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Agricultural land - what can you do with it?


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Old 25-05-2008, 18:01
henders
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I'm interested in buying a house that has a paddock included in the price. I presume (but can't check til Tues) that this would be classed as agricultural land. Obviously we wouldn't be able to build on it, but what could we do? Lay turf for a lawn? Grow veg? Plant trees? Lay gravel or tarmac paths? Put up a garden shed? (I suppose a swimming pool is out of the question?!)

Does anyone know what sort of restrictions apply to use of this kind of land? I've had a quick google but if anyone can point me to a useful website i'd be v grateful
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Old 25-05-2008, 18:05
stud u like
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Plenty of people are selling off their agricultural land around here and putting up whole new housing estates.
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Old 25-05-2008, 18:53
lemonbun
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It really depends on the area. Where I live, planting a garden (i.e. flowers, bushes, paths, etc.) is not allowed without change of use permission and many people will report you if you do it without permission. A vegetable patch and fruit trees are fine.

The local council's website might have some information.
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Old 25-05-2008, 18:58
dome
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You cannot just create a garden you'd have to go to planning and request change of use.
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Old 25-05-2008, 19:18
Channel Hopper
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With a bit of land you can claim that you are outstanding in your field.

But seriously you could leave it as it is and let it grow wild, apply for a nature reserve licence, Throw in a couple of rare species of animal and plant (though you can start off with decoys and colourful imitations), and then charge muchos wonga for twitchers and eco-preservationists to spend time on it - but get shot of the decoys beforehand.

How much land is in the paddock ?
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Old 25-05-2008, 23:46
scorpio man
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But seriously you could leave it as it is and let it grow wild, apply for a nature reserve licence, Throw in a couple of rare species of animal and plant (though you can start off with decoys and colourful imitations), and then charge muchos wonga for twitchers and eco-preservationists to spend time on it - but get shot of the decoys beforehand.
You'd do well as Sir Alans apprentice
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Old 26-05-2008, 00:20
duffystev
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I'm interested in buying a house that has a paddock included in the price. I presume (but can't check til Tues) that this would be classed as agricultural land. Obviously we wouldn't be able to build on it, but what could we do? Lay turf for a lawn? Grow veg? Plant trees? Lay gravel or tarmac paths? Put up a garden shed? (I suppose a swimming pool is out of the question?!)

Does anyone know what sort of restrictions apply to use of this kind of land? I've had a quick google but if anyone can point me to a useful website i'd be v grateful
Just go onto your councils own website. They have loads of information and helpful tel nos.

I can't give you the answers but your council can.
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Old 26-05-2008, 01:13
Channel Hopper
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You'd do well as Sir Alans apprentice
I'd consider employing him, if he smartens up a bit.
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Old 26-05-2008, 08:35
Galaxy266
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A friend of mine bought a house with a large field attached to it last year.

With an agreement with a local farmer he keeps several sheep in the field. It ensures that the field is continuously used, and keeps the grass nice and short, too! The farmer also cuts the very large hedge using his tractor.

My friend doesn't have any other use for the field, apart from keeping it under his ownership to ensure nothing can ever be built on it.
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Old 26-05-2008, 11:58
maybe
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The best place to start is the DEFRA website, which explains the rules about management of farmland.

There are grants available for varous kinds of 'Environmental Stewardship' etc, which encourage such things as replanting hedgerows, maintaining stone walls, creation of meadows, maintaining a suitable environment for wildlfe etc. It will depend partly on how much land your paddock comprises - I think payments are made per hectare. DEFRA will be able to advise you on all aspects of agricultural use as well as change of use planning permission.

DEFRA Environmental Stewardship Scheme
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Old 26-05-2008, 18:24
henders
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With a bit of land you can claim that you are outstanding in your field.

But seriously you could leave it as it is and let it grow wild, apply for a nature reserve licence, Throw in a couple of rare species of animal and plant (though you can start off with decoys and colourful imitations), and then charge muchos wonga for twitchers and eco-preservationists to spend time on it - but get shot of the decoys beforehand.

How much land is in the paddock ?


It's about an acre, i think. Thanks for the replies everyone
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Old 27-05-2008, 20:03
wishfulthinking
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It is not just a planning issue for the Council.

You (your solicitor) need to check the title for restrictive covenants relating to use that have been put on by the previous or past owners. If there are any you would have to obtain a deed of release as well as sorting out the planning stuff. Sometimes this can be expensive but if you can't agree then it could be a Lands Tribunal. Your solicitor should explain this all to you.
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Old 27-05-2008, 20:21
blueblade
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I'm interested in buying a house that has a paddock included in the price. I presume (but can't check til Tues) that this would be classed as agricultural land. Obviously we wouldn't be able to build on it, but what could we do? Lay turf for a lawn? Grow veg? Plant trees? Lay gravel or tarmac paths? Put up a garden shed? (I suppose a swimming pool is out of the question?!)

Does anyone know what sort of restrictions apply to use of this kind of land? I've had a quick google but if anyone can point me to a useful website i'd be v grateful
Why do you have to have a paddock. Why not just a house with a very large plot of land. Then you can do as you wish with it, garden wise, without having to get planning permission.
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Old 27-05-2008, 22:42
Lululamb
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I would love to buy a house that came with a large plot of land but they tend to be far a few between and very expensive if they are in a nice area. I'm hoping to buy two plots of land at auction tomorrow night both of which are for agricultural or equestrian use. If i get both i'm going to start a DIY Livery business and if i only get one i will probably not do anything with it until i want to use it for my own horse.

We will try and get planning permission although very very unlikely but worth a shot.
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Old 28-05-2008, 12:40
nibsco
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Given the strong likelihood of food shortages before too long I recommend fruit and veg.
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Old 21-01-2012, 14:26
Camino
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we have just bought a plot of agricultural land that backs onto our house as have some of our neighbours, one of them put a greenhouse up and someone complained so its screwed it up for all of us, the council have come down on them like a ton of bricks and said they have to remove the greenhouse and arent even allowed any domestic furniture or flowers on the plot, we did know all this before we agreed to buy the land so the neighbours cant moan really but they have just said they will be challenging the council now!
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Old 21-01-2012, 14:35
Hotgossip
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we have just bought a plot of agricultural land that backs onto our house as have some of our neighbours, one of them put a greenhouse up and someone complained so its screwed it up for all of us, the council have come down on them like a ton of bricks and said they have to remove the greenhouse and arent even allowed any domestic furniture or flowers on the plot, we did know all this before we agreed to buy the land so the neighbours cant moan really but they have just said they will be challenging the council now!
People often do this - assume any rules or laws don't apply to them. If it's agricultural land then it's not an extension of their garden.
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Old 21-01-2012, 14:41
Judge Mental
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It's also worth checking whether the land is outside the development limits of the town/village, whether it's in a conservation area or the green belt or some other area of special interest - all these are factors which will affect how likely you would be to get change of use from agricultural to other other. Essentially you should assume that you will need change of use approval to do anything other than grazing animals or growing crops but contact your District planning department (Development Control) and they can give you this information. Change of use is similar to obtaining ordinary planning permission to develop the land and may involve similar investigations on things like ecology, archeology etc (depending on whether there are particular issues of this kind)
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Old 21-01-2012, 14:47
Nigel Goodwin
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we have just bought a plot of agricultural land that backs onto our house as have some of our neighbours, one of them put a greenhouse up and someone complained so its screwed it up for all of us, the council have come down on them like a ton of bricks and said they have to remove the greenhouse and arent even allowed any domestic furniture or flowers on the plot, we did know all this before we agreed to buy the land so the neighbours cant moan really but they have just said they will be challenging the council now!
That sounds pretty good for you then - their expense, and if they win you can get benefit!
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Old 21-01-2012, 14:49
Camino
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that's good advice Judge, I don't think the council will let them have a change of use we have already said we arent going to be challenging them but my neighbours think they are above the law apparently, idiots!
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Old 21-01-2012, 14:51
*stargazer*
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Owning a plot of agricultural land means that you can keep development further away from your home and enjoy the view. I think that anyone who expects more than that is being optimistic.
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Old 21-01-2012, 14:51
Camino
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That sounds pretty good for you then - their expense, and if they win you can get benefit!
well yes i suppose so but we are only using ours as an allotment and if we want a greenhouse we will build it on our existing garden and not the plot, sorry but sometimes my neighbours annoy me, they read and agreed on the conditions before buying so i dont know why they are kicking up about it now?
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Old 21-01-2012, 15:05
Aarghawasp!
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Keep chickens or maybe pigs/goats? Grow your own fruit and veg. Or if that's not your thing you could post on Landshare and come to an arrangement with some locals who are looking for land to work.
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Old 21-01-2012, 15:43
Supratad
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Keep chickens or maybe pigs/goats? Grow your own fruit and veg. Or if that's not your thing you could post on Landshare and come to an arrangement with some locals who are looking for land to work.
Now that's an excellant idea, you could have your own manageable sized bit, and rent out the rest...maybe in strips in a feudal system.
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Old 14-04-2012, 09:08
Camino
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my neighbours have just erected a lovely pretty fence on the agricultural land this week and it just so happened the council were visiting another neighbour and spotted the fence and came down and told them they have to remove the fence because it isnt a proper stock one that is only allowed on agricultural land! i have to laugh, we are lucky that we hadnt bought our fence but the neighbours must be hopping mad
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