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Flying - arm in plaster


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Old 08-01-2008, 16:52
halewood
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Is there any restrictions when flying with your arm in plaster. My nine-year-old daughter is flying with me on Saturday and has today had her arm put in plaster (fell over ice-skating).

We're flying with Ryanair and know they can look for any excuse to get more cash out of you. Can't find any reference to this on their website.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 08-01-2008, 16:57
WindChim
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hi

apparently it varies airline to airline .. my boss in previous job broke her foot a few months back and the airline asked for a 3 page medical report from doctor before allowing her to fly... she also had to have an open cast plaster (don't know if that's as it was on her leg so DVT risk?)... you really need to ring the airline to find out the implications and what they need from you.

good luck, and I hope she's ok
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:00
halewood
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hi

apparently it varies airline to airline .. my boss in previous job broke her foot a few months back and the airline asked for a 3 page medical report from doctor before allowing her to fly... she also had to have an open cast plaster (don't know if that's as it was on her leg so DVT risk?)... you really need to ring the airline to find out the implications and what they need from you.

good luck, and I hope she's ok
Thank you so much for your swift reply and it is very much appreciated. Trouble is it's extremely (previous unrelated experience) getting ANY LIVING PERSON on the end of a telephone from Ryanair.

I'll give it a go though - thanks once again.
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:04
WindChim
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thanks I only know as it was recent... but I do know that BA had a different policy to KLM so that's why it's best to check .. oh, and be warned, she had to pay for the doctor to do the form
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:07
Magenta01
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If she has only fractured it today, it should be in a backslab, which is an incomplete cast. This is fine for flying as the risk for a DVT is caused by casts which cover the circumference of the arm (air pressure and swelling), these can be split for the purpose of flying by the hospital.
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:09
halewood
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Found it: haven't read it thoroughly yet though

http://www.ryanair.com/site/EN/faqs....uest=brokenleg
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:09
WindChim
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also, might be worth ringing your insurance company as they might know more about the implications, and you should really notify them too....
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:11
Razzylew
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My OH broke his wrist skiing on holiday a couple of years ago. He had to have his wrist in a back slab (only solid plaster on one side) as a full cast doesn't allow your body to swell on the flight. He was given his xrays to show at check-in. They did look at them, and i think there was some certificate / completed form there, presumably saying he was ok to fly. They just looked at it at checkin and that was it. That was Thomas Cook i think....
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:13
eluf38
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When my friend broke his foot on holiday and had it in a full cast, the doctor advised him not to fly at all, as his foot might swell due to the pressure. Idiot cut off his cast, limped on the plane... and broke his foot again on holiday!
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:14
halewood
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From what I understand, it's called a buckle-break which is more of a compression type of injury to the bone.

The 'plaster' is one of these light-weight fibreglass type from below the elbow to the wrist. She has no need for a sling either.

What do you reckon?
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:15
Razzylew
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Its sounds like you should check with both a doctor and maybe the airline. You'll be in a pickle if there is a problem and you just turn up...
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Old 08-01-2008, 17:37
Magenta01
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If it's fibreglass, she won't be allowed to fly without a medical certificate and the cast probably being split to allow for swelling. Get on the phone to the fracture clinic at the hospital in the morning
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Old 08-01-2008, 18:14
summerdays
 
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I'm in the same situation as your daughter - arm in plaster - and no I am not allowed to fly, although I wouldn't be comfortable doing it even if I was because of air pressure, clots etc. It may depend on the length of flight (mine are long haul) so best ask your doctor.

I don't envy you getting in contact with Ryan Air - they're enough to give anyone a blood clot without even flying. Good luck!
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