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Old 05-08-2007, 16:12
flobadob
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Here's a Trabant ad. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sX8cY...elated&search=

I used to have one of them. On the flat, and with only one person in the car, it would go like the clappers, because they only weigh about as much as Kate Moss after a week at the health farm, but as soon as you had to go up the slightest hill or give a lift to a fat girlfriend, you were reminded of the fact that it only had a diddy engine.
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Old 05-08-2007, 16:24
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Here's a Trabant ad. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sX8cY...elated&search=

I used to have one of them. On the flat, and with only one person in the car, it would go like the clappers, because they only weigh about as much as Kate Moss after a week at the health farm, but as soon as you had to go up the slightest hill or give a lift to a fat girlfriend, you were reminded of the fact that it only had a diddy engine.
Weren't the bodies made from some sort of compressed paper, liable to be eaten by goats ? Or is that an urban myth ?
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Old 05-08-2007, 16:42
flobadob
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Weren't the bodies made from some sort of compressed paper, liable to be eaten by goats ? Or is that an urban myth ?
I always thought it was fibreglass, but according to wikipedia it was a sort of resin/cotton combination. At least it didn't rust, which is more than you can say for the floor. I could see the road surface through the holes in my Trabi's floor - if they got a big bigger I could have propelled the car like Fred Flintstone.
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Old 05-08-2007, 16:56
Darren Lethem
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Ah that ad is on page 1 of this thread.

I have always wanted to have a ride in one. I have seen one close up at the Checkpoint Charlie museum in Berlin but that's the nearest sadly.
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Old 05-08-2007, 17:55
Paul Evans
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And here's an equally recent commercial break from Cuban TV. The advertising block opens with an anti-American cartoon, and, ironically, promos for programs taken right off of American pay-TV channels. A Disney movie follows the break.
Yep, Communism in action! lol

It's actually amazing how many US shows are screened in Cuba. I was watching a live feed a few months ago and it was somewhat surprising to see episodes of 24, NCIS and CSI going out in what is supposedly a staunchly anti-US country...
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Old 05-08-2007, 20:33
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It happened on Christmas day, but wasn't shown live.

The trial, lead-up and the immediate aftermath of the execution on the Christmas Day news bulletins here. However according to Wikipedia, Romanian TV showed the footage a few days later.

I can't remember if the actual moment of execution has ever been shown, I certainly don't think the TV news would have shown it here.
I definitely remember seeing the executions. However, that might have been a one-off and in later bulletins they only showed the two bodies.
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Old 05-08-2007, 20:37
mrbernay
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Yep, Communism in action! lol

It's actually amazing how many US shows are screened in Cuba. I was watching a live feed a few months ago and it was somewhat surprising to see episodes of 24, NCIS and CSI going out in what is supposedly a staunchly anti-US country...
If you have Astra 19.2 degrees, you can see Cuba Vision which is a sort of Cuban World Service TV
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Old 05-08-2007, 20:40
DBC
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On product of communist era TV we saw here in the UK were the many excellent cartoon series. They made a change from the American ones such as Tom and Jerry and the Flintstones. But it's been so long I cannot remember any of the titles. Can anyone else ?
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Old 05-08-2007, 20:42
mrbernay
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Romania had "enlightened" TV in the early 70s. I remember when I was studying there in Summer 75, they had US police series on the TV. I particularly remember Kojak.
Darren L. Polish TV still uses the system of the "speaker" - they use the English word - who speaks all the parts, but you can still hear the original dialogue in the background although it is often too low to follow. For some reason the Poles refuse to get rid of this "bastardised" system in favour of either full dubbing or subtitles.
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Old 05-08-2007, 20:49
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FYI, Cuba Vision is showing a ballet. It could well be Swan Lake (don't know if it's an old Russian TV production from the Bolshoi), but I am not well up on that kind of thing. Their logo is, I think, based on the shape of the island, but it also looks like the head of a bird/cock
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Old 05-08-2007, 21:15
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If you have Astra 19.2 degrees, you can see Cuba Vision which is a sort of Cuban World Service TV
The official name of this service is Cubavision International. Cubavision is also one of Cuba's domestic networks.

You can see some screenshots of Cuban TV logos and idents HERE.
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Old 05-08-2007, 21:33
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Just to show how eclectic they are, they are now showing Arte en La Rampa: with street (read rap) singers with a Caribbean beat... Gives a good image of Cuba, so you might want to go on holiday there...
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Old 05-08-2007, 21:42
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Romania had "enlightened" TV in the early 70s. I remember when I was studying there in Summer 75, they had US police series on the TV. I particularly remember Kojak.
As Romania's fell into an economic crisis in the 1980s, Romanian TV became limited to just two hours a day.

HERE's an article about Romanian TV in the Ceausescu era.

BTW, in Yugoslavia, the most liberal communist country, the big hit of the 1970s was Peyton Place.
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Old 05-08-2007, 22:04
Paul Evans
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As Romania's fell into an economic crisis in the 1980s, Romanian TV became limited to just two hours a day.

HERE's an article about Romanian TV in the Ceausescu era.

BTW, in Yugoslavia, the most liberal communist country, the big hit of the 1970s was Peyton Place.
I've been trying to find some videos on YouTube for communist-era TV in Yugoslavia but haven't come up with anything. There was, however some interesting video clips of Bosnian news broadcasts "Dnevnik" shown shortly after the outbreak of war in 1992, showing loads of protesters in Sarajevo after what looked like a shooting, but of course I can't make out what they're saying.

Ok, it's not strictly speaking "Communist-era TV" (Bosnia wasn't Communist by 1992) but it's interesting from the perspective of seeing how the national media handled a deepening crisis on their own doorstep:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBbXRFzn1mo
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Old 05-08-2007, 22:15
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I've been trying to find some videos on YouTube for communist-era TV in Yugoslavia but haven't come up with anything.[/url]
Here's a compilation of clips and logos from communist-era Yugoslav TV stations:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCR1edzXsos

Each Yugoslav republic had its own broadcasting organization, even though the Serbo-Croat-speaking republics -- Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Montenegro -- had a more-or-less joint network. Slovenia and Macedonia, speaking different languages, were largely separate. Serbia's two autonomous provices, Vojvodina and Kosovo, also had TV stations of their own.
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Old 05-08-2007, 22:20
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Apparently a lot of Yugoslav TV programmes were destroyed during the civil war in the 1990s, hence a shortage of Yugoslavian programmes.

I have found that someone is selling Yugovizija (the selection where the Yugoslavian entry for Eurovision was chosen) from 1988 to the final one of 1992. I've ordered 1991 which had farcical voting, in where Serbia, Kosovo, Vojovodnija and Montenegro all voted for the Serbian song which was the actual Eurovision entry for Yugoslavia in 1991, but got no points from the other republics. The runner-up got maximum marks from the other republic, but none from the four who voted for Serbia and lost by 1pt!

I have to say, keep this up The North Korean stuff is surreall. It's like a rally and whenever Kim Jong-Il is mentioned they start shouting with a passion!
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Old 05-08-2007, 22:33
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THIS is how Slovenian children of the 1970s and '80 knew it was time for bed. These brief animations were used before, during, and after the evening advertising block.

UpsonPainter NN: Most of the programs that were destroyed were actually destroyed during NATO's bombing of Belgrade in 1999. The civil war itself only affected Sarajevo's station and its archives. The other stations were essentially unaffected.

The majority of Yugoslav-era TV material still exists, but it's now spread among six countries (and the archives of six national broadcasters).
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Old 05-08-2007, 22:46
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I've mentioned this in another thread, but if anyone is interested in the weird world of Serbian television today (well, two years ago), here's an interesting French-made documentary (with English narration) in its entirety:

Part 1

Part 2
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Old 05-08-2007, 23:04
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Two more things of possible interest before I retire for the night:

* One local TV station from what was then Yugoslavia was a big player in Italy and brought color to that country: ARTICLE.

* Here's a one-hour documentary from 2003 devoted to 35 years of TV news in Slovenia. It's in Slovenian, but there's plenty of historic behind-the-scenes footage: streaming RealVideo
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Old 06-08-2007, 02:33
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Here's another DRPK one:

"TV Broadcasting and Its Development in DPRK"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gnx3b685asU&NR=1

I'll try to watch that Slovenian news documentary tomorrow night - should be fun!

I actually caught that TV around the World programme on SBS when I was in Australia last year. They aired two of them - one on Serbian TV (as per your links) but I forget what the other programme was about. Having watched the live RTS feeds on www.rts.co.yu, there does seem to be an awful lot of talk shows, even now. Still, it's pretty useful for watching the Premiership at weekends!

Another interesting thing was Yugoslavia's entry in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1990. I caught a few of Tajci's music videos on YouTube (as well as the actual entry) and was surprised to see that as well as sounding similar to a lot of stuff released in Western Europe, they also had the same kind of production values that existed on a lot of the late 80's/early 90's dance and house videos that came out of the west as well (i.e. multi-layered chroma-keyed computer generated graphics overlaid on, or behind the singer).
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Old 06-08-2007, 07:34
flobadob
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If you can steer your dish around to 19.2 E, you can still watch a bit of Communist era news. CT24 (12382 Mhz, 27500 SR, horizontal) shows 25-year-old news bulletins from Czechoslovak TV at 18:49 local time. Very educational.

I've just discovered that they have all these bulletins online as well http://www.ct24.cz/vysilani/?porad=2...dp=10132488909

(pomalé means slow and rychlé means fast)

The interesting thing is that these archived news programmes are shown on the date when they were originally shown (if you get my meaning), so today, 6th August 2007, they will be showing the bulletin from 6th August 1982.
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Old 06-08-2007, 08:13
flobadob
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It's a shame that BBC24 doesn't show old news bulletins once a day. Young people may be interested to see how the Falklands War, for example, was reported day by day.
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Old 06-08-2007, 08:24
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If you can steer your dish around to 19.2 E, you can still watch a bit of Communist era news. CT24 (12382 Mhz, 27500 SR, horizontal) shows 25-year-old news bulletins from Czechoslovak TV at 18:49 local time. Very educational.

I've just discovered that they have all these bulletins online as well http://www.ct24.cz/vysilani/?porad=2...dp=10132488909

(pomalé means slow and rychlé means fast)

The interesting thing is that these archived news programmes are shown on the date when they were originally shown (if you get my meaning), so today, 6th August 2007, they will be showing the bulletin from 6th August 1982.
Wow, that's really interesting. Thanks!

This is just after the communist era, but here's the news from the day Slovenia declared its independence. Click on the PLAY icons or the screenshots to watch each segment of the news (you may need to change your player settings from Windows Media to RealPlayer):

http://www.rtvslo.si/odprtikop/dnevnik/25-6-1991/

And here's the dramatic evening news from day two of Slovenia's Ten-Day War against the Yugoslav Army:

http://www.rtvslo.si/odprtikop/dnevnik/29-6-1991/
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Old 06-08-2007, 14:58
Darren Lethem
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I've mentioned this in another thread, but if anyone is interested in the weird world of Serbian television today (well, two years ago), here's an interesting French-made documentary (with English narration) in its entirety:

Part 1

Part 2
That is fascinating viewing. I looked on Youtube to see if any other's in that series but no joy. Doesn't suprise me that it is French made. They make some excellent documentaries. If you watch ESPN Classic on Sky they show some great duels documentaries which are mainly French made too.
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Old 06-08-2007, 16:35
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That is fascinating viewing. I looked on Youtube to see if any other's in that series but no joy.
Actually, almost the entire series is available on YouTube, but unfortunately only with German narration. You'll find the episodes by searching for Zapping International, which is what the series is called in Germany.
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