Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
 

DS Forums

 
 

Double Glazing Condensation


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 14-01-2008, 16:57
webmuppet
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: UK
Posts: 223

We had all new double glazing installed last June and we seem to be suffering badly with condensation - place is getting a shade mouldy which is worrying. The problem is mostly upstairs.

Does this mean its been badly fitted or is there something else I need to do?

Cheers
webmuppet is offline   Reply With Quote
Please sign in or register to remove this advertisement.
Old 14-01-2008, 17:01
flowerpowa
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Playboy Mansion
Posts: 21,929
Our windows used to be like that before we had double glazing. Maybe badly fitted? get in touch with the people who installed them.
flowerpowa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:08
easterhoose
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Bonnie Scotland
Posts: 648

If the condensation is between the panes of glass the double glazing unit is faulty.....if it is condensation on the outside of the glass,or on walls,it's down to lack of ventilation.....open any vents fitted on the windows,or slightly open the windows.
easterhoose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:12
lifesabeach11
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Mersea Island
Posts: 2,366
My sons room is like that as he never has his window open ,but we do and ours is fine
lifesabeach11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:18
webmuppet
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: UK
Posts: 223
Should have mentioned, the condensation is on the inside rather than between the glass panes.
webmuppet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:23
diablo
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Fylde Coast
Posts: 7,927
A dehumidifier might help if you don't like opening windows.
diablo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:28
webmuppet
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: UK
Posts: 223
A dehumidifier might help if you don't like opening windows.
What I'm really after is whether they have been fitted incorrectly or if I have a structural problem rather than how to solve the condensation issues. Since the windows are less than a year old they're still covered.
webmuppet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:29
sancheeez
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,763
Should have mentioned, the condensation is on the inside rather than between the glass panes.
Then it's a ventilation issue.

If anything, it means your double glazing is working very well as moisture is not getting out of the small gaps where draughts used to get in.
sancheeez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:31
lifesabeach11
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Mersea Island
Posts: 2,366
I don't think there's is anything wrong just lack of air
Maybe give them a ring and explain
lifesabeach11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:52
paulyoung666
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 8,151
Then it's a ventilation issue.

If anything, it means your double glazing is working very well as moisture is not getting out of the small gaps where draughts used to get in.

100 % right , i used to fit the stuff and the number of callbacks was crazy , and all it was down to was lack of ventilation , do the windows not have trickle vents ??? , i thought they had to have them nowadays , might be wrong on that point though
paulyoung666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 17:56
Rugby Rose
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: South Staffs/Wolverhampton
Posts: 12,931
There are a few of us who have this problem on here. Because we've sealed our houses up so tightly, we now have to physically let the moisture out from showers, baths, drying washing or it just ends up as condensation and then mould. Open a window regularly or leave a window on the ventilation catch.
Rugby Rose is offline Follow this poster on Twitter   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 20:03
Earake
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Down South
Posts: 1,785
do the windows not have trickle vents ??? , i thought they had to have them nowadays , might be wrong on that point though
Correct, but I don't know when the building regs. changed. OP could Google that if the windows aren't fitted with the vents
Earake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 20:33
Charlie Coo
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 10,456
Just a tip if you are cleaning black mould off the wall - spray it after with a mix of one third tea tree oil and 2 thirds water - we did this and it's stayed away.
Charlie Coo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2008, 20:59
Cineast
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 2,437
Yup, we get this all the time and our double glazing is fine. If you have vents at the top of the windows, keep these open at all times and that'll help a bit. I open my windows every morning for a few hours and this takes the majority of the water away - the house is freezing but it works and gives the house a good airing at the same time I then just wipe any remaining water off the panes with a cloth.

As mentioned previously, Dettox Mould and Mildew remover ( it's in a green bottle) works a treat on the black mould that can gather, and helps prevent it from forming again, but be careful spraying it near fabric as it can take the colour out of it.
Cineast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-02-2008, 12:09
laburnum
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3
I have a 19th century 2 bedroomed cottage in Norfolk, which has been progressively insulated over the last 10 years. Full double glazing was introduced without any condensation problems. However, serious black mould problems appeared throughout the cottage shortly after I had the roof fully insulated a year ago.

I panicked at first as I had spent over 4000 insulating the cottage over the last few years. I thought that some of my double glazing units had failed. However, I was recommended to investigate Heat Recovery Venitialtors (HRVs) as a possible quicky and easy solution to the mould and condensation. I had not heard of the technology before, so I was a bit sceptical to say the least. However, there is useful information available on the internet.

The idea is simple, a HRV box is installed in the attic which extracts stale moisture laden air from both bedrooms and is discharged through an outside vent in the roof, fresh air is drawn in through a separate outside vent again in the roof and heat is recovered from the expelled air and introduced to the fresh air at a rate of approximately 70% heat recovery. The fresh warmed air is then fed back in to the cottage from a vent located over the stairs. The unit runs constantly and quietly at a slight positive pressure, replenishing the cottage's interior air space with warm fresh air many times over a day.

I had an HRV unit installed a couple of months ago in the place of a noisy and expensive dehumidifier. The HRV was not cheap (over 1000), however, all my condensation problems were instantly eradicated following installation, no more condensation on the windows or puddles of water on bedroom window sills. The cottage's air quality is vastly improved. My cottage is slowly drying out and should cost much less to heat in the meantime as walls and interior air spaces are mush drier. I also understand that it meets all the latest building regulations and so should score well on the environmental categories of the Home Information Pack when I come to sell.

I hope this infomation helps............
laburnum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-02-2008, 16:58
seacam
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 12,402
What I'm really after is whether they have been fitted incorrectly or if I have a structural problem rather than how to solve the condensation issues. Since the windows are less than a year old they're still covered.
Hello Webmuppet,

As a company we install DG, it's highly unlikely that you have a structural problem, even if that were the case, you would be experiencing bigger problems then condensation.

Not every house suits UPVC, DG can cause the problems you are experiencing, especially due to lack of ventilation or no movement of air.

It is as everyone is telling you a ventilation problem, it should not be to difficult a task to try to rectify.

Try this, purchase a 12-16 ins cheap Argos pedestal or desk fan.

Set it up in the worst room and leave on overnight, windows closed, then another night, with trickle vents open, see which improves things for you.

Obviously you can't have fans running all the time, you might also consider installing some vent bricks in the affected rooms.
seacam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-02-2008, 18:55
Biz
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 7,492
................
I hope this information helps............
That sounds very interesting, laburnum. Which firm did you use, and do you think it would be possible just to have an inlet/outlet on the ceiling of the landing?

I've just googled, but up to now could only see whole house systems.

I don't have a condensation problem, but it sounds as if it would be more economical than opening windows as I do.
Biz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-02-2008, 07:08
laburnum
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3
The other technology is Positive Input Ventilation (PIV) which requires only one vent in the stairwell ceiling. A PIV unit pumps air from inside the loft space in to the house at a positive pressure to blow out stale condensed air out from the house using pre-existing leakage points in the structure. PIV technology is cheaper but does not recover any heat apart from heat gain in the loft, if any.

There are a lot of companies out there, just google Heat Recovery Unit and/or Positive Input Ventilation to find a few companies to approach. However, do your detailed research to learn about the technology first rather than depend on the talents of a sales person to persuade you.

A very good leaflet to read is provided by the Energy Savings Trust at the following link:

http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/...0dwellings.pdf
laburnum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-02-2008, 07:09
laburnum
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3
Revised Link:

http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/...0dwellings.pdf
laburnum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-02-2008, 08:26
flicker
Forum Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: West Wales
Posts: 14,066
I don't "get" double glazing really, I have the condensation problem, and yes I have vents, but I keep them shut, so my fault I know. But the thing is, I thought the whole idea of double glazing is to keep you warmer, so opening the vents makes it bloody freezing in here. The drafts from the wind are horrendous in this place. If I open the window, even slightly, the temperature drops to about 48f in my bedroom overnight, and I get woken up at the crack of dawn by neighbours starting up their vans and leaving them running to de-ice. No thanks.

I'd rather put up with the condensation and wipe the windows down.
flicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-02-2008, 10:26
Seven2off
Banned User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,085
I don't "get" double glazing really, I have the condensation problem, and yes I have vents, but I keep them shut, so my fault I know. But the thing is, I thought the whole idea of double glazing is to keep you warmer, so opening the vents makes it bloody freezing in here.
There's no such thing as a free lunch. If you want to cut down on your energy bills, by reducing heat losses through your windows or indeed, roofs, walls and the like, you need to insulate them in some manner.

If you don't then you'll lose heat.

If you do insulate, then you should bear in mind you've just blocked many of the leakage points, which will result in poor ventilation and thus give you humidity problems. To tackle this, you need to make sure you have both a good intake and extract points to allow air to circulate through the house.

What the lord giveth with one hand, the lord taketh with the other.

The drafts from the wind are horrendous in this place. If I open the window, even slightly, the temperature drops to about 48f in my bedroom overnight, and I get woken up at the crack of dawn by neighbours starting up their vans and leaving them running to de-ice. No thanks.
How about opening your windows during the day, when you're out? With reason of course...

I'd rather put up with the condensation and wipe the windows down.
That is your pregoative.
Seven2off is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2008, 20:49
paulyoung666
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 8,151
silica gel ???
paulyoung666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2008, 22:30
Agent Krycek
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Stalking David and Neal
Posts: 33,084
We had all new double glazing installed last June and we seem to be suffering badly with condensation - place is getting a shade mouldy which is worrying. The problem is mostly upstairs.

Does this mean its been badly fitted or is there something else I need to do?

Cheers
There should be trickle ventilators that should be left open, if there not it will cause condensation.

Replacement of double glazing comes under the Building Regulations, has done for a few years, were your windows fitted by FENSA approved contractors, if not, then you should arrange for approval under Building Regulations.
Agent Krycek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-11-2008, 13:09
quatro
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: somerset
Posts: 2,634
On a development where I used to live we had this problem. Me and a neighbour drilled 2cm diameter ventilation holes [covered with nylon mesh] in the top corner and bottom corner of affected rooms - the bathroom and front bedrooms in both cases.
The vents were hardly noticeable but allowed air/moisture/spores to circulate and leave the building.
It was very successful. It worked for us.
The neighbours who laughed at us were still left with a problem and seemed happy to accept constant wiping down of windows during the winter and black mould in places!
quatro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-11-2008, 13:48
milnrow_lad
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Milnrow Lancs Lat53.6 Long-2.1
Posts: 203
On a development where I used to live we had this problem. Me and a neighbour drilled 2cm diameter ventilation holes [covered with nylon mesh] in the top corner and bottom corner of affected rooms - the bathroom and front bedrooms in both cases.
The vents were hardly noticeable but allowed air/moisture/spores to circulate and leave the building.
It was very successful. It worked for us.
The neighbours who laughed at us were still left with a problem and seemed happy to accept constant wiping down of windows during the winter and black mould in places!
Can you please clarify.

Was that 2 holes in each room? 1 in ceiling and 1 in floor?

Have condensation problems since wall and loft insulation installed - Have a dehumdifier at present....but this will only do 1 room at a time...

thanks

MilnrowLad
milnrow_lad is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 14:22.