the Copacabana school of Dramatic Art"

I liked Jane Russell, she was terrific in comedy, and just great with Marilyn in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.

I haven't got a clue when Volume 2 of the Barbara biography will be published, if it takes another 15 years I doubt whether I will be around to read it!
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Old 10-06-2014, 02:04
Hildaonpluto
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You are spoiled for choice with Geraldine Page she was Nominated eight times for an Oscar before she finally won in 1985 for The Trip to Bountiful, and died just two years later aged 67. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, the film that did it for me was Sweet Bird of Youth with Paul Newman. They can be seen on You Tube and are available on DVD.

Ida Lupino was probably the most underrated actress in Hollywood. Born in London in 1918, the god daughter of Ivor Novello she made her film debut aged just 14. She went to Hollywood in 1934 to play the lead in Alice in Wonderland, but she was considered too mature for the role. She played several small roles until she made a big hit in The Light That Failed with Ronald Colman in 1939. She was great at playing hard luck dames in such films as They Drive by Night, with Bogart and George Raft, The Sea Wolf with Edward G Robinson, and High Sierra with Bogart. She always seemed to get the roles that Bette Davis rejected at Warner's including The Hard Way which won for her The New York Critics Award, the only award she ever received. She never got a single Oscar Nomination. My favourite of all her films is Road House in which she starred with Richard Widmark in 1948. She played a nightclub singer in this exciting thriller, and plays the piano and sings/croaks, "One for My Baby" . As Celeste Holm said about her character, "She can do more without a voice than anyone I have ever heard." I have the Special Edition DVD, and it can also be seen on You Tube.

In 1951 Ida starred in The Bigamist with Joan Fontaine who was married to Collier Young, the screenplay writer who Ida had divorced in 1951. She had some more good films, particularly The Big Knife and While the City Sleeps. When film offers dried up she switched to directing with The Outrage, Hard Fast and Beautiful, and one of my favourites, The Trouble With Angels, with Rosalind Russell and Hayley Mills. She ended up by being a very much respected director.

Like many of the older stars Ida switched to TV and one of the films was The Letters, three different stories in a story all connected to letters that had been lost in a plane crash, and eventually arrived late to affect many lives. Ida appeared in one, Jane Powell and John Forsyth in another, with Barbara Stanwyck, Dina Merrill and Leslie Nielson in the third story.

Ida died in 1995 aged 77 following a stroke.

The director Vincent Sherman was just one month away from his 100th birthday when he died in 2006. He directed Bette Joan and Ida, but sadly Barbara never worked with him. He had the distinction of having affairs with both Bette and Joan, mainly he said because they were easier to work with when he was keeping them satisfied.

You may recall that Bette and Marilyn did have two scenes together in All About Eve, remember when George Sanders introduces Marilyn to her as, "A graduate from the Copacabana school of Dramatic Art"

I liked Jane Russell, she was terrific in comedy, and just great with Marilyn in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.

I haven't got a clue when Volume 2 of the Barbara biography will be published, if it takes another 15 years I doubt whether I will be around to read it!

Vincent Sherman thats him!What a naughty man but then what a task keeping those two happy!

Id forgotten about All About Eve I need shooting!Did they ever reference each other in interviews?I know Joan Crawford wasnt fussy on Elizabeth Taylor.

Im definitely going to have to check out Ida and Geraldine.Its strange how certain ones get overlooked in terms of hollywood history.Perhaps neither lady had a scandalous enough private life ?!Some actors away from filming dont play the game of the hollywood social scene and I suspect sometimes that plays a part in whos feted.

Well you may be another Luise Rainer so you may well live to see Ms Stanwycks part 2!

Oh btw do you rate Luise Rainer?Feels odd we havent mentioned thus far the legendary Katherine Hepburn and Grace Kelly!Still so many names to discuss perhaps the thread title should change!
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Old 10-06-2014, 06:40
Walter Neff
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Vincent Sherman thats him!What a naughty man but then what a task keeping those two happy!

Id forgotten about All About Eve I need shooting!Did they ever reference each other in interviews?I know Joan Crawford wasnt fussy on Elizabeth Taylor.

Im definitely going to have to check out Ida and Geraldine.Its strange how certain ones get overlooked in terms of hollywood history.Perhaps neither lady had a scandalous enough private life ?!Some actors away from filming dont play the game of the hollywood social scene and I suspect sometimes that plays a part in whos feted.

Well you may be another Luise Rainer so you may well live to see Ms Stanwycks part 2!

Oh btw do you rate Luise Rainer?Feels odd we havent mentioned thus far the legendary Katherine Hepburn and Grace Kelly!Still so many names to discuss perhaps the thread title should change!
I think it is marvellous that a thread that you began on a minor actress who I liked very much should have grown into such a continuing success, and it is a nice tribute to her that it carries on with her name headlining it.

I love Katharine Hepburn, even if she isn't in my top ten, although I don't think that she deserved her first Oscar for Morning Glory, I watched it recently and thought that she was incredibly hammy. I was also very sad that Barbara didn't get the lead opposite Henry Fonda in On Golden Pond. He always said that he fell in love with her when they starred together in the sublime The Lady Eve, and he made no secret of the fact that she was his favourite leading lady. I think that they would have been terrific together in what turned out to be his last film, and she would have probably have won that elusive Oscar that year, although coincidentally that was the year she was presented with a well deserved Honorary Oscar.

I was not a big fan of Grace Kelly although I do like both Rear Window and Dial M for Murder. I think just about everyone agrees that her Oscar for The Country Girl should have gone to Judy Garland for A Star is Born that year. I believe that Hollywood can sometimes get carried away with an actress who scrapes her hair back, put on a pair of glasses, and wipes off her makeup, and they confuse that daring new look with great acting!

Bette did remark that she always knew that Marilyn would be a star. It is interesting to see that everyone else reached their peak in All About Eve, and that Marilyn's career was the only one that went up and not down.

I have mixed feelings about Luise Rainer, her time in Hollywood was so brief, and yet she won a Best Actress Oscar two years in succession. I haven't seen The Good Earth for years so I can't really judge her performance, but that was the year that Barbara was expected to win for Stella Dallas. She was usually very modest, but was so disappointed about losing that year that she was unusually outspoken saying, "I put my life's blood in that role, and I SHOULD have won!"

As for me living to Luise Rainer's age, well my friends say that I will reach a Century, I am in the gym four times a week, and completed my first London Marathon last year.

I wrote a fortnightly article for my local newspaper about my four months training, and if you Google "Faversham's Fittest Pensioner" you can see the last article that I wrote describing my experience on the day of the Marathon.

Incidentally, do you know the name of the Classic Film Noir that I got my Forum name from?
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Old 10-06-2014, 10:28
Hildaonpluto
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I think it is marvellous that a thread that you began on a minor actress who I liked very much should have grown into such a continuing success, and it is a nice tribute to her that it carries on with her name headlining it.

I love Katharine Hepburn, even if she isn't in my top ten, although I don't think that she deserved her first Oscar for Morning Glory, I watched it recently and thought that she was incredibly hammy. I was also very sad that Barbara didn't get the lead opposite Henry Fonda in On Golden Pond. He always said that he fell in love with her when they starred together in the sublime The Lady Eve, and he made no secret of the fact that she was his favourite leading lady. I think that they would have been terrific together in what turned out to be his last film, and she would have probably have won that elusive Oscar that year, although coincidentally that was the year she was presented with a well deserved Honorary Oscar.

I was not a big fan of Grace Kelly although I do like both Rear Window and Dial M for Murder. I think just about everyone agrees that her Oscar for The Country Girl should have gone to Judy Garland for A Star is Born that year. I believe that Hollywood can sometimes get carried away with an actress who scrapes her hair back, put on a pair of glasses, and wipes off her makeup, and they confuse that daring new look with great acting!

Bette did remark that she always knew that Marilyn would be a star. It is interesting to see that everyone else reached their peak in All About Eve, and that Marilyn's career was the only one that went up and not down.

I have mixed feelings about Luise Rainer, her time in Hollywood was so brief, and yet she won a Best Actress Oscar two years in succession. I haven't seen The Good Earth for years so I can't really judge her performance, but that was the year that Barbara was expected to win for Stella Dallas. She was usually very modest, but was so disappointed about losing that year that she was unusually outspoken saying, "I put my life's blood in that role, and I SHOULD have won!"

As for me living to Luise Rainer's age, well my friends say that I will reach a Century, I am in the gym four times a week, and completed my first London Marathon last year.

I wrote a fortnightly article for my local newspaper about my four months training, and if you Google "Faversham's Fittest Pensioner" you can see the last article that I wrote describing my experience on the day of the Marathon.

Incidentally, do you know the name of the Classic Film Noir that I got my Forum name from?
Arr Thank you!I suppose thats the best way too look at it-This thread is a wonderful tribute to the headliner actress in the title while being a wonderful feat of film buff serendipity!

I never realised that Luise Rainer beat Barbara Stanwyck to an oscar.That explains your ambigous feelings.I think Luise would almost certainly have had a good but unsteady or uneven career in Hollywood had she off stayed and would likely have been an actress employed into her 70s and 80s but alas it wasnt to be.I think its true to say that in terms of formal recognition Barbara Stanwyck for the most part was largely unappreciated by Hollywood.
With regards to Grace Kelly,I doubt shed have had a great career post 50ish had she not became a princess.Star quality rather than outstanding acting perhaps?I just feel maybe that her marriage into royalty allows many of us to think that her career was thrawted by royal duties but perhaps her career was always going to be timelimited.She certainly didnt have the talent of Barbara Stanwyck ,Bette Davis or Joan Fontaine!

For some reason I always imagined Bette and Marilyn clashing but perhaps thats my desire for high camp rather than an objective view!

And with the assistance of google as a memory prompt I can now say I always knew that I always knew Walter Neff is from the rather excellent Double Indemnity!

Hildaonpluto has no such prestigious origins as a username!

Do you know much about the whos who of friendships in Old Hollywood?

Who for insistence were Barbara Stanwycks,Joan Crawfords,Lauren Bacalls and Elizabeth Taylors close Hollywood pals?
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Old 10-06-2014, 11:00
Walter Neff
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Arr Thank you!I suppose thats the best way too look at it-This thread is a wonderful tribute to the headliner actress in the title while being a wonderful feat of film buff serendipity!

I never realised that Luise Rainer beat Barbara Stanwyck to an oscar.That explains your ambigous feelings.I think Luise would almost certainly have had a good but unsteady or uneven career in Hollywood had she off stayed and would likely have been an actress employed into her 70s and 80s but alas it wasnt to be.I think its true to say that in terms of formal recognition Barbara Stanwyck for the most part was largely unappreciated by Hollywood.
With regards to Grace Kelly,I doubt shed have had a great career post 50ish had she not became a princess.Star quality rather than outstanding acting perhaps?I just feel maybe that her marriage into royalty allows many of us to think that her career was thrawted by royal duties but perhaps her career was always going to be timelimited.She certainly didnt have the talent of Barbara Stanwyck ,Bette Davis or Joan Fontaine!

For some reason I always imagined Bette and Marilyn clashing but perhaps thats my desire for high camp rather than an objective view!

And with the assistance of google as a memory prompt I can now say I always knew that I always knew Walter Neff is from the rather excellent Double Indemnity!

Hildaonpluto has no such prestigious origins as a username!

Do you know much about the whos who of friendships in Old Hollywood?

Who for insistence were Barbara Stanwycks,Joan Crawfords,Lauren Bacalls and Elizabeth Taylors close Hollywood pals?
Barbara's closest friend was Nancy Sinatra Snr, I guess that they were kindred spirits, both being dumped by their husband's for younger women in 1950. Her other good friend was director Peter Godfey and his wife Renee. He directed her in Christmas in Connecticut, The Two Mrs Carrolls and Cry Wolf. When they both died within a year of each other Barbara became guardian of their three daughters in 1964. Joan Crawford was probably her oldest friend who she had known since going to Hollywood in 1929. Whenever Barbara went to New York she always dined with Joan at the famous bar/restaurant, Upstairs at 21. Sadly for Bacall she has outlived most of her best friends, including Katie Hepburn, Roddy Mcdowell, and David Niven. Roddy was probably also Liz Taylor's best friend. Joan Rivers paid him a great compliment by saying that Roddy knew all the secret's, and that's how they stayed with him., secret!
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Old 10-06-2014, 11:11
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Barbara's closest friend was Nancy Sinatra Snr, I guess that they were kindred spirits, both being dumped by their husband's for younger women in 1950. Her other good friend was director Peter Godfey and his wife Renee. He directed her in Christmas in Connecticut, The Two Mrs Carrolls and Cry Wolf. When they both died within a year of each other Barbara became guardian of their three daughters in 1964. Joan Crawford was probably her oldest friend who she had known since going to Hollywood in 1929. Whenever Barbara went to New York she always dined with Joan at the famous bar/restaurant, Upstairs at 21. Sadly for Bacall she has outlived most of her best friends, including Katie Hepburn, Roddy Mcdowell, and David Niven. Roddy was probably also Liz Taylor's best friend. Joan Rivers paid him a great compliment by saying that Roddy knew all the secret's, and that's how they stayed with him., secret!
On the basis they shared a mutual close friend in Roddy McDowell were Lauren Bacall and Elizabeth Taylor ever really good friends?They strike me as very different but not wholly incompatiable as friends.
I think Roddy knew a heck of a lot but gentlemen never do rat on their friends!

Was there anybody whom Barbara Stanwyck ,Lauren Bacall and Ginger Rogers feuded with?

Ive said this before but I think its going to be so surreal when the last hollywood legend dies and theres no one left.Long may they stay with with us!

Im going to check out your newspaper article shortly.
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Old 10-06-2014, 11:14
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Walter Barbaras life sounds fascinating and a fertile rich tapestry for a quality film.Would you like there to be a film made of Barbaras life by Hollywood and who would you like to play her?
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Old 10-06-2014, 12:52
Walter Neff
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On the basis they shared a mutual close friend in Roddy McDowell were Lauren Bacall and Elizabeth Taylor ever really good friends?They strike me as very different but not wholly incompatiable as friends.
I think Roddy knew a heck of a lot but gentlemen never do rat on their friends!

Was there anybody whom Barbara Stanwyck ,Lauren Bacall and Ginger Rogers feuded with?

Ive said this before but I think its going to be so surreal when the last hollywood legend dies and theres no one left.Long may they stay with with us!

Im going to check out your newspaper article shortly.
I don't know much about Ginger Rogers, except that I always found her a phoney, especially after her cheesy curtain speech at Drury Lane at the end of "Mame" in 1969, but then anyone who is always waffling on about their religion and God always gets my back up.

I love Lauren Bacall as an actress, I was lucky enough to see her on stage in Applause, the musical version of All About Eve. Having seen her behaviour towards fans, I wasn't too impressed with her as a person. The evening I met Deborah Kerr, Bacall came out of the stage door after visiting her. I had heard of her reputation so didn't approach her, but when two fans asked for her autograph she snarled, "No, come and see my show!" When Deborah said to me how much she enjoyed meeting her fans I said that it was a shame Miss Bacall wasn't as gracious. Deborah laughed and said, "Oh poor Betty. she does have a few hang ups."

In the 68 years that I have been a fan of Barbara, I have only heard of two actresses who didn't like her, both Cyd Charisse and Maureen O'Sullivan said that she was a very cold person, Although O'Sullivan did say, "There, I am the first person to say anything nasty about Barbara Stanwyck." I think that we all come across people who we don't warm to, we wouldn't be human if we liked everyone we met.

So I go along with director Frank Capra who actually clashed with her when she went for her first audition because she so was shy and scared. They ended up by becoming lifelong friends, and he paid tribute to her when I saw her at The Lincoln Centre, this is what he said:

"She was destined to be beloved by all directors, actors, crews, and extra's. In a Hollywood popularity contest she would win first prize hands down."
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Old 10-06-2014, 12:59
Walter Neff
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Walter Barbaras life sounds fascinating and a fertile rich tapestry for a quality film.Would you like there to be a film made of Barbaras life by Hollywood and who would you like to play her?
I honestly have no idea, I don't know any of today's actresses, they all look the same to me. The only time I go to the cinema is if there is a new film with Maggie Smith or Meryl Streep, who I do think has the personality and magic of the old stars.

I see another name on the list has died, 89 year old Martha Hyer was never a big name. I can only think of two of her films, Sabrina and Some Came Running, for which she received her only Best Supporting Actress Oscar Nomination.
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Old 10-06-2014, 13:49
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http://m.santafenewmexican.com/news/....html?mode=jqm

Article on Martha Hyers Death
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Old 10-06-2014, 14:01
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I don't know much about Ginger Rogers, except that I always found her a phoney, especially after her cheesy curtain speech at Drury Lane at the end of "Mame" in 1969, but then anyone who is always waffling on about their religion and God always gets my back up.

I love Lauren Bacall as an actress, I was lucky enough to see her on stage in Applause, the musical version of All About Eve. Having seen her behaviour towards fans, I wasn't too impressed with her as a person. The evening I met Deborah Kerr, Bacall came out of the stage door after visiting her. I had heard of her reputation so didn't approach her, but when two fans asked for her autograph she snarled, "No, come and see my show!" When Deborah said to me how much she enjoyed meeting her fans I said that it was a shame Miss Bacall wasn't as gracious. Deborah laughed and said, "Oh poor Betty. she does have a few hang ups."

In the 68 years that I have been a fan of Barbara, I have only heard of two actresses who didn't like her, both Cyd Charisse and Maureen O'Sullivan said that she was a very cold person, Although O'Sullivan did say, "There, I am the first person to say anything nasty about Barbara Stanwyck." I think that we all come across people who we don't warm to, we wouldn't be human if we liked everyone we met.

So I go along with director Frank Capra who actually clashed with her when she went for her first audition because she so was shy and scared. They ended up by becoming lifelong friends, and he paid tribute to her when I saw her at The Lincoln Centre, this is what he said:

"She was destined to be beloved by all directors, actors, crews, and extra's. In a Hollywood popularity contest she would win first prize hands down."
If the crew and less "important" behind the scenes people rated Barbara then to me that says a lot because many people arent that nice to the behind the scenes,crew ,gaffers etc and a geniune soul wouldnt treat people any worse or better decency wise according to status.If the crew like you your a good egg!

Ive always sensed Lauren Bacall is a natural comedienne and may carry some of that brittleness over to real life!I adore her but shes not perfect and I wouldnt want to catch her on a bad day!

Did Greta Garbo mix in much on the hollywood social scene?

I never knew Ginger Rogers had an iffy reputation!
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Old 10-06-2014, 19:35
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If the crew and less "important" behind the scenes people rated Barbara then to me that says a lot because many people arent that nice to the behind the scenes,crew ,gaffers etc and a geniune soul wouldnt treat people any worse or better decency wise according to status.If the crew like you your a good egg!

Ive always sensed Lauren Bacall is a natural comedienne and may carry some of that brittleness over to real life!I adore her but shes not perfect and I wouldnt want to catch her on a bad day!

Did Greta Garbo mix in much on the hollywood social scene?

I never knew Ginger Rogers had an iffy reputation!
Garbo seemed to me to be totally self obsessed, and sadly lacking any sense of humour. Practically every star worked at the Hollywood Canteen during the war years, but not Garbo. The canteen was created by Bette Davis and John Garfield so that servicemen on leave could meet and dance with their favourite stars.

Marlene Dietrich was also self obsessed and narcissistic, but she had a big heart. Bette said that she would never forget the night that Marlene arrived at the canteen painted from head to toe in gold paint. She had come straight from MGM studios where she had been filming Kismet. She proceeded to dance with any servicemen that asked her, and then went into the kitchen and spent the rest of the evening washing dishes.

I have an album in my group devoted to the Hollywood Canteen where you can see Barbara welcoming servicemen, and serving them from behind the counter. Warner's made a film about it, and it starred practically every actor at that studio, including Bette, Barbara, Joan, Ida, Jane Wyman, and many, many more.

As for Ginger Rogers, former co star Lyle Talbot talked of his experience when he met her a few years later, and said, "Something changed Ginger, because we were good friends while working together. Then some years later when she'd become successful at RKO, and I got from Ginger one of the first brush offs I ever had in my life. I couldn't believe it, from Ginger of all people. I said something about it to a friend who was under contact to the same studio, and his reaction wasn't one of surprise. More, 'Oh, Ginger... well, yeah,' Despite the refrain over the years about God and universal love, Ginger was developing a pattern of behaviour of pursuing her career. She expended her energies charming those who could help her, and conserved them the remainder of the time."

Paul Gregory who was the producer of a TV show The Pink Jungle, put it in to much stronger words :

"Ginger Rogers? She's one of the reasons that I left show business. The only other people that I dealt with who were almost as rotten as she were, Claudette Colbert, Charles Laughton, and Raymond Massey. Rogers is a totally manufactured commodity. We would give her a scene and she couldn't remember the lines. She couldn't sing, and more surprisingly she couldn't handle the dances when they were not all done in separate takes. And all through the horror of the show she would be there smiling and grinning, and utterly unreal. I don't mind her being a Christian Scientist, I just wish that she would put a little more emphasis on the Christian."

I have to agree about her "dancing" she was only 58 when I saw her in Mame at Drury Lane, but whatever she made have had in her hey day, it had certainly gone by then.

How different to Ann Miller who I saw in Sugar Babies at the Savoy Theatre in 1989 when she was well into her '60's, she could still dance up a storm, and belt out a song.
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Old 11-06-2014, 03:45
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Garbo seemed to me to be totally self obsessed, and sadly lacking any sense of humour. Practically every star worked at the Hollywood Canteen during the war years, but not Garbo. The canteen was created by Bette Davis and John Garfield so that servicemen on leave could meet and dance with their favourite stars.

Marlene Dietrich was also self obsessed and narcissistic, but she had a big heart. Bette said that she would never forget the night that Marlene arrived at the canteen painted from head to toe in gold paint. She had come straight from MGM studios where she had been filming Kismet. She proceeded to dance with any servicemen that asked her, and then went into the kitchen and spent the rest of the evening washing dishes.

I have an album in my group devoted to the Hollywood Canteen where you can see Barbara welcoming servicemen, and serving them from behind the counter. Warner's made a film about it, and it starred practically every actor at that studio, including Bette, Barbara, Joan, Ida, Jane Wyman, and many, many more.

As for Ginger Rogers, former co star Lyle Talbot talked of his experience when he met her a few years later, and said, "Something changed Ginger, because we were good friends while working together. Then some years later when she'd become successful at RKO, and I got from Ginger one of the first brush offs I ever had in my life. I couldn't believe it, from Ginger of all people. I said something about it to a friend who was under contact to the same studio, and his reaction wasn't one of surprise. More, 'Oh, Ginger... well, yeah,' Despite the refrain over the years about God and universal love, Ginger was developing a pattern of behaviour of pursuing her career. She expended her energies charming those who could help her, and conserved them the remainder of the time."

Paul Gregory who was the producer of a TV show The Pink Jungle, put it in to much stronger words :

"Ginger Rogers? She's one of the reasons that I left show business. The only other people that I dealt with who were almost as rotten as she were, Claudette Colbert, Charles Laughton, and Raymond Massey. Rogers is a totally manufactured commodity. We would give her a scene and she couldn't remember the lines. She couldn't sing, and more surprisingly she couldn't handle the dances when they were not all done in separate takes. And all through the horror of the show she would be there smiling and grinning, and utterly unreal. I don't mind her being a Christian Scientist, I just wish that she would put a little more emphasis on the Christian."

I have to agree about her "dancing" she was only 58 when I saw her in Mame at Drury Lane, but whatever she made have had in her hey day, it had certainly gone by then.

How different to Ann Miller who I saw in Sugar Babies at the Savoy Theatre in 1989 when she was well into her '60's, she could still dance up a storm, and belt out a song.
Ginger sounds a nightmare but Im hoping your not going to burst my bubble by the way and tell me Fred Astaire was just as manufactured as Rogers?:

Who would you say were Barbara Stanwycks favourite costars?

Youve seen many a big star on the stage.Have you ever seen Judi Dench,John Gielgud,Alec Guinness or Helen Mirren on stage?

I have seen the marathon newspaper article and Im very impressed!You put me to shame!


PS Cheers for mentioning Jane Wyman I loved Ms rule with an Iron fist Angela Channing!
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Old 11-06-2014, 06:21
Walter Neff
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Ginger sounds a nightmare but Im hoping your not going to burst my bubble by the way and tell me Fred Astaire was just as manufactured as Rogers?:

Who would you say were Barbara Stanwycks favourite costars?

Youve seen many a big star on the stage.Have you ever seen Judi Dench,John Gielgud,Alec Guinness or Helen Mirren on stage?

I have seen the marathon newspaper article and Im very impressed!You put me to shame!


PS Cheers for mentioning Jane Wyman I loved Ms rule with an Iron fist Angela Channing!
I'm glad to say that Fred seemed to be loved by everyone who ever worked with him, he was certainly a perfectionist, but he demanded no more from anyone else than he did of himself.

I have a documentary on Barbara in which she was asked who were her favourite leading men. She said that was very difficult as there were so many, but definitely Joel McCrea who she starred with in six films. She always said that he was responsible for persuading Sam Goldwyn to let her test for the role of Stella Dallas, he wasn't keen because he thought that she was too young. Needless to say when he saw the test he immediately offered her the role that earned her the first of four Oscar Nominations. Henry Fonda was also another favourite, and of course Bill Holden who she always called "My Golden Boy."

Robert Preston who starred with Barbara in Union Pacific and Golden Boy said that after working with Barbara he always measured every leading lady against her, because she set such a high standard. When he appeared as a guest on "Look Familiar" he undid his collar to show a St Genesis Medal that Barbara had given him when they were filming The Lady Gambles. He said that he never began a film without wearing that good luck charm.

Interesting that you should mention Falcon Crest because Barbara was first offered the role of Angela Channing and for some crazy reason she turned it down. She really was a lousy judge of scripts, in 1954 she turned down two of the biggest Box Office films of the year, Three Coins in the Fountain, and The High and the Mighty.

The only one of those names that you mention that I have seen on stage is Alec Guinness. I forget the name of the play but I do know that it was Margaret Leighton's last stage role, and by then she was already in a wheelchair as she was suffering from M.S.

I have seen Maggie Smith on stage three times, and each occasion was unforgettable, the first time was Noel Coward's Hay Fever at The Old Vic in 1964, also in the play were Dame Edith Evans, Lyn Redgrave and Derek Jacobi,

Other stars that I have seen on stage are Charles Laughton, Albert Finney, Margaret Lockwood Lauren Bacall, Deborah Kerr, and Margaret Rutherford. I also saw Judy Garland in concert several times, once with Liza Minnelli.

I guess my biggest thrill was sitting in the fifth row of the stalls at The Lincoln Centre when Bill Holden practically dragged Barbara on stage, I was so close that I could see that she was shaking with nerves. She was terrified of making public appearances, which is why she would never go on a chat show. Then the whole audience erupted, stamping their feet, and screaming and yelling "we love you." She later described it as "a beautiful shock." I don't think that she realised until to that moment just how much she was loved.

Glad that you liked the article, if you want to see more photo's go to

www.justgiving.com/Ray-Johnson3

Don't worry, I'm not asking for money that closed a year ago, but for some reason the page remains.
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Old 11-06-2014, 17:35
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I'm glad to say that Fred seemed to be loved by everyone who ever worked with him, he was certainly a perfectionist, but he demanded no more from anyone else than he did of himself.

I have a documentary on Barbara in which she was asked who were her favourite leading men. She said that was very difficult as there were so many, but definitely Joel McCrea who she starred with in six films. She always said that he was responsible for persuading Sam Goldwyn to let her test for the role of Stella Dallas, he wasn't keen because he thought that she was too young. Needless to say when he saw the test he immediately offered her the role that earned her the first of four Oscar Nominations. Henry Fonda was also another favourite, and of course Bill Holden who she always called "My Golden Boy."

Robert Preston who starred with Barbara in Union Pacific and Golden Boy said that after working with Barbara he always measured every leading lady against her, because she set such a high standard. When he appeared as a guest on "Look Familiar" he undid his collar to show a St Genesis Medal that Barbara had given him when they were filming The Lady Gambles. He said that he never began a film without wearing that good luck charm.

Interesting that you should mention Falcon Crest because Barbara was first offered the role of Angela Channing and for some crazy reason she turned it down. She really was a lousy judge of scripts, in 1954 she turned down two of the biggest Box Office films of the year, Three Coins in the Fountain, and The High and the Mighty.

The only one of those names that you mention that I have seen on stage is Alec Guinness. I forget the name of the play but I do know that it was Margaret Leighton's last stage role, and by then she was already in a wheelchair as she was suffering from M.S.

I have seen Maggie Smith on stage three times, and each occasion was unforgettable, the first time was Noel Coward's Hay Fever at The Old Vic in 1964, also in the play were Dame Edith Evans, Lyn Redgrave and Derek Jacobi,

Other stars that I have seen on stage are Charles Laughton, Albert Finney, Margaret Lockwood Lauren Bacall, Deborah Kerr, and Margaret Rutherford. I also saw Judy Garland in concert several times, once with Liza Minnelli.

I guess my biggest thrill was sitting in the fifth row of the stalls at The Lincoln Centre when Bill Holden practically dragged Barbara on stage, I was so close that I could see that she was shaking with nerves. She was terrified of making public appearances, which is why she would never go on a chat show. Then the whole audience erupted, stamping their feet, and screaming and yelling "we love you." She later described it as "a beautiful shock." I don't think that she realised until to that moment just how much she was loved.

Glad that you liked the article, if you want to see more photo's go to

www.justgiving.com/Ray-Johnson3

Don't worry, I'm not asking for money that closed a year ago, but for some reason the page remains.

I liked Barbara as Connie in The Colbys although I wish the role was meatier tbh.Do you know what she felt about her time on The Colbys and did she get on with Charlton Heston and Stephanie Beacham?I think I would have liked her to play a nemesis to Angela Channing in Falcon Crest!I find it hard now to imagine anyone but Jane Wyman playing Angela she really owned it!

Was Lauren Bacall good on stage or would you say shes more a screenactress?

Ive clicked on your link!Impressive!Will you be running again?
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Old 11-06-2014, 19:02
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I liked Barbara as Connie in The Colbys although I wish the role was meatier tbh.Do you know what she felt about her time on The Colbys and did she get on with Charlton Heston and Stephanie Beacham?I think I would have liked her to play a nemesis to Angela Channing in Falcon Crest!I find it hard now to imagine anyone but Jane Wyman playing Angela she really owned it!

Was Lauren Bacall good on stage or would you say shes more a screenactress?

Ive clicked on your link!Impressive!Will you be running again?
She always regretted agreeing to appear in The Colby's, and it wasn't long before she realised that she had made a big mistake saying "This is the biggest pile of garbage that I have ever done - it's lucky that I only signed for 13 episodes, I'll be surprised if it lasts half that long." She went to producer Aaron Spelling and told him that she had never walked out on a contract before, but she was going to leave the show. He asked her to reconsider, but she explained,

"I've played the same damn scene 24 times, it's one thing to know that you are making money out of vulgarity, but when you know it's vulgar, it's plain stupid!" She called the show "a turkey!"

I have lots of photo's of Barbara and Heston posing happily for publicity photo's, and when she won the Cecil B de Mille Golden Globe Award, she referred to him as "My beloved television brother, Charlton Heston." Stephanie Beecham said that she used to be enthralled with the stories that Barbara and Heston told her about the Old West.

I thought that Stephanie was fabulous as Sable, and loved the scenes that she and Barbara had together. Sadly Barbara was not well, and sometimes seemed to be hanging onto the furniture, she just didn't have the old fire or energy. That was what a lifetime of smoking did to her.

I thought that Bacall was great on stage, she had the personality suited to the theatre. Although I would loved to have seen Anne Baxter in Applause on Broadway. It must have been fascinating to see the actress who was so brilliant as Eve play Margo, her friend Bette Davis was certainly very impressed, saying, "You WERE Margo!"

I haven't done so much running this year, and when I took part in the Whitstable 10K on my 77th birthday it took me 90 minutes, my slowest time ever. I can't believe that I was running at least 40 miles a week when I was training for the London Marathon just 18 months ago. I did have tendonitis in my foot earlier in the year, but I am hoping to get back running regularly again. I would like to think tht I could run the London Marathon again.
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Old 12-06-2014, 16:42
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She always regretted agreeing to appear in The Colby's, and it wasn't long before she realised that she had made a big mistake saying "This is the biggest pile of garbage that I have ever done - it's lucky that I only signed for 13 episodes, I'll be surprised if it lasts half that long." She went to producer Aaron Spelling and told him that she had never walked out on a contract before, but she was going to leave the show. He asked her to reconsider, but she explained,

"I've played the same damn scene 24 times, it's one thing to know that you are making money out of vulgarity, but when you know it's vulgar, it's plain stupid!" She called the show "a turkey!"

I have lots of photo's of Barbara and Heston posing happily for publicity photo's, and when she won the Cecil B de Mille Golden Globe Award, she referred to him as "My beloved television brother, Charlton Heston." Stephanie Beecham said that she used to be enthralled with the stories that Barbara and Heston told her about the Old West.

I thought that Stephanie was fabulous as Sable, and loved the scenes that she and Barbara had together. Sadly Barbara was not well, and sometimes seemed to be hanging onto the furniture, she just didn't have the old fire or energy. That was what a lifetime of smoking did to her.

I thought that Bacall was great on stage, she had the personality suited to the theatre. Although I would loved to have seen Anne Baxter in Applause on Broadway. It must have been fascinating to see the actress who was so brilliant as Eve play Margo, her friend Bette Davis was certainly very impressed, saying, "You WERE Margo!"

I haven't done so much running this year, and when I took part in the Whitstable 10K on my 77th birthday it took me 90 minutes, my slowest time ever. I can't believe that I was running at least 40 miles a week when I was training for the London Marathon just 18 months ago. I did have tendonitis in my foot earlier in the year, but I am hoping to get back running regularly again. I would like to think tht I could run the London Marathon again.
Its good to hear Barbara chimed well friendship wise on The Colbys with cast even if she found the scripts lousy!Did she have any scenes with Joan Collins in The Colbys?I cant recall but I imagine/hope she did!
I really wish Id have gotten around to seeing old Hollywood star Angela Lansbury in Londons Westend this yearWhat an achievement at 88!
Anne Baxter was magic in All About Eve-I could imagine her having real presence on stage.

Is George Kennedy still alive by the way?

And does Peter Fonda fall under the golden era catchment?

Very best of luck with running another marathon but even if you dont youve already achieved a fantastic amount in this regard.Be proud.
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